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PEDIGREE QUESTIONS UNANSWERED

THE SAVAGE FAMILY'S HUGUENOT HISTORY AND QUESTIONABLE LINEAGE

According to the document, "A Savage Family Ancestral Pedigree", written by Jean Savage Lichtenwald, Abraham Sauvage was born at St. Aligis, Picardy, France. On October 17, 1677, he married Marie Bridou, of St. Algis, in London. They were both French Huguenots. Both died in Ireland.

ABRAHAM SAVAGE Abt.1646
Married Marie Bridou

Extracted from page 94 of the History of the Huguenot Emigration to America by Charles W. Baird, D.D., Two Volumes in One:

".....Abraham Sauvage, of St. Algis, in Picardy, came to Boston......Abraham Sauvage, "veuf, natif de St Algi pre's de Guise," was married October 17, 1677, in French Church, Threadneedle Street, London, to Marie Bridou. Abraham Sauvage was in Boston, Massachusetts, September 4, 1692......"

International Genealogical Index (R) - 1994 Edition - Version 3.06, British Isles: Indicates marriage between Abraham Savage and Mary Mrs Bridow on December 25, 1677 at London, London, England.

International Genealogical Index (R) - 1994 Edition - Version 3.06, British Isles: Indicates he may have had two children, Marj, baptized 8 Mar 1646, and Daniel, baptized 12 Dec 1647, both at the Threadneedle Street French Huguenot, London, London, England.

On page 94 of the History of the Huguenot Emigration to America by Charles W. Mair, D.D., Two Volumes in One, it states, ".....Abraham Sauvage, of St. Algis, in Picardy, came to Boston......Abraham Sauvage, "veuf, natif de St Algi pre's de Guise," was married October 17, 1677, in French Church, Threadneedle Street, London, to Marie Bridou."]

Could Daniel Sauage, Abt. 1616, and Ester Rau have been the parents of Abraham Savage who married Marie Bridow?

The French Protestant Church of London, 8 & 9 Soho Square, London, England W1V 5DD is the former Threadneedle Street French Huguenot Church in London that existed in the early 1600s. According to church records the following events took place:

(NOTE: The spelling in the following varies, perhaps due to erroneous recordings made by the Threadneedle Street French Huguenot Church in London, or when transcribing by the Church of the Ladder Day Saints (LDS).

On 21 Feb 1632, a Daniel Sauuaige and Ester had a son christened named Pierre.

On 1 Dec 1633, a Daniel Sauuage had a daughter christened named Ester.

On 20 Dec 1635, a Daniel Sauuage had a daughter christened named Judith.

On 16 Sep 1638, a Daniel Sauuage and Ester had son christened named Daniel.

On 14 May 1643, a Daniel Sauuage and Ester Rau had a son christened named Daniel.

On 8 Mar 1646, a Daniel Sauuage and Ester Rau had a daughter christened named Marj.

On 12 Dec 1647, a Daniel Sauuage and Ester Rau had a son christened named Abreham.

On 3 Feb 1656, a Daniel Sauuage and Ester had a son christened named Samuel.

The above, underscored and highlighted Abreham, is likely to be the same individual mentioned in the following church entry:

On 29 Sep 1678, an Abraham Sauuage and Marie Boidou had a son christened named Esaie.

5 Oct 1679, Abraham Sauuage and Marie Boidou had a son christened named Jeremie.

As far as I could determine, there was no church record of their marriage. However, paragraph 2 above states, they were "married October 17, 1677, in French Church, Threadneedle Street, London, to Marie Bridou."

If, as stated in paragraph 2, it is true, that Abraham went to Boston, how could he and Marie have lived and died in Ireland? Unless, he went to Ireland and did not go to Boston. Perhaps this Abraham is not related. If he is related by some unknown circumstance, what happened to his brothers and sisters?

However, according to Jean Savage Lictenwald, Abraham and Marie Sauvage were the parents of Edward (Ebenezer) Savage. Another source states that an Edward (Ebenezer) Savage was a French Huguenot, a native of France, who was driven from thence and took refuge in Ireland, where he later died. He married Sarah Hamilton whose father was Captain Hamilton who fought in the Battle of Boyne in 1690. Edward and Eleanor had three sons, Edward, John and his twin brother Abraham. John and Abraham were born in Ireland in 1706 or 1707. I can clearly link John Savage to my family tree.

All of the above dates were before the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685. It APPEARS these individuals might have traveled from France to England for the christening of their children, and the marriage of Abraham and Marie Bridou (correct spelling believed to be Bridou), or they were living in England.

Other references state that ABRAHAM and MARIE SAUVAGE, French Huguenots, were driven from France upon the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes. They took refuge in Ireland. I have no indication as to what happened to the remaining family.

International Genealogical Index (R) - 1994 Edition - Version 3.06, British Isles: Indicates marriage between Abraham Savage and Mary Bridow on December 25, 1677 at Saint Dunstan, Stepney, London, England.

International Genealogical Index (R) - 1994 Edition - Version 3.06, British Isles: Indicates marriage between Abraham Savage and Mary Mrs Bridow on December 25, 1677 at London, London, England.

International Genealogical Index (R) - 1994 Edition - Version 3.06, British Isles: Indicates he may have had two children, Marj, baptized 8 Mar 1646, and Daniel, baptized 12 Dec 1647, both at the Threadneedle Street French Huguenot, London, London, England.

Page 260 of the History of Princeton for Savage

The immigrant ancestor of this family Edward Savage was of Huguenot parentage. Edward and his twin brothers, John and Abraham, were the children of Abraham Savage, a French Huguenot, a native of France who was driven from thence and took refuge in Ireland, where he died. His widow became the second wife of Arthur Hamilton, whose first wife had died, leaving three daughters, Eleanor, Betsey and Martha Hamilton. They with the six children, emigrated to MA in 1717, settling in Rutland. In 1728 Edward Savage and wife Mary united with the church in Rutland.................."

Abraham and Marie had, at least, one more child, a son, I believe, was born in Ireland in 1678 who was named Edward (Ebenezer) Sauvage. Edward was born about 1678 in Ardstraw, Tyrone County, Ireland. He married Sarah Hamilton, daughter of Arthur (John) Hamilton.
What follows I am reasonably certain about. Edward Sauvage and his wife Eleanor Hamilton had three sons, Edward Savage born about 1707 at Loudoun, Scotland; Abraham and John (twins) born January 27, 1706 at Ardstraw, Tyrone County, Ireland.

Edward died and Sarah became the second wife of Arthur Hamilton (said to have been a Captain in the British Navy), whose first wife had died, leaving three daughters, Eleanor, Betsey and Martha Hamilton. They, with their six children, emigrated to Massachusetts in America in 1717, settling in Rutland, Massachusetts.

John was a child of about ten when he arrived in America. His mother, stepfather, stepsister Eleanor, brother Edward and his wife Mary and others are shown to have brought letters from Rev. Mr. Halyday, Presbyterian minister of the parish of Ardstraw in Ireland, and in 1728 were received into the Rutland Church Fellowship.

I hope my explanation has not been confusing. Any assistance that you can provide toward solving this mystery will be greatly appreciated. Again, I am only confident that the information on John and Abraham Savage is correct as I do have descendant information from them to-date.

In the copy I have of "Savage Family Ancestral Pedigree", compiled by Jean Savage Lichtenwald, there is an editorial note which is as follows:

"Editorial Note:

"One thing virtually all citizens of the United States share is the fact that we are descendants of immigrants. Some of our ancestors left their native country several generations before others, but no matter how long ago or how recently our people set out for the New World, they were all immigrants. Eventually, we, their descendants, must come to the water's edge and seek records from across the seas. There are some who wish only to prove their lines in America, but others will want to push into their origins as far back as possible. How can this be done?"

(1) "Those of us who trace to the American colonials can work back our ancestral lines for eight to twelve generations in this country. Then comes a break. Most of the first settlers come from Great Britain or Holland. A large majority were from England......"

(2) "English research is a field in itself, and because of the great difference in conditions, a vast amount of special knowledge is needed before the genealogist is equipped to be an expert or specialist in English research."

(3) "It is not to be expected that American genealogists could, without years of study and training, decipher the records written in a difficult abbreviated form of Latin and in mediaeval French."

(4) Through the years, many fictitious ancestral lines have been originated by well intentioned, professional genealogists. These have been reproduced on the authority of the work. One is mentioned briefly by Jacobus in his book and perhaps has a major bearing on the Savage lineage lo Royal Ancestry. His statement is as follows.

"Another dubious line is that of another Whitney immigrant, John of Watertown, Mass. Here a great deal of genuine research was done, and a beautiful book published containing the evidence in full. Unfortunately, the critical link in the pedigree is the identity of Thomas, supposed father of John, with Thomas son of Robert, third son of Sir Robert Whitney. The only evidence for this identity is a pedigree in the British Museum showing the claim of a later London Whitney to be heir male of the Whitneys of Whitney. The claim was not backed by any evidence and presumably was mistaken or fraudulent, for a careful analysis of available dates shows that the generations in the pedigree would have been incredibly short. If correct, a father and son must each have married at the unusual age of fifteen; and in view of this, the conclusion of the author cannot be accepted without stronger proof than this book presents."

(5) 'this link appears on chart  as Thomas Whitney, person , in the here reproduced Savage Family Pedigree.

(1) Harriet Stryker-Rodda, "How to Climb Your Family Tree", published by The Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1987, page 136.
(2) Donald Lines Jacobus, "Genealogy as Pastime and Profession", 2nd Edition, published by The Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1986, page 34.
(3) Ibid, page 34.
(4) Ibid, page 36.
(5) Ibid, page 38-39.

JER 02 Oct 1994"

The editorial note preparer suggests that there is concern about the possible faulty linkage in the pedigree connecting the family to Royal Ancestry. If anyone can help clarify this matter, your assistance is requested.


Urania (Sprague) Simmons

Another question has arisen regarding Urania (Sprague) Simmons, born about 1794, died July 4, 1850. She was married to William Savage, born April 30, 1800. I have been unable to fine out anything about Urania's ancestry.

Any clarification on this matter will be appreciated.


ORRIN E. SHARP, SR.
421 East Rolston Road
Linden, MI 48451-9457 USA
810-735-1552
ColonelOne@worldnet.att.net

HISTORICAL INFORMATION
PERTAINING TO THE

SAVAGE FAMILY GENEALOGY

Updated: March 17, 2000

Page 260 of the History of Princeton for Savage

The immigrant ancestor of this family Edward Savage was of Huguenot parentage. Edward and his twin brothers, John and Abraham, were the children of Abraham Savage, a French Huguenot, a native of France who was driven from thence and took refuge in Ireland, where he died. His widow became the second wife of Arthur Hamilton, whose first wife had died, leaving three daughters, Eleanor, Betsey and Martha Hamilton. They with the six children, emigrated to MA in 1717, settling in Rutland. In 1728 Edward Savage and wife Mary united with the church in Rutland.................."

Extracted from book, "History of Rutland, Worcester County, Massachusetts, by Jonas Reed, Worcester: Mirick & Bartlett, Printers. 1836"

"BY WHOM RUTLAND WAS PEOPLED

The first settlers of Rutland were principally from respectable families in the flourishing towns of Boston, Lexington, Concord, Sudbury, Marlborough, Framingham, Lancaster, Brookfield, and Emigrants from Ireland, several of whom brought letters testimonial of their church fellowship in Ireland.

They were persons of courage, enterprise and sentiment, possessing something of the spirit of the Pilgrims, left their native town or country, and bid farewell to friends, acquaintance, a father's house, a pleasant home, to settle in a howling wilderness, exposed by day and night, whether in hut or field, to the wily and cruel Indian, the lurking and ravinous bear and wolf. "A howling wilderness it was, where no man dwelt, the hideous yells of wolves, the shrieks of owls, the gobling of turkeys, and the barking of foxes was all the musick we enjoyed, no friends to visit, no soul in the surrounding towns all a dreary waste, and exposed to a thousand difficulties," no roads, mills, schools, or sanctuary. The nearest settled towns were Lancaster, Worcester, Leicester and Brookfield, and these but thinly peopled; as late as 1702, the town of Worcester was entirely depopulated, and in the spring of 1715, had only one family, Jonas Rice's."

"PRESBYTERIANS

The following persons brought Letters Testimonial of their being Communicants in Ireland; they were received into Church Fellowship in Rutland, viz.: Malkem Hendery, from Rev. Mr. Halyday, Presbyterian minister of the Parish of Ardstraw in Ireland, John Hamilton and wife, .....Edward Savage and wife,.....Eleanor, daughter of John Hamilton.....The Church of Christ in that place was on August 28, 1767, embodied in Presbyterian form."


"THE INDIANS

The inhabitants of Rutland were more or less exposed to the merciless Indians for more than thirty years, their guns were by their side in the house, in the field and in the Sanctuary. In 1723 the town voted to build a fort about the house the Re. Mr. Willard lived in; there were several other forts built in various places of the settlement, "such were the excitements, and such the temper of the red people; Their warfare opened a stream of blood that long continued to purple the land, and worked woe and misery for the helpless emigrants of New England. The destroyers were lurking around them in the vast forests, and no signal preceded the blow. The sudden incursion burst upon the settlements. The hoary head of the venerable father was dabbled in its own gore; the tresses of the maidens were blood stained; and the slumbers of the cradle were often exchanged for the dreamless sleep of eternity. The husbandman went out to cultivate his fields armed as if for battle; when he laid down to rest, the sword and musket were the companions of his pillow." "Such is the peculiar character of the savage temper, that time nor distance mitigates the spirit of revenge for supposed wrongs. In 1722 the Eastern Indians exasperated by some supposed encroachments on their lands, again took up the tomahawk. The war was carried on in a manner peculiarly bloody in the settlements within New Hampshire and Maine. Rutland although far removed from the scene of action, felt the fury of their vengeance. In the two succeeding years they continued to receive the most violent assaults from the barbarians. Several of the inhabitants were killed or captured, and among the former their minister."
Edward (Ebenezer) Savage Abt.1678
Married Mary Hamilton

Extracted from Immigrants to New England, 1700-1775, by Ethel Stanwood Bolton. Located at the Historical Collections of the Essex Institute, Vol. I.XVII, January, 1931, No. 1.

SAVAGE, Ebenezer, of Rutland, Mass; m. Mary Hamilton, Nov. 24, 1726, in Westboro, Mass. - Vital Records of Rutland, P. 190.

JOHN HAMILTON 1670
Married First ?
Married Second Mrs. Eleanor Savage

Article on John Hamilton of Rutland, Mass. and Some of His Descendants, by Jennie M. Patten (Loaned by Mrs. C. Hutton and copied by Luetta Eaton in 1957 for ,the Salem historical files.

JOHN Hamilton was born in the North of Ireland about 1670; died in Rutland, Mass., probably between May 8, 1745, when he signed his last deed, and June 5, 1748 when his daughter Eleanor and her husband Captain John Savage sold his (Hamilton) Lot No. 46 in Rutland. He probably lived with his youngest child Eleanor and for his care in his old age gave them his land in Rutland, but no deed conveying the property has been found in the Registry of Deeds office in Worcester, Mass..

JOHN HAMILTON by his first marriage in Ireland about 1693 had four daughters; Elizabeth born in 1694, Mary born in 1707; Martha date of birth not discovered, and Eleanor, born in 1707; and perhaps several sons not traced.

His first wife died after the birth of his daughter Eleanor in 1714, and between that date and 1716 he married, second, a Mrs. Eleanor Savage, widow of Edward Savage and a daughter of Captain Hamilton of the English Army, who had by her first marriage had three sons, Edward born about 1704 and twins John and Abraham born in 1706.

Edward Savage a French Huguenot was driven from France by the revocation of the Edict of Nantes and settled in Ireland where he married about 1700, a daughter of Captain Hamilton of the English Army, by whom he had three sons as herein above mentioned. Mr. Savage died and his widow about 1715 married John Hamilton.

This Hamilton-Savage family came to New England in 1716 and settled in Rutland, Mass..

The first record of the family in Rutland is when John Hamilton of Rutland purchased land there June 7, 1722 and on July 3, 1722 he bought Lot No. 46 in Rutland, which was the family home for twenty-five years.

In time this family separated. The eldest daughter Elizabeth Hamilton married in Boston, Mass., Feb 18, 1723 William Sloan of Palmer, Mass. And later went with her family to Lyme, New Hampshire, arriving there May 20, 1764.

The second daughter, Mary Hamilton, married her step-brother Edward Savage in Westboro, Mass. November 24, 1726 and lived and died in Rutland, Mass..

The third daughter, Martha Hamilton married in Rutland, Mass. March 26, 1734 Archibald McCollister (McAllister) born in Scotland, died in Salem County, New Jersey before February 7, 1765, when his son John McCollister was appointed administrator of his estate. His wife died in Salem County, New Jersey about 1758.

The fourth daughter, Eleanor, married in Rutland, Mass. January 15, 1733 her step-brother Captain John Savage of Rutland and Pelham, Mass. and Salem, N.Y..

John Hamilton and wife Eleanor brought letters of testimonial from their church in Ireland, and were received into church membership in Rutland about 1727. Before 1740 they withdrew and with others, organized the Presbyterian Church.

The following is from the Manuscript History of Washington County, N.Y. by Dr. Asa Fitch with additions and corrections by Jennie M. Patten:

The three brothers Capt. John Savage, Edward and Abraham came to America in 1716 with their step-father John Hamilton and family. The eldest, Edward Savage, settled in Rutland, Mass., Abraham and John twins were ten years of age when they came to America. Abraham settled in Chatham, N.Y..

It was said by Mrs. Crossett, daughter of Capt. John that the Savage family lived in Derry, Ireland, coming from France. (Evidently London derry).

Edward Savage married Nov. 24, 1726 his step-sister Mary Hamilton and settled in Rutland, Mass..

Abraham Savage married June 14, 1737 Mary Barnes and settled in Chatham, N.Y..

John Savage married June 15, 1733 his step-sister Eleanor Hamilton and settled in Rutland, Pelham, Mass. And Salem, N.Y..

Capt John Savage was born in Ireland in 1716 followed the sea in his younger days, sailing from Boston. He gradually accumulated property until he became the owner of a vessel, which he commanded, and finally the vessel was wrecked on the island of Cape Breton, his cargo and men lost and he barely escaped with his life. He thus lost all he possessed and abandoned the sea. He settled as a farmer in Rutland, Mass. Where he married his step-father's daughter Eleanor Hamilton; January 28, 1745, he purchased of Samuel Grey 100 acres of land in Pelham, Mass. And moved with his family to Pelham that same year.

June 5, 1748, Capt. John Savage and his wife Eleanor of Pelham, sold their land in Rutland, Mass. Including Lot No. 46 formerly owned by her father John Hamilton of Rutland.

October 6, 1766, Capt. John Savage sold his land in Pelham, Mass. To Nathan Livermore and the following spring (1767) removed with his family to Salem, New York, wherein he resided until his death January 27, 1792 aged 85.

Capt. John and Eleanor Hamilton Savage had four sons, John, Edward, James, Abram, and three daughters, Martha (Mrs John Grey, Jr.), Elizabeth (Mrs. Daniel McCleary) and Jane (Mrs. Crossett, or Grozier, named pronounced both ways). Of the sons, Abram died in Salem, New York Oct. 6, 1769 age 17 years.

JOHN SAVAGE 1706
(Twin of Abraham)
Married Eleanor Hamilton

Captain in the French Indian War and lost a leg.

Buried in a vault with Andrew Chamberlain's family.

Extracted from Immigrants to New England, 1700-1775, by Ethel
Stanwood Bolton. Located at the Historical Collections of the Essex Institute, Vol. I.XVII, January, 1931, No. 1.

SAVAGE, Capt., John, of Pelham, Mass.; from Ireland, in 1716; m. Eleanor Hamilton, Jan. 15, 1733; called brother of Edward and Abraham Savage. --- Contributed by Miss J. M. Potter.

Extracted from History of Washington County, New York

JOHN SAVAGE and his sons Edward and James came with New England colony, and were united in the Turner patent. They were from Pelham. Edward settled on the present Hatch place. James on the place next west. John Savage, father, was a seafaring man; had lost one leg in the naval service. Edward Savage had one son, John, the well-known chief - justice of the State, and one daughter, wife of the Rev. Mr. Sweetman, of Saratoga county.

Of the children of James, Abram settled in Salem; Thomas in Salem, afterwards moved to Argle. Daughters were Mrs. Edward Riggs, of Argle, Mrs. Thomas Clark, of Argle, and Mrs. John McMurray, of Salem. A daughter of Ralph Clark was the first wife of Schuyler Colfax.

Dr. James Savage, now of Argle, is a son of Abram, and another son was the late Professor Edward Savage of Union College.

Extracted from The Salem Book, Records of the Past and Glimpses of the Present, Prepared for Publication by a Group of Salem's Sons and Daughters, Salem, N. Y., The Salem Review Press, MDCCCXCVI . (1896)

Page 65, Old Families, SAVAGE.

The Savage Family is of French origin. They were driven from France by the revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685. They settled for a time in north of Ireland. Members of the family intermarried with persons of Scottish descent. A portion of the family came to America in 1717 and settled in Massachusetts. John Savage was appointed captain of a company of volunteers in 1758 and served under General Bradstreet in his expedition against Fort Fontenac and under General Abercrombie in the assault of Fort Ticonderoga. He removed to Salem in 1767 and died there in 1792, age 85......;

Capt. John Savage was born in Ireland in 1716 followed the sea in his younger days, sailing from Boston. He gradually accumulated property until he became the owner of a vessel, which he commanded, and finally the vessel was wrecked on the island of Cape Breton, his cargo and men lost and he barely escaped with his life. He thus lost all he possessed and abandoned the sea. He settled as a farmer in Rutland, MA where he married his step-father's daughter Eleanor Hamilton; January 28, 1745, he purchased of Samuel Grey 100 acres of land in Pelham, MA and moved with his family to Pelham that same year. June 5, 1748, Capt. John Savage and wife Eleanor of Pelham, sold their land Rutland, MA including Lot No. 48 formerly owned by her father John Hamilton of Rutland. October 6, 1776, Capt. John Savage sold his land in Pelham, MA to Nathan Livermore and the following spring (1767) removed with his family to Salem, New York, wherein he resided until his death January 27, 1792 aged 85 years.

The inscription on the tomb stone of Capt. John Savage is as follows:

"Near this stone are deposited the remains of Captain John Savage whose useful life (which heaven protected until an unusual length) was distinguished by the dangerous hardships and deliverances he experienced in a long service of adventures both by land and sea.

In recounting these to his latest moments he gratefully acknowledged the wisdom, goodness and power of Devine Providence; that he was attentive to the duties of religion, that he undaughtedly advocated the faith which he firmly believed that amidst the temptations and peculiarly incident to the stations of a seaman and soldier, he preserved an unsullied and exemplary character, diligently, discharging, the several duties of life was his distinction.

Mr. Savage was born in the Kingdom of Ireland about the year 1706, in his youth he emigrated to America and settled in the province of Massachusetts. In the year 1767 he with his family removed from Pelham, Mass. to this town (Salem) then an uncultivated wilderness. He died January 27, 1792 aged eighty-five years his earthly pilgrimage being ended in the certain hope of a blessed immortality. He rested in Jesus."

Capt. John and Eleanor Hamilton Savage had four sons John, Edward, James, Abraham and three Daughters Martha (Mrs. John Grey Jr.), Elizabeth (Mrs. Daniel McCleary) and Jane Mrs. Crossett (or Crozier) name pronounced both ways. Of sons Abraham died in Salem, New York Oct. 6, 1769 age 17 years.

Extracted form History of Pelham, Mass. From 1738 to 1898, including the early History of Prescott by C. O. Parmenter, Amherst, Mass: Press of Carpenter & Morehouse, 1898.

John Savage was one of the most remarkable men among the settlers of Pelham. He was not one of the original settlers of the town but came to Pelham with his wife in 1745 or 1747 and was one of the towns' ablest and most trusted citizens for about 20 years, serving the town in almost every position of trust and responsibility while he dwelt within its borders. He was chosen to represent the town before the presbytery in 1747; committee to provide schoolmasters in 1781; moderator at town meetings, and selectman in 1752; on committee to legalize acts of town meetings before the General Court and also one of the selectmen in 1753; committee to represent the town at the superior court in Springfield in 1757, chosen agent to represent the town before the court of General Sessions in 1762; was on a committee to represent the town and make answer to a petition that had been presented to the General Court in 1764. The above are a few important positions of service to which he was called as shown by the record. Hardly a year but John Savage was in active service in some capacity from the time when his name first appears until he removed from the town in 1767 to Salem, Washington county, N. Y.

A lineal descendant has kindly furnished the following interesting sketch of the life of John Savage. "The ancestors of Captain John Savage were French, being Huguenots they were driven from France by the revocation of the edict of Nantes in 1685. They settled in or near Londonderry in the north of Ireland. The father of John Savage married a Scotch lady, Miss Eleanor Hamilton; he died leaving three sons, who came to America with their mother and step-father in 1717, and settled at Rutland, Mass. John Savage was 10 years old at that time and followed the seas as a sailor during the early part of his life. He gradually accumulated property and became sole owner of the vessel which he commanded. In a storm the vessel was wrecked off Cape Breton, his men and Cargo being all lost, and he barely escaped with his life. After this experience he abandoned the sea, and in 1733 married a daughter of his step-father also a Miss Hamilton, and settled down upon a farm in Pelham, Mass.

In 1758 he was selected as captain of one of the Massachusetts companies in the old French War, and served under General Bradstreet in his expedition against Fort Fontenac, and under General Abercrombie in his disastrous assault upon Fort Ticonderoga. Captain Savage was lame at the time of the letter engagement, but notwithstanding this he placed himself at the head of his men and led them into the fight.

After residing 22 years in Pelham, Captain Savage moved to Salem, Washington county, N. Y., in 1767, where he died Jan. 27, 1792, aged eighty-five years, and now rests in Evergreen Cemetery, at Salem.

The following is the quaint and curious inscription upon his tombstone. (Repeat of statement above.)

JOHN SAVAGE, Jr. 1735 -
Elizabeth Long

Extracted from The Cobequid Townships, Truro, Onslow, Londonderry, 1760-1780 by Carol Campbell, A Publication of the Colchester Historical Museum.

Economic opportunity for suppliers of provisions for the military increased in the late 1770s with the growth of the British garrison at Halifax. This military presence provided a viable alternative for rural merchants. They could either remain in Nova Scotia and adjust to the new economic climate, or leave everything behind and start anew. It was a choice dependent upon both individual circumstances and political conviction. The effect of personal finances upon that decision is suggested by the contrasting experiences of two Truro merchants, John Savage and Matthew Archibald.
John Savage had been a community leader from the rime that he arrived in the hamlet of Down. A surveyor by profession, his public offices included being an elder of the Presbyterian Church, Moderator of Town Meetings, Justice of the Peace and Lieutenant of the Militia. As well, he was a trader, an owner of a small mill and a successful farmer of his 500 acres of original grant. His standing among fellow townsmen can be judged from the fact that in 1772 he was assigned the critical and delicate task of surveying and dividing the backlands of Truro Township. His fee for the service was to be 12,000 acres of the land directly behind the household lots of Derry and Down, a financial bonanza that he had to forego.

His downfall was financial rather than political. He began his slide into bankruptcy in Boston, neglecting to pay for 38 milk cans worth £3.5. He then ran up further bills, to a total surrt of £36.1.9, with Benjamin Jessome of Halifax. He also signed a promissory note with Joshua Mauger's subordinate, John Butler, for £12.9.9.'27 As a result of a 1774 debt proceeding in the Supreme Court at Halifax, Elisha Dewoife was sent to fetch Savage and bring him to jail, but "The defendant (was) not to be found." His debts included £54.9.4, owed to Samuel, Matthew and John Archibald and on December 10, 1777, the Provost Marshal ordered his land sold, together with some stock and his small sawmill.
Having lost all his Nova Scotian assets. Savage decided to take advantage of the political situation.
By pretext of service in the States of America with force and arms did set upon, capture and carried away to his own use, the Schooner Three Friends, tackle, apparel, furniture, boat stores and cargo of 180 bushels of salt at about £450. At the same time took white oak staves, instruments and furniture at £30 and about the same time and place captured the Schooner Ebenezer, with her tackle, apparel and furniture at £65.
He and his friends then sailed to the United States, beyond the reach of the Supreme Court and Debtors' Prison. Despite the fact that he left behind two children, the defection of the "absent and absconding debtor" was forgotten and Thomas Miller states that he died shortly after receiving the survey contract in 1772.
In contrast, Matthew Archibald, when trading with New England declined, concentrated on enlarging his tannery, located near his house. Although tanning was a dirty, smelly trade that defiled its surroundings, Matthew's wife, Janet Fisher, did not complain.131 In the eighteenth century the intrusive presence of noise, smell and general disorder



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