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Descendants of John 1 Kerr


Generation No. 21


113. JACK ROBERT21 RANEY (LILLIAN20 CARR, ROBERT JEFFERSON (3)19, SAMUEL WEBSTER18, ROBERT JEFFERSON (2)17, ROBERT JEFFERSON (1)16, STUTELY (15)15, ELEAZAR (14)14, CALEB CARR III13 (13), CALEB12 CARR12 JR, CALEB CARR11 (11), ROBERT CARR10 (10), BENJAMIN 99 KERR, WILLIAM 88, JOHN 77, ANDREW 66, THOMAS 55, THOMAS 44, ANDREW 33, ROBERT 22, JOHN 11)1 was born July 21, 1926 in Corpus Christi Texas1, and died October 27, 1984 in El Paso Texas1. He married VIRGINIA SARAH REID1 October 23, 1948 in El Paso Texas1, daughter of LOUIS REID and LYDIA SHEPPARD. She was born in El Paso Texas1.
     
Child of J
ACK RANEY and VIRGINIA REID is:
  i.   SUSAN NELLE22 RANEY1, b. March 15, 1961, El Paso Texas1.


114. EARNEST WILLIAM21 PROUT (LILLIAN20 CARR, ROBERT JEFFERSON (3)19, SAMUEL WEBSTER18, ROBERT JEFFERSON (2)17, ROBERT JEFFERSON (1)16, STUTELY (15)15, ELEAZAR (14)14, CALEB CARR III13 (13), CALEB12 CARR12 JR, CALEB CARR11 (11), ROBERT CARR10 (10), BENJAMIN 99 KERR, WILLIAM 88, JOHN 77, ANDREW 66, THOMAS 55, THOMAS 44, ANDREW 33, ROBERT 22, JOHN 11)1 was born August 07, 1932 in El Paso Texas1. He married MARGARET LUCILLE MUELER1 October 20, 1956 in Maywood, Ill, daughter of FRED MUELER and NATLLIE EARL. She was born August 06, 1937 in Chicago Ill1.
     
Children of E
ARNEST PROUT and MARGARET MUELER are:
146. i.   CHRISTINE CAROL22 PROUT, b. May 23, 1958, Oak Park Ill.
  ii.   JAMES EARNEST HENRY PROUT1, b. January 28, 1961, Elgin Ill1.
  iii.   SAVANA MARIE PROUT1, b. September 17, 1988, Texas1.


115. EDWARD LEE21 BROOKS (MATTIE LAURA20 CARR, ROBERT JEFFERSON (3)19, SAMUEL WEBSTER18, ROBERT JEFFERSON (2)17, ROBERT JEFFERSON (1)16, STUTELY (15)15, ELEAZAR (14)14, CALEB CARR III13 (13), CALEB12 CARR12 JR, CALEB CARR11 (11), ROBERT CARR10 (10), BENJAMIN 99 KERR, WILLIAM 88, JOHN 77, ANDREW 66, THOMAS 55, THOMAS 44, ANDREW 33, ROBERT 22, JOHN 11)1 was born May 02, 1930 in Las Cruces, New Mexico1, and died July 25, 1996 in Silver City, New Mexico1. He married NORA ANN ODOM1 April 06, 1953 in Las Cruces, New Mexico, daughter of ELIE ODOM and FLORA STURART. She was born February 01, 1933 in O'Donnel, California1.
     
Child of E
DWARD BROOKS and NORA ODOM is:
147. i.   EDWARD LEE JR.22 BROOKS, b. December 03, 1954, Big Springs Texas.


116. MATTIE CATHERINE21 BROOKS (MATTIE LAURA20 CARR, ROBERT JEFFERSON (3)19, SAMUEL WEBSTER18, ROBERT JEFFERSON (2)17, ROBERT JEFFERSON (1)16, STUTELY (15)15, ELEAZAR (14)14, CALEB CARR III13 (13), CALEB12 CARR12 JR, CALEB CARR11 (11), ROBERT CARR10 (10), BENJAMIN 99 KERR, WILLIAM 88, JOHN 77, ANDREW 66, THOMAS 55, THOMAS 44, ANDREW 33, ROBERT 22, JOHN 11)1 was born June 02, 1931 in Messila Park, New Mexico1. She married (1) J. T. MEEKS1 in Uvalde, Texas. She married (2) JACK RANDALL MCCUTCHEN1 June 15, 1945 in Van Horn Texas, son of THURSTON MCCUTCHEN and EULA SNYDER. He was born July 11, 1927 in Robert Lee Texas1. She married (3) GEORGE WALTON VICKERS1 July 15, 1961 in Monahans, Texas. She married (4) ? ?1 February 1997 in Commanche Texas.
     
Children of M
ATTIE BROOKS and JACK MCCUTCHEN are:
148. i.   JACK RANDALL JR22 MCCUTCHEN, b. June 16, 1946, El Paso Texas.
  ii.   DORIS ELLEN MCCUTCHEN1, b. April 12, 1949, Van Horn Texas1; m. RANDALL JACKSON1, November 14, 1970, Texas1; b. , Canada1.
149. iii.   SYLVIA KAYE MCCUTCHEN, b. August 22, 1950, Van Horn, Texas.


117. KEITH WAYNE21 BROOKS (MATTIE LAURA20 CARR, ROBERT JEFFERSON (3)19, SAMUEL WEBSTER18, ROBERT JEFFERSON (2)17, ROBERT JEFFERSON (1)16, STUTELY (15)15, ELEAZAR (14)14, CALEB CARR III13 (13), CALEB12 CARR12 JR, CALEB CARR11 (11), ROBERT CARR10 (10), BENJAMIN 99 KERR, WILLIAM 88, JOHN 77, ANDREW 66, THOMAS 55, THOMAS 44, ANDREW 33, ROBERT 22, JOHN 11)1 was born November 26, 1932 in Pilares Texas1, and died May 08, 1967 in Odessa, Texas1. He married DOROTHY OLEAN BLYTHE1 January 07, 1953 in Las Cruces, New Mexico1, daughter of GEORGE BLYTHE and ? BLYTHE. She was born in Texas1.
     
Children of K
EITH BROOKS and DOROTHY BLYTHE are:
  i.   ROBERT WAYNE22 HEARD*1.
150. ii.   PATRICIA GAYLE BROOKS, b. April 15, 1953, El Paso Texas.
151. iii.   NORMAN WAYNE BROOKS, b. December 18, 1954, El Paso Texas.
152. iv.   ROGER DALE BROOKS, b. November 30, 1956, Monahans Texas.


118. GROVER LOUIS21 BROOKS (MATTIE LAURA20 CARR, ROBERT JEFFERSON (3)19, SAMUEL WEBSTER18, ROBERT JEFFERSON (2)17, ROBERT JEFFERSON (1)16, STUTELY (15)15, ELEAZAR (14)14, CALEB CARR III13 (13), CALEB12 CARR12 JR, CALEB CARR11 (11), ROBERT CARR10 (10), BENJAMIN 99 KERR, WILLIAM 88, JOHN 77, ANDREW 66, THOMAS 55, THOMAS 44, ANDREW 33, ROBERT 22, JOHN 11)1 was born August 08, 1934 in Pilares Texas, South of Van Horn on the Rio Grande River1. He married EDITH MILSON1 in Van Horn Texas1. She was born in Texas1.
     
Children of G
ROVER BROOKS and EDITH MILSON are:
  i.   NANCY KAREN22 MILSON*1, b. August 02, 1948, Texas1.
  ii.   IRA RAY JR MILSON*1, b. January 10, 1950, Texas1.
  iii.   SHERRY DIANE MILSON*1, b. November 06, 1952, Texas1.
  iv.   MAIRIAM MOZELL MILSON*1, b. December 15, 1956, Texas1.
  v.   CYNTHIA JUNE MILSON*1, b. February 12, 1962, Texas1.
  vi.   CHRISTOPHER LEE MILSON*1, b. July 24, 1968, Texas1.


119. BEVERLY ANN21 BROOKS (MATTIE LAURA20 CARR, ROBERT JEFFERSON (3)19, SAMUEL WEBSTER18, ROBERT JEFFERSON (2)17, ROBERT JEFFERSON (1)16, STUTELY (15)15, ELEAZAR (14)14, CALEB CARR III13 (13), CALEB12 CARR12 JR, CALEB CARR11 (11), ROBERT CARR10 (10), BENJAMIN 99 KERR, WILLIAM 88, JOHN 77, ANDREW 66, THOMAS 55, THOMAS 44, ANDREW 33, ROBERT 22, JOHN 11)1 was born May 29, 1938 in Pilares Texas South of Van Horn off Highway 90 on the Rio Grande River1. She married DURWIN RAY ROGERS1 August 19, 1955 in Shreveport La, son of HENRY ROGERS and EFFIE SINGLETARY. He was born May 22, 1934 in Flanagan Texas1.

Notes for B
EVERLY ANN BROOKS:
Beverly Ann Brooks Rogers daughter of Mattie Laura Carr and Robert Lee
Brooks and wife of Durwin Ray Rogers.


Born on the Rio Grande River at Pilares Texas across the river from
Pilares Mexico where the whole family lived at that time by her Grand
Father and Mother in an adobe house. We had a family reunion at the
96 Ranch in1984 and there was about 300 or more people there.
I was a new ham at the time and was hot on two meters. Jimmy Dean is
The only kid who went with us. Donald was going to go but has just
Got married and had more important things to do. You get three by
Leaving highway 90 south of Van Horn Texas at lobo and go about 10
Miles down a country road and turn toward Needle Peak and head out
Through the bushes to the 96 Ranchand if you go to Pilarez you go on
Farther south. This was farming country back around the turn of the
Century and a lot of Mexicans and White People as well made there
Living on what they could grow. The had a SOTOL distillery at that
Time and some of the people knew Pancho Villa on a first name basis.


Had some problems as a teen-ager but they were resolved. When Durwin
R. Rogers got of the United States Navy in April of 1955, one of his
Last stops after going to east Texas and buying a second hand 1950
Chevrolet car was a trip from El Paso to Van Horn Texas. She went
Back to El Paso with him and then he enlisted in the United States Air
Force and departed for Barksdale AFB in Louisiana. After he got about
Half squared away with the Air Force he sent her the money to ride a
Train from Van Horn to Shreveport La. They rented an apartment at 514
Wyche street in Bossier and with the help of Mama and some of the
Other outlaws (in-laws) got enough stuff to set up house keeping and
Got married on the 19th of August 1955 in Shreveport Louisiana in the
Down town Baptist church after a lecture from the preacher. From
There she went to England and then back to Roswell New Mexico and then
To March AFB California and then went to RAF Upper Heyford in England
And from there to Lindsay Air Station in Wiesbaden Germany. From there
She Went to Randolph AFB in Universal City Texas and finally back to
Barksdale where the old man retired on March 1, 1973 and on May 31,
1973 moved to Panola Texas where she had purchased some land a an
Incomplete house that they have worked on ever since. In the meantime
In 1980 she went to work for the United States Postal Service and
Worked for the until 1993 when she retired at age 55. She was a
Licensed beautician having gone to Pat Goins Beauty School in 1971/72.



Beverly Ann Rogers

It gets pretty cold in Roswell New Mexico. It snowed so much that you
Had to shovel the snow out from in front of the Garage and had
Trouble getting to work. I took the boys out in the yard in the snow
And they did not like that at all. In fact they started crying when
They had been out for a few minutes and got cold so I let them go back
Into the house and in fact, I went back inside with them. The first
Thing that happened while we were living in that house was that the
Heater was not very modern and leaked gas and if you stayed to long you
Would get a headache. Then the couch fell apart and we went and
Bought another one with two chairs and the first television we ever
Owned and as soon as we got it in the house and running the tower
(Television tower) for the Roswell channel what ever it was fell down
And that meant the signal to the house was not too good. Then the bed
Fell down and then we had to buy a regular sized bed and the bottom
And box springs and put it up. The guys at the office bought ht me a
New gun rack (four gun) and I put it up on the wall and was in Hog
Heaven. I had bought a .22 in Carthage and it was $79.00 for a Marlin
Golden Hawk and I still have it but the front sight hood was taken off
Of it in my travels to England and G many but I did not have any place
To leave them so I took them with me. I went to work in Testing for a
Negro Technical Sergeant (Graham) when I first reported to Walker Air
Force Base and it was a good job. The second day on the job I was up
Front an administering test's. He said "if you don't do it now you
Will never do it and" and he was right. It was a tremendous help when
I later had to go to NCO Preparatory school and one of the classes was
Making speeches. I then bought a Winchester model 9 .30-30 and still
Have it. I paid about the same thing for it that I paid for the .22,
Or about $80.00 or maybe a little more. We went up in the mountains
Above Capitan and out on some Ranch. We did not have a tent or
Anything but just built a fire on the side of the road. We built a
Fire for cooking and went to the hills to hunt in the morning. We (me
And Trevino) were hunting together and we were setting on a log
Killing time and some Wapiti came up on us and of course we tried to
Kill one and m missed and I guess it was a good thing because we did
Not have an Elk permit. Carey kills a little buck and brought it back
To the camp and we had to get a pencil from the game warded to fill
Out the deer tag. Carey and me took the deer back to Roswell the night
And have it cleaned, processed and cut up. The other guys (Fred and
Trevino) stayed up there that night and thought they were going to
Freeze to death. Carey and me had to work the next day because it was
Thanksgiving and the office was on holiday schedule and we went back
Up on Saturday. On the way up we bought a bottle of Whiskey and when
We got through hunting on Sunday; I sat down waiting for everybody to
Get ready to go back to Roswell and I took a big drink of Whiskey and
Nearly got drunk on one swallow. But in all fairness I had not eaten
Anything but a can of beans and did not have much in my stomach for
The whiskey to mix with. I killed two porcupines while I was hunting
With a .22 Pistol and told someone about it and found out the were
Protected and it was a $100.00 fine to kill one. I didn't tell
Anyone else but we seen one that had been run over when we were going
Back to Roswell. The tour of duty at Walker is the top assignment I
Ever had. The people were nice and really t only thing I did not
Like was the Officer and Airman Effectiveness and performance report
System.

I was moved over to the Officer Effectiveness Report and Airman
Performance Report Section and we were one of the best in 15th Air
Force for a number of months running and it was strictly because of
The work of the people who I had working for me. I go my ass up about
Prepatory school, because they wanted me to go and there were Staff
Sergeants who had been on the Base longer than me that had not gone so
I threw a fit. I had made Staff Sergeant on the 1st of March 1960 and
They had a quota to fill so whether I was the next eligible or not I
Went to class to 61A. We went in January 1961 and the course was a
Month long. I took BABS and the kids to Monahans to stay with Skeeter
And went back to Walker AFB New Mexico (In Roswell) to go to school,
As you had to lived in the Barracks, on base while you were attending
This school. We got started and it was kinda fun. I kept getting
Demerits for my shoes being not aligned right and I could not see
Anything wrong with the so I finally went and got the instructor and
Asked him. He came in and went to the wrong end of the bed and showed
Me. I said "that good, except those are not my shoes; my shoes are on
The other end of the bunk". Well he was embarrassed and wanted to
Know if I wanted him to take the demerits off and I said "no". For
Each perfect paper you had on the end of the week tests (we took a
Weekly testing battery of tests actually) and for each perfect paper
You had they took of two demerits and when we ended the week they owed
Me point. The test were easy and there was a few times that I did not
Make a perfect score on them. The odd thing I had made such a fuss
About going to the school they (the management) thought I was going to
Flunk out of the school. Well when the dust settled and we had our
Graduation banquet I was the Academic Award Winner and place second
For "Honor Student" (selected by the trainees) and fifth for the
Commandants Award. Management had to live with their heads in the
And for a while (more than likely up their ass). I was supposed to
Go to (reassigned) the Combat Crew Training School but because of the
Flap over Prepatory school they were cool to me and we were joking
Around about writing our congressman so I put a paper in my typewriter
And wrote a Note of Lyndon Johnson (as a joke and gave to the people
In the office) and they gave (showed it to the Major in charge) and he
Got hot under the collar. About that time there was a requirement to
Send one Staff Sergeant to Headquarters 15th Air Force in Riverside
California and I did not want to go as we were having too much fun
Hunting rabbits and going to the Pecos river and playing on the
Weekends and shooting .22 and having a big time. Well needles to say
I got nominated and selected by 15th Air Force. We had just moved to a
Place on 1108 West First Street and got a washing machine from Skeeter
And a refrigerator from her mother that had come out of a trailer
House. We bought a table and chairs (still have the chars in 1995)
And moved to the new house. I guess we had been there a month or two
When I got my orders to March AFB California. I guess it's a good
Thing we were moved because we had started going to Old Mexico and
Getting some 10 Centavo pieces and taking a hammer (two hammers) and
Pounding them out to the size of quarter (it only took a few licks) and
Then we would go to a coke machine and put the 10-centavo pieces in
And get a coke for a nickel $.05 and twenty cents change. We got
Braver and went to a washerteria that had a change machine and got re
Money for the bad coins. Pure profit. We also would buy some .22
Shorts and get in the Cedar Flats and kill enough doves to fill up a
Dish pan. We would set on the bank of the Pecos river and skin the
Birds and through the feathers in the river. Would have three or
Four miles of dove feather going down the river before we got them
Cleaned. If we had got caught we would have gone to jail or under the
Jail because we were killing them during their nesting season and that
Was bad. Then we would take them back to the house, buy a six pack of
Bulldog malt liquor or something and the old lady would cook the doves
And we would all eat until we were full and play Crazy Eight until we
Had to use two decks of cards because it would not be to long until a
Person could remember what cards had been played. Trevino moved out
To an old German Prison Camp and we went out there and his wife was
From the Philippines and could cook some stewed chicken that was some
Kind of good, but the way she went about it s not to swift. They had
Moved out of their House in Roswell because his wife was trying to
Learn how to drive and would get out in the front yard and move the
Car back and forth. She got confused and run it into the house and
Pushed the house off the foundation. This was back in the time of
Johnny Unitas and when he was the Number One quarterback in the world
And played for the Baltimore Colts. The only thing worse than moving
To California was backtracking about two miles through the desert to
Fine gun (.22 pistol) that you had lost during your walk. I done
That one time but got to where I could kill a rabbit with a .22 pistol
Drawing pointing and shooting. Doreen is about as close to her in
Cooking as can be. Both are good gook cooks, but I d 't like to watch
Them when they are doing it. I learned that I could witch water when
I was living at the second place in Roswell New Mexico and go to where
I could find a water line in the ground with a forked limb. Some
People think that is a bunch shit, but it works. I witched water
For Roy Ellison at his place on the bank of the Sabine River where
He had a trailer house. It fell into a pool of water when we broke
Through and dropped about three or four feet. We pounded the pipe
Into the ground.       The 1960 Ford Falcon was a good automobile
But this one gave me some problems when it was first new. First of
All they changed the break in oil and gave it back to me to drive.
Well the thing started running hot and we drove it to El Paso and to
Van H Horn and it was running hot. Finally I got enough sense to check
The oil and all it had in it was what came in the filter, because it
Was not changed. I told the people who serviced it that I had a
Potential problem or they did because of the failure t put oil in
It. Well it never used any oil ever, so I would say they got away
Clean. Another problems was that when the automatic transmission
Would go to drive from reverse there would be a popping sound. They
Looked at it three or four time and could find nothing wrong with it.
When I was going to Preparatory school one of the guy going to school
Was a machinist? He listened to and said that my problems was when
They put the rear end together there was torque in the metal and that
Someday it would come out with no problems. While I was going to Prep
School I went to the CBPO for something and when I backed out of the
Parking lot, it popped and from that day on there was never any
Problems with noise again. Going through Prep School was about like
Being in Basic Training, you do not use most of your stuff as it is
Fixed for laying out for inspection and you live out of you car or
Whatever.

Well we had traded the Hillman Husky for a 1957 ford and it did not
work out so we went to the Ford Place (which was right across the
Street) and bought a 1960 Ford Falcon. It was light blue and a real
Good car. We had the packers come and pack up you household goods and
Hit the road for California. That was right after Donald Ray Rogers
Was born (25 June 1961) and it was hot. We went to El Paso and to see
Her mother before we left. I don't remember whether we went to East
Texas or not. We done a usual when we traveled and that is to get
Some food for us and the kids to eat on the road and left out down
Highway 80. Some place in California we stopped on the side of the
Road and got under a mesquite bush and spread a blanket on the ground
And s stayed a few hours (rested) during the heat of the day. The
Only real problem was getting milk for Donald and keeping it from
Spoiling and his diapers were a problem too. We did not use
Disposable diapers, so she would change him and when we stopped to get
Gas, she would take the diaper to the bath room with her and wash the
Shit out of it and put in a pail (bucket) in the back of the Ford
Falcon and we hit the road again. We got to riverside and started
Looking for a place to live. We stayed in a Mote for a day or so and
I had bought a little transistor radio in El Paso. It was about the
Size of a package of cigarettes and a new thing. Technology had began
To change to miniaturization and they had an all news station on in
Los Angeles which is about 50 or 60 miles from Riverside and we left
It on that station. We found a house at 11939 north Indian in
Sunnymead California. It was a good modern house (the first we ever
Lived in) and had our household goods delivered. The couch we had
Bought in New Mexico was about worn out (from setting a beer on the
Right side arm) so we bought a new couch and a chair that leaned back
For me and we still kept the two green chairs that came with the first
Couch and had to buy a set of bunk bed for the Boys and se it up in
The back room and we were in business. I went to work at 15th Air
Force in Officer assignments and it was really not much of a job.
About two or three months they moved the Officer Assignment to
Headquarters SAC at Offutt AFB Nebraska and then really didn't have a
Job. We ended up consolidating the Officer and Airman Assignment
Branch under a little Lieutenant Colonel by the name of John Borders
Who was hard of hearing (he was also a little short shit and strutted?
Around like a fat Bantam rooster) and he could be a make work fool.
After it got to where there was noting to do, Doug played with the
Calculator all day. I played with the key punch and sorter and
Everyone played with the shoe shine machine the General had bought and
Put in the always (they had a walkway between the Old World war two
Buildings) between the World War II buildings. They were connected by
Sheds (walkways) in the space between the building and I could shine
My shoes every time I went up and down the hall on my piddly
Errands. The worst part was probably moving the crawling sprinkler
That went down by Colonel Borders' window (it was also his sprinkler)
So he could watch and call you on the intercom when it got close to
The end of the building and of course you co d get a wire brush and
Clean the legs on your desk and ever one else's too. Then we could
Get some soap and water and wash the desk or take the venetian blinds
Down and wash them. Fun, Fun, Fun. I began to want to get out of
That job. Right after I t there they; the General was having a
Commander's Conference and the wind got up and blowed the topsoil off
The potato fields around the base and at least half of it must have
Accumulated in the Officer's Club where he was to have his conference
In two days time. So the whole headquarters, including me had to go
To the Officer's Club and clean everything in sight, but he had his
Confrere on time and in a cleaner building than it was before the
Storm. We lived on the north side of town in the Orange G Groves and
Hardly got any dirt at all. At home we lived in the Orange
Groves and they had English Walnuts growing in Jesses yard across the
Street and Frantic Frannie lived up in front of us and had some pretty
Kids. The Bodo J Gerbigs lived on the next street and she was a nice
Lady and she weren't big as a good-sized kid. The home life part of
The job was great. We could lay in the front yard on lawn furniture
And Bar Be Que. almost every day. That is where I got on to the Bar B
Que. thing a it still shows up in the kids today. They are all good
Outside cooks. There was a vacant lot by Jesses house and he was a
Mexican (real name Jesus) and married to a white girl and they had a
Pretty little kid about five or six years old, with red hair We
Used to fire up the go-cart and wet down the ground beside his house
And let the kids play in the mud with the go cart and what a fun job
That was, but I think the grown up folks had more fun riding the thing
Than the kids did. We used to go up the road to the wheat fields in
The back of the house (actually the side of the house) and practice
Parallel parking, because after you were in California for a year you
Had to get a California Drivers License and we had to drive to Hemet
(Where they had dry lake that at one time had water in it) to take
The test and as usual when you take a test, you go overboard studying
For what turns out to be nothing. Got my California License and
Between the Louisiana License and that one I did not have to get an
Her one (except in England and Germany) until I retired in 1973.
Hamburger meat and chuck steak was three pounds for a dollar and eggs
Three dozen for a dollar and the high cost of living in California
Really killed us. I don't know why California had he reputation of
Being a high cost of living area because it was cheaper than New
Mexico and they had a better selection than New Mexico and the climate
Was just about the same. It was dry and there were plenty of rattles
Snakes if you got off the beaten path and we killed a big one a time
Or too. You could always get a dozen of turkey eggs for about $.15 and
Beer (102 brew) was about a dollar a six pack for 14 ounce cans and
They were the first ones I had ever seen. All in all except for the
Job, it s a choice assignment, as you could ride around to the new
Houses they had built in some of the outreach areas and they had some
Good ones too but we though about buying one but now I am glad we did
Not because we knew we did not want to live in California a. Staff
Sergeant Lachance and some of the other had purchased a place to live
When they moved there and they had trouble selling them when they were
Transferred to Offutt AFB, Nebraska, but not me. We were there about
Two years before I managed to get an assignment back to England and I
Don't regret it all,

Those were the good old days as they say of anything that you think of
When you think of it after the fact. We bought a new stereo set and
Skeeter bought the old lady a sewing machine (Necchi) and we got new
Cameras. She was having trouble getting her pay for her old man dying
(Indemnity - line of duty and all that shit you know) but I wrote
Senator (then) Lyndon Baynes Johnson a letter and in a short while
(Short minute) all was taken care of and she got her money. We went
To Yarmouth by the sea one time and took some fried chicken to eat and
Other goodies and one the way home we stooped beside a AAA or RAC both
Off the highway and ate dinner. I got a picture of Sherry eating a
Chicken bone (leg I think) and Skeeter trying to change her diaper.
She was nekid from the waste down, and looks just like a real girl
Ought to look. I used to take them to a Sand Pile (actually where the
Used to have a pit where the collected sand) and let them climb up and
Down. I don't suppose it was over 30 foot high and all sand and all
Four of the bigger kids had a ball playing on the sand pile and this
Big kid probably had a bigger time than any of them. I was good to be
Able to go to the fish and chip shop about a block from the house and
For 2 shillings and 6 pence ($.35) get enough fried fish and fried
Potatoes to feed three adults and four kids all they could eat and it
Was good too. You could buy a brace of Pheasants for ten shillings
($1.40) and one time I ran over two of them on the way home from work
And we cleaned, fried and ate them too. Nothing proud about this old
Boy and I know how to dress a chicken as I had seen Ma do it enough
When I was little. I remember the night they got to England. They
Flew over on a Boeing 707 to London Airport and I caught the train
Down the night before and spent my time on the train with a Gallon of
Quante wine and got to London on the middle of the night in not too
Good of shape and I had on a wool sweater that the old lady had
Knitted for me and I was walking around Picadilly Circus yaking at the
Whores and feeling their pussies and talking shop (and no I did not
Fuck one of them) and was I was walking around the corner, a pigeon on
To of the building shit and it hit me on the shoulder and you talk
About being embarrassed, I was. I didn't have anything to wipe it off
With and I finally used my hand and then washed my hand and there on
My shoulder was a brown spot where the pigeon had shit on me and of
Course you think everybody you walk by is looking at that spot and
Knows what has happened to you. I finally went out to the airport
Just about daylight and found out which terminal they were coming into
And then had to go across the field to wait for them. They got there
About daylight or maybe a little later and I hustled them into a taxi
Cab and away we went to the train station to catch a train back to
Newmarket. I think they got something to eat at the train station,
But as they had been feed on the airplane, they were not too hungry.
We got to Newmarket and then called the old lady who came down with
The Hillman Husky and picked us up. Her household goods (clothes)
Came in to the base and we were in business in a New York minute.

I suppose you can say that all good things must come to an end.
Skeeter went back to the land of the big PX and round doorknobs via
One of the Atlantic Steamships still making passage at the time and
She went to South Hampton and caught her boat (ship) back to the
United States. I think we took her down there but don't really
Remember, as all that I can remember is eating a roast beef dinner at
A cafe in Southampton and it was not seasoned to my liking, but then I
Really don't care too much for beef regardless of how it is fixed. We
Got ready to go and the movers came an packed up (but I think we
Packed up most of the stuff ourselves) including a new set of china
That had been bought through the Post Exchange or Base Exchange or
Navy Service Store, whichever you prefer to call it as they all sells
The same thing and at about the same price, which generally beats the
Civilian price by enough to make it worth you while to get it there
And at that time we were brains washed enough to think that if it came
From the Base Exchange it was better than the other stuff that comes
From the Civilian Market. Once they picked up our stuff we went to
Mildenhall and stayed in the Dependent Transient quarters until we
Went and caught the big old four engine (reciprocating engines) plane
Back to the United States. It lost an engine somewhere over the
Atlantic Ocean on the way back after we left Lajes in the Azores where
We stopped in the middle of the night and ate at the mess hall and got
Some milk for the baby bottles (Vicki was still on a bottle at that
Time) and left for McGuire Air Force Base, New Jersey. We go there
Some time the next day and done our usual of going through customs and
Declaring anything that we had bought and that was not a problem,
Because we were too poor to have bought anything that was expensive
Enough to pay customs duty on. From there we went to Trenton New
Jersey (on the local bus system) to the train station and caught the
Train for New Orleans, to pick up the Hillman Husky that we had
Shipped from Southampton England a month or so before.

We got into New Orleans about 10:00 p. m. and as usual Vicki did not
Have any dry diapers. This was about the time they first came out
With disposable diapers. We caught a taxicab to some fourth rate
Hotel (could not afford anything fancy on the pay I drew) and when we
Got settled in we (she) decided that Vicki could not make it through
The night without some more diapers. Well I got out and started
Walking down the street look for a drug store that was open at night,
As they usually had disposable diapers back in them days. Well I did
Not know where I was going so I walked through some pretty rough
Looking neighborhoods and was proposition by at least three Negro
Whores before I found and drug store and bought some diapers and went
Back to the hotel. The next morning we went to the New Orleans docks
And picked up old "Bessie Jane" (the Hillman Husky) and started on our
Trip to Walker Air Force Base, New Mexico, which was in Roswell and a
SAC station that I had drawn upon leaving England. SAC had forecast
Us for rotation and back them days once in SAC always in SAC because
They controlled all the assignments for officers and airmen (except of
Course the Colonels) and maybe some of them too I don't remember just
How the system worked at that time, if I ever knew. We put $3.10
Worth of gas in the Husky and started and it started missing. We
Stopped at a service station and they cleaned the plugs as the battery
Had come loose in its mounting and splashed battery acid (or water)
Down on the spark plugs and they were beginning to foul out. No more
Problems in that regard and about half way to Shreveport Louisiana, we
Stopped and got a Hamburger for dinner and hit the road. We got to
Shreveport Louisiana later in the afternoon (it is about 300 miles
From New Orleans) and stopped and saw Pearline and Walter Flemming who
Were still there after our three-year tour of duty in England. They
Were living about half a block from where they were living when we
Left to go to England. They had a couple of more kids by that time
And so did we. Cold winter nights in England are conducive to making
Babies, especially when you don't have much else to do, although
England had a good Class Six store (Liquor Store) and hooch was just
Over a dollar a bottle and not more than $3.00 for Johnny Walker Black
Label Scotch for a fifth. We then left Shreveport and headed for Ma's
House and got to go over interstate 20 for the first time since we had
Left three years before and they had not even started construction.
You could go from Bossier City to the Outskirts of Shreveport
Louisiana in about 30 minutes where it used to take almost two hours
To go the same distance. We got to Ma's house over in Center Point,
Just about three Miles east of Tatum Texas in about an hour. At that
Time she had done sold the old place out of Beckville Texas to Tilford
Rogers and moved over to Aunt Zellas place and moved into the old
Store building (Cecil Murray had a country store before he died) and
It was fixed up with a little building outback adjoining the old store
Building where you could get to the house by going through the second
Bathroom.


[#1.ftw]

Beverly Ann Brooks Rogers daughter of Mattie Laura Carr and Robert Lee
Brooks and wife of Durwin Ray Rogers.


Born on the Rio Grande River at Pilares Texas across the river from
Pilares Mexico where the whole family lived at that time by her Grand
Father and Mother in an adobe house. We had a family reunion at the
96 Ranch in1984 and there was about 300 or more people there.
I was a new ham at the time and was hot on two meters. Jimmy Dean is
The only kid who went with us. Donald was going to go but has just
Got married and had more important things to do. You

Notes for D
URWIN RAY ROGERS:

Durwin Ray Rogers enlisted in the United States Navy on November 27,
1951 at Albuquerque New Mexico, having enlisted in Amarillo Texas and
was discharged at Treasure Island, San Francisco California on April
30, 1955 in the grade of Boatswains Mate Third Class and was
transferred to the reserve and stay in the reserve until he enlisted
in the United States Air Force on June 6, 1955 in El Paso Texas and
went to Barksdale AFB Louisiana for the first duty station. After
going to RAF Mildenhall near New Market England, then to Walker AFB in
Roswell New Mexico and then to March AFB California outside of
Riverside California, then back to RAF Upper Heyford in England and
then to Lindsay Air Station in the City of Wiesbaden Germany, and then
Back to Randolph AFB Texas and then Back to Barksdale AFB Louisiana
where he retired in the grade of Master Sergeant on March 1, 1973. At
the time of retirement he was granted 30 percent Service Connected
Disability. This was subsequently raised to 50 percent, 60 percent
and finally 90 percent (unemployable) on January 31, 1996. He has and
is till working for 100 percent Service Connected and disability from
Social Security. He has an appointment with the Administrative Law
Judge in Longview Texas on October 11, 1996. If this approved it will
be a pretty good increase in the $1979.00 from the Veterans
Administration each month and $648.00 from regular Social Security
received each month. I am worth it so let it all come in. The
appointment in 1996 was cancelled and rescheduled for 6 January 1997.
I made this one and did not impress the Administrative Law Judge at
all so now it is back in their (Social Security's corner) and all I
have to do is wait on their disapproval.

The Social Security Appointment was cancelled or postponed and will be
rescheduled after the first of 1997 according to the Administrative
Law Judge in Shreveport Louisiana and I get a new judge because the
old one retired. I am still waiting on the Waco Veterans Regional
Office to send me the paper work for my appeal and they said it would
take at leas 90 days plus. Went before the Administrative Law Judge in
Marshall Texas on January 6, 1997 and the result,It are still not
received but are expected any day. As of February 3, 1997, I still
have not heard from the Administrative Law Judge in Shreveport
Louisiana.

Durwin Ray Rogers enlisted in the United States Navy on November 27,
1951 at Albuquerque New Mexico, having enlisted in Amarillo Texas and
was discharged at Treasure Island, San Francisco California on April
30, 1955 in the grade of Boatswains Mate Third Class and was
transferred to the reserve and stay in the reserve until he enlisted
in the United States Air Force on June 6, 1955 in El Paso Texas and
went to Barksdale AFB Louisiana for the first duty station. After
going to RAF Mildenhall near New Market England, then to Walker AFB in
Roswell New Mexico and then to March AFB California outside of
Riverside California, then back to RAF Upper Heyford in England and
then to Lindsay Air Station in the City of Wiesbaden Germany, and then
Back to Randolph AFB Texas and then Back to Barksdale AFB Louisiana
where he retired in the grade of Master Sergeant on March 1, 1973. At
the time of retirement he was granted 30 percent Service Connected
Disability. This was subsequently raised to 50 percent, 60 percent
and finally 90 percent (unemployable) on January 31, 1996. He has and
is till working for 100 percent Service Connected and disability from
Social Security. He has an appointment with the Administrative Law
Judge in Longview Texas on October 11, 1996. If this approved it will
be a pretty good increase in the $1979.00 from the Veterans
Administration each month and $648.00 from regular Social Security
received each month. I am worth it so let it all come in. The
appointment in 1996 was cancelled and rescheduled for 6 January 1997.
I made this one and did not impress the Administrative Law Judge at
all so now it is back in their (Social Security's corner) and all I
have to do is wait on their disapproval.

The Social Security Appointment was cancelled or postponed and will be
rescheduled after the first of 1997 according to the Administrative
Law Judge in Shreveport Louisiana and I get a new judge because the
old one retired. I am still waiting on the Waco Veterans Regional
Office to send me the paper work for my appeal and they said it would
take at leas 90 days plus. Went before the Administrative Law Judge in
Marshall Texas on January 6, 1997 and the result, It are still not
received but are expected any day. As of February 3, 1997, I still
have not heard from the Administrative Law Judge in Shreveport
Louisiana.


                  DURWIN R. AND BEVERLY A. ROGERS
P. O. BOX 266
PANOLA TEXAS, 75685-0266

TELEPHONE: 903-766-3635


1.       My name is Durwin Ray Rogers and I was born on May 22, 1934 in the little railroad switch by the name of Flanagan and it is close to Tatum Texas and My mother Effie May Singletary died of Uremic Poisoning when I was three days old. As my maternal grandparents were unable to care for me (no money and the depression) my paternal grandmother Mrs. Myrtie Etta Grimes Rogers, walked from Crystal Farms where the lived after the loss of their home in Martins Creek Bottom on the Hemby place and got me and carried me home (Back to Crystal Farms) on one hip and raised me until in went into the United States Navy on 27 November 1951. My sister says that her husband (John Calvin Rogers) was opposed to the move but she over ruled him. Thank God for that. When I was a young feller, prior to school age, which at that time was six years of age and you had to be six before the first of September of the year in which you started to school, I remember having an argument with John Charles Murray, my first cousin and the oldest of the grand kids of Myrtie Etta (Grimes) Rogers and John Calvin Rogers. We were standing in the door of Ma's new house about Three and a half miles West of Beckville Texas and arguing about whether ants were called ants or isints. Charles being the well educated and first grand child (he was born on the 15th Day of January 1934 and I was born on the 22nd of May of 1934) there fore he was older and wiser than me and besides that his father Cecil John Murray ran a grocery business out of his old green van and probably kept half the people (rural people) in that part of East Texas alive by selling them groceries on credit. I also remember ( Ma and her kids and Jimmy Armstrong's mule)that one of the neighbors over a mule who ran loose and eat grass when and wherever he pleased. Well Ma had some cows and had fenced her 25 acres of inherited land, the land where her youngest son Tilford now lives (he bought it from her about the time I went into the Navy or just after). I remember Tilford taking me to the Beckville School for registration and letting me look at the play house the Teacher had constructed in the first grade classroom at that time. I thought it was the greatest thing that I had ever seen in my whole life. It had real store bought toys and stuff in it, although I suspect the most of it was girl stuff. When I started to school in 1940, the war was just beginning and the United States had not entered it yet (officially) as Pearl Harbor did not occur until 7 December 1941 (a day which will live in infamy) according the then President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. One time one of Ma's old cows got down and could not get back up. Uncle Steve and Tilford built a sling to get her on her feet and it had four poles and a piece of canvas to go under her belly and the got up in that and she lived for a little while but finally died. I have often wondered what was the matter with her, but we did not have the money for a cow doctor even if there had been one available and I doubt if their was.
2      I don't remember an age but when I was small and I guess we lived on Crystal Farms west of Tatum Texas I remember riding down a red clay hill in a small wagon and it was pulled by two goats. Them I remember looking into the little red wagon and seeing two goat heads laying in it. Someone had killed them and cut their heads off and I suppose we ate them. Back during this period of time things were hard and everyone was luck just have three meals a day and if they had a job the were ahead of most. There were people in the soup lines world wide and this period of time was the incubation period of World War II. Every body was trying new political schemes to win the hearts of the hungry. A few nuts were politically astute and got into power and the end result was World War II and 50 years of cold war and posturing between the nations who survived world war II for the next 50 plus years.

3      Marion Rogers, just after him and Doris Rocquemore got married, was a whiskey drinker and use to tie on some good ones. One night I remember his comming into Mama's house and Doris and Sandra were already there, so I guess he was between jobs or something. He was drunk as a lord and they went out to the car and I supposed he had puked all over himself so Mama told Doris to get a wet rag and she got one of Sandra's wet diapers to wash him with and Mama got hot under the collar. Right after that he got drunk again and had a Car Wreck on the last big curve out of Beckville Texas and just before you get to the Rock Hill cutoff where Roy Vice lived after Texas Utilities bought him out. The wreck nearly killed him and if he ever drank anything after that I was never aware of it. Later on he lived about a half mile down the road, up to the left on top of a hill not to far from the Fire Lookout Tower and I had to drive his cows from over on the other side of Beckville to his new house, on foot and it took the biggest part of the day to accomplish. But then me and I had old Boot's (my faithful old part fiste, and part collie dog) to help me and we could drive cows just about anywhere we wanted to.


4      When I was a little feller not yet of school age, I remember going up to Uncles Steve's place and that was before he moved back to that part of the world. At the time some kinfolk's by the name of Martin Lived there. The had a son named Jay Dean Martin and a daughter named Nella Mae Martin. Things were not good back at that time, economically and they at times did not have groceries to put on the table. I remember at the time he would talking about eating and he would say "take a big drink of water" and that would make him feel like he had eaten. On day we went up there to see them and one of their kids had a little toy car that too me was beautiful so I put it in my pocket and took it home. When we got home Ma seen me playing with the little car and the shit hit the fan. I had to take it back up there and tell them that I had stolen it. That was one of the hardest things I ever had to do, but I told me that the number one thing you did not do was take something that belonged to someone else.

5      I remember when I was a small feller, but I guess I was about 12 or 13 years of age and when we were living with Mama and Rodney and some of the other grand kids lived and at their meals there also. When we went to bed at night, there would from two to three kids sleeping in the same bed. We slept in our under drawers and in the morning after I had got and got rid of my piss hard, I would jump back in the bed and snuggle up close to Rodney from behind and reach over him and play with his pecker and I don't remember it getting hard but this feel led to that feel and my pecker would get hard and I would get him backed up to me and stick my pecker up his asshole (corn holing him) and fuck him in the ass until I would cum. I called it reaching my compromise back in them days. Where did I get that word? I don't know but I fucked him in the ass many a time before I learned about pigs, cow's and chickens. I don't supposed it hurt him none as he was married two times and had two kids and on top of that he only had one ball from riding a horse right after he had the mumps.

6      When we used to set around the house and the old folks would tell some tall tales. Whether they were true or not I will leave to the reader to determine. They said at one time the kids (some of Mama's) were walking back from a dance and were walking down an old country lane with tree almost lapping over the road in the top. While strolling down this road the heard a noise and the whole lane lit in colored lights of every color. It scared the hell out of them and when they finally got enough courage to speak the light disappeared. I think they had been to an old country dance. Back in those days Mama played the fiddle and all the kids played some kind of instrument and they were always in demand to go and play for a country dance. One time I had to go to Aunt Lockey Higginbotham's house to get some matches because we had run out. We had been listening to ghost tales I was scared of the dark any way. When I got back to grimes lane (right by our house) Tilford Rogers had rolled up in a sheet and lay down on the road and he rolled down the incline to the road, and I'll bet I didn't hit the ground with my feet a dozen time until I was at the house.

7      Also when comming out of the River Bottom the were walking up a trail that was made by cows. In the distance they saw a stump setting right in the middle of the trail. As they got closer, the dogs they had with them got behind them. The stump jumped off the trail and disappeared. It done that three or four times before they got to the house and they decided it was a Panther trying to size them up and all they had was a .22 rifle with them and were scared to shoot it. There were at the time I was small and still to this day from time to time you can hear a "panther" scream. One time when I was little and the rest were in a cotton field chopping cotton and the field had a rail fence around it. A panther came over the fence and I remember it jumping over the fence and the rest of us lay down on the ground. I suppose we thought we could hide from it. Although a panther screaming is bad enough to scare the hell out of you, we were laying in bed one night (Ma and me) and I heard a fox bark. I had never heard one bark before and it scared me silly. I finally got up enough courage to ask Ma "what is making that noise" and she told me it was a box barking. I have heard them since, but they never scared me like that one did.

     
8      When I was about four or five years of age my Uncle Tilford Rogers was going to Claude Jenkin's Store which was almost or maybe a mile up the road and I wanted to go with him, but Mama said no as there was an old Brahma (Brimmer) bull of Elive Tompkin's out in the road between our house and the (Claude Jenkins) store. Well Tilford left and I went right behind him. I slipped off and was going to follow him to the store. I went off down though the pasture and climbed through the fence and up the road I went. About half was there, sure enough the Bull was in the middle of the road bellowing and pawing the dirt, so I got out of the road and climbed the bank and hid from him behind some Sweet Gum bushes. I stayed there until Tilford came back down the road and I climbed down and went back to the house with him. Well when we got to the branch (about a hundred yards or so from the house) I saw Mama out in the road. She had missed me and was looking for me. As we got closer to the house I saw her go the side of the road and pull up a persimmon sprout. Well I knew right then I was going to get a whipping. For anyone who don't know about persimmon switches (sprouts) they have a root on them that is just about as long the top is. Well the closer we got to the house, the more I began dreading the whipping I knew I was going to get and deserved. I started running from one side of the road to the other and when she got to where we were she started whipping me with that switch and I kept running. In front of the house was a high bank (or least it was high for a little guy to climb) and I started up the bank as it was closer to the house that way and I thought she would stop when we got to the house. I kept sliding back down the bank and she kept hitting me with that switch and I will never forget that whipping as long as I live and I never ran off from home again either. Where I hid behind the sweet gum bushes was in front of a big stand of pine trees (there must have been at least 100) and in the middle of these pine trees was a spring. Elvie Tompkins dug it out and put in a regular well curb in it so that his cows had water the year around. We used to stop and drink at this spring especially during the war when all the sweets you could get at the store was ludens cough drops and after eating a few when you drank water it felt like ice water and we used to stop there and get a drink of water with a chew of chewing tobacco in your mouth. You drank the water with the chew of tobacco in you mouth and you felt like you had the world by the tail and a down hill pull.

     

9      Just before I started to school we had mule problems. We had an old log mule named "Mike" who had been used in the log woods snaking logs all of his useful life and we got him to plow the garden. You could hook to the plow and flat brake (my uncles could) the garden and potato patch and run the scooter stock in the garden to run out the middles of the vegetables that were up and growing. He was also used to pull the sled when there was anything to move that was too heavy to carry. The only problem with old "Mike" was that he hated my uncles. He probably just didn't like to work and knew what was comming. When they would put him in the cow pen and try to catch him he would run to the corner and start kicking with both feet each time they tried to put the bridle on him. They would call me and I would go to the cow pen and walk up to old "Mike" and pull on his mane and his head would come down and then they could come up to him and put the bridle on him and use him to plow the garden or whatever they were catching him for. He done good in plowing but having snaked logs all his life he had a tendency to want to got down the same row ever time, as that is the way they done when in the log woods. Sometimes, after the corn got about waist high, they would have to tie a toe sack to the bridle to keep him from taking a bite out of the corn as he waked down the row. As I got older I used to ride him up to Uncle Steve's house and back, but by that time he had got so old he would stumble if you rode him in a trot. He was gentle with me (I guess he liked me) and I could pull his left front leg up and use it to get on him as he was a lot taller than I was. I used to pull that leg up, get a handful of mane and up I would go. He finally died in the meadow across the branch (by the swimming hole, where we crossed the branch) from the house and I remember how he look laying on the far side of the meadow with the buzzards eating away. I guess he is in Mule Heaven now and I wish him well because I really liked (loved) that old Mule and I hope the feeling was mutual.

10      When I started to school we rode the Bus to and from School. It was an old truck that had a home made school bus bed on it, and was painted yellow with Beckville Texas Independent School Bus on the sides, with benches down the sides and a double bench in the middle with a frame for a back like a chair down the middle of it all the way to the back door, which was there for emergency exit or entrance I suppose. At that time that kind of stuff was the farthest thing from my mind. Back then I pissed the bed every night of the year, and that meant in the morning I had to get up and have a bath before I went to school. We did not have an inside bathroom and the toilet (shitter) was out behind the chicken house (a two Holer) where we done our business and any bathing was done in a number 3 wash tub and was done inside the house if it was cold (we got in front of the fire place ) and outside the house if it was summertime, at least that is how the kids done it. I remember once we caught the itch and could not get rid of with Sulphur and grease (the usual remedy) and Ma boiled some bull Durham sacks in the wash pot and gave us a bath the tobacco water and it got rid of the itch (and burned your skin like hell) and she used the tobacco sacks to piece together to make a quilt linings. I don't know what arrangements the grown up folks made but one thing that I am sure of is that it couldn't have been much more elaborate that what the kids used, because we simply did not have anything else. Sometimes I wonder if they really washed very much at all because I do not remember them doing it and I am sure if it was a daily or weekly ritual, I would have taken notice. The only thing I can remember is sometimes Mama smelled like piss and I told her that one time, and got the mind my own business for my trouble, because both her and Aunt Theresa Mae (Grimes) Lewis both smelled like stale piss at times, pretty severely. But lets face it, we were country folks, and the only people around were kinfolk's and not to many of them because back in those days the war was on and we had no gasoline and for that matter we did not even have a car to use, much less own. Marion Rogers (my uncle) who did not participate on World War II as he was already married and had one child (Sandra Rogers) and at the time was working in the Ship Yards in Houston and for that reason I guess was not drafted, or he may have had some physical disability but if he did I never knew about it. Marshall Rogers, Cecil Rogers and Tilford Rogers, all got drafted into the Army and Mama had a flag with three stars on it (If a kid was killed in the war the star was changed to a yellow one) that she hung up the front room window for the world to see and to know that she had three sons in the World War II. Marion, before and after the war lived next door in the old house with great big Walnut and Hackberry trees in the yard, and there was big Hickory Tree between that house and ours, so we plenty of Hickory Nuts and Walnuts ever fall, and for some reason, no water, so they all came to the house and got water for drinking and whatever else they used water for I suppose. It belonged to Mrs. Annie Brasher. I remember sitting on the porch at Marions house and hearing Mama and Uncle Steve (Steven Marion Grimes) talk about the bombing that Germany was doing in Poland and how the little children were buried under the rubble and their feet and hands sticking out. What an impression that made on me and a strike against good old Adolph Hitler.

11      The biggest tragedy that happen locally at that time was Mr. Ed Taube (a German Farmer and Saw Mill Operator) was mowing his meadow for hay and his young son Warren Ed Taube wanted to help and was told to go to the house out of the way. Well he did not and as the old man was comming down the meadow with a horse drawn mower the little one hid behind a small sweet gum bush and the old man did not see him and ran over the bush and cut one of the little ones legs off (his right one). He later played football (but not varsity football)with one leg and was a pretty good football player too. Before the War old Ed Taube was just another farmer scratching for a living over on the outskirts of the place called the big woods. After the war with Germany started he was an item of suspect until the war was over and I don't suppose he sabotaged any thing and used his ration stamps just like every other American Citizen. He also had a planning mill and would plane lumber for people. Doris Rogers had some Cedar wood and wanted it made into a Cedar Chest, (Cedar wood repels moths) and she wanted Uncle Steve to make it for her. He told her he would but if she took the wood to Mr. Ed Taube for planing he would not do it. Well she took the wood to Mr. Ed Taube's and he planed and Uncle Steve refused to make her a Cedar Chest just like he said he would. I just think the did not want to make it anyway, because working for family, the expect you to work for nothing. I have since been told that he eventually did make a cedar chest for her.
12      We lived in a four room house with no toilet, just living and bedroom for the front room (The living room also doubled as a bed room.) To the left of that room was Ma's and my bedroom (and all the other grand kids when they were around which was most of the time). In the northern part of the house was the kitchen and wood cook stove and no ice box (although later after I left and went into the Navy) she did purchase a Butane Servell Gas Refrigerator. In addition to that a heater was installed in the living room and a later a Butane Cook Stove was installed in the kitchen. Electric lights were also installed in the house after I left and went to Boy's Ranch or in the Navy, I don't remember which. We used coal oil to put in the lamps for light after dark and got our coal oil from Claude Jenkin's store up the road about a mile and it was $.10 a gallon and hard (small handle) for a little kid to carry home. We had a garden and a potato patch (in front of the potato patch) was a smoke house, but all we ever used it for was a spare junk room for feed and jars and stuff you did not used every day) and raised most of our vegetables and got some pork from Uncle Steve from time to time as he always had hogs and killed them each winter. I don't know why he moved from Dallas back to his old place (The Grimes Home Place). I suppose he had some problems with his wife Beatrice (Langley) Grimes while he was living in Dallas and just got up and come home. He was crippled in his right leg from some industrial accident I think, as he was a carpenter and a very good cabinet maker to, from all accounts. I remember he made rocking chairs for his house and Tilford carrier some springs up to his house when he moved back and he carried them on his back as we had no other way to moved things of that type (we later had a sled and an old mule) from place to place. The other room was a back bedroom (to the left of the kitchen) which as I grew older became my room. It had from one to two beds, and a hole in the ceiling so you could get up the overhead if necessary, depending on who was living at home at the time. None of the walls were sealed on the inside. Just the outside boards and a bunch of boards up for partitioning the rooms from each other. Mama used cardboard boxes and tacks to seal the rooms in an attempt to keep out some of the cold. At first we did not have up a permanent ceiling but later on one of the boy's bought some lumber and Uncle Steve put up the ceiling. I think they build the old clap board house from scratch as I remember them talking about going to the river bottom and cutting some Cyprus trees to make the joists and blocks under the house which set up off the ground enough so that a kid could crawl under with no problem and that is where Old Boots (the dog) and cats slept and stayed out of the weather when it was inclement. Once when I had some little kittens, the dog bit one and it ran up under the hose and I went under there to console it. I reached for it and it bit a hole in my finger and I had to prize his jaws open to get him off me. So much for consoling the cat; the next time as far as I am concerned the dog can bite his head off. All in all it was not a bad old place and was well used over the years. When I got in school, I remember we had a battery powered radio that set in the front room and an antenna outside in the field to the side of the house. On Saturday nights the neighbors like Irene Hill and so forth would come over (walk) as they live (lived in Mrs. Annie Brashears house, the same one Marion lived prior to and after the war) about one hundred yards down the road in the same house (Mrs. Annie Brashears place) that Marion Used to live in and listen to the Grand Old Opry. That was big time stuff back in those days, as well as listening to Sky King, Red Rider, The squeaking door, Intersanctuim mysteries, and Tom Mix on the radio and I remember when President Roosevelt died and when Truman announced the first Atomic Bomb that was dropped on Hiroshima Japan and at White Sands New Mexico and also seeing the first jet airplane that went though the sky leaving vapor trails and the story that went around about the pilot who was stopped by the police for speeding and let go because he told them he usually went around 600 miles an hour in the airplane. True ?? I don't know but it made a good story. Rodney and Larry Wilkerson, Sisters two kids usually spent most of their lives with Mama too because Sister and Lee Wilkerson would fight like cats and dogs and stay apart more than they stayed together and the result was that the kids came to stay with Mama and me most of the time. Two more mouths was nothing to feed, but what the hell, Mama made two pans of biscuits every morning and what we did not eat went to the chickens and dogs, so how were two more kids going to make a difference anyway. She had a garden and worked it religiously and we canned all summer, peas, beans and put up potatoes to use in the winter time and corn and everything it took to feed us kids and her kids who were in and out as the job market got kinda tight after the conclusion of World War II. Marshall and his wife and step kids and the old man and Patsy and Mary. In fact they were there when the old man killed his brother Marshall Rogers when I was about 12 or 13 years of age.
On the 14 of September 1955 after a year or over I got my schedule for the last physical for compen



     
Children of B
EVERLY BROOKS and DURWIN ROGERS are:
153. i.   MICHAEL ALLEN22 ROGERS, b. September 06, 1956, Barksdale AFB La.
154. ii.   JIMMY DEAN ROGERS, b. December 25, 1957, Wimpole Park USAF Hospital England.Cambridgshire.
155. iii.   VICKI JANIECE ROGERS, b. May 11, 1959, Wimpole Park USAF Hospital England Cambridgshire.
156. iv.   DONALD RAY ROGERS, b. June 25, 1961, Roswell New Mexico.
  v.   TAMMY LYNN ROGERS1, b. February 28, 1964, Burdrop Park USAF Hospital, Burdrop England Wiltshire1; m. (1) ERIC SWANSON1, July 18, 1983, Longview, Texas1; b. , Longview, Texas1; m. (2) STEVEN EUGENE FISHER1, March 20, 1992, Janesville, Wisconsin1; b. August 23, 1959, Janesville, Wisconsin1.


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