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View Tree for Philip SittonPhilip Sitton (b. November 7, 1770, d. June 19, 1843)

Philip Sitton (son of Philip Sitton (Was a Twin) and Hannah) was born November 7, 1770 in North Carolina, and died June 19, 1843 in Mills River (Henderson Co) NC. He married Winifred Bradley on May 17, 1786 in Randolph County, NC, daughter of Lawrence Bradley` and Winifred Wisdom.

 Includes NotesNotes for Philip Sitton:
Descendants of Philip Sitton

Generation No. 1


1. PHILIP6 SITTON (PHILIP5, JOHN4, BENJAMIN3, JOHN2 SUTTON, JR., JOHN1) was born
November 07, 1770 in North Carolina, and died June 19, 1843 in Mills River,
Henderson County, NC. He married WINIFRED BRADLEY May 17, 1786 in Randolph
County, NC, daughter of LAWRENCE BRADLEY and WINIFRED WISDOM. She was born July
20, 1766 in North Carolina, and died September 28, 1841 in Mills River,
Henderson County, NC.

Notes for PHILIP SITTON:
Philip Sitton was born November 7, 1770, the son of Philip and Hannah
Sitton. He was probably born in North Carolina, as records indicate his father
Philip was in Orange County, N. C. about this time.
The only known children
of Philip and Hannah were John, born October 30, 1763 and Philip, born November
7, 1770.. Since John and Philip were both grown and married when their father
died, there were evidently other children, since Joseph was administrator of his
orphans.
At the time Joseph Sitton was given custody of the Philip Sitton children,
he was living in the central part of North Carolina, and the first seven
children of Joseph and his wife, Diannah Beck, were born in North Carolina.
their eighth child was born in the Pendleton district of South Carolina in 1790.
Five more children were born to them in South Carolina.
In the 1790's, Joseph and Diannah Sitton took their 13, children, sons and
daughters-in-law, and a few grandchildren, and moved over into Tennessee, where
they lived for some 17 years, then on to Missouri territory. Joseph and Diannah
Sitton are buried in Bryants Creek Cemetery near Troy, Missouri.
John and Philip, sons of Philip and Hannah Sitton, did not leave South
Carolina with their uncle Joseph, but remained for the present at Georges Creek,
S. C. John Sitton, born October 30, 1763, married Sarah Rigby in March of 1780,
raised nine children, and is known at the progenitor of the South Carolina
Sittons. A few years before his death in 1843, John received a land grant, and
settled in what is now White County, Ga., where he and his wife are buried in
the church cemetery of the old Mt. Pleasant United Methodist Church, six miles
north of Cleveland, Ga. Many of John's descendants are still in the Greenville,
Pickens and Easley areas of South Carolina.
Philip Sitton, subject of these notes, was married May 17, 1786, at the
age of 15 1/2, to Winifred Bradley, daughter of Lawrence and Winifred Wisdom
Bradley. It is believed that Philip and Winifred came down to South Carolina
with his Uncle Joseph and other members of the Sitton Family. Philip and
Winifred lived several years in the Georges Creek area of South Carolina. this
is just a few miles southwest of Greenville, near Easley. There is no way to
know just when Philip and Winifred moved from Georges Creek to the Mills River
area of Buncombe County, N.C., now Henderson County. Philip and his family are
listed in the Buncombe County 1800 U. S census. He is listed as Philip Sutton.
Philip Sitton and his family were among the early settlers of the
beautiful Mills River Valley, and he left his mark on the area. He came to Mills
River before the age of 30, and established one of the first iron forges in
Western North Carolina. In 1788, the General Assembly of N. C., passed an act
granting three thousand acres of land for "every set of iron works, as a bounty
from the state to any person or persons who will build and carry on the same."
This bounty may have enticed Philip to come to North Carolina. In 1804, the
court of Buncombe County ordered that 3000 acres of land be granted to Philip
Sitton for the iron works which he was operating, on what is now Forge Mountain
in Henderson County, N. C.
The establishing of this iron works was one of the most important
contributions made to the development of this section. Iron mined from this
place, some on the side of the mountain where the Sittons lived, and other
obtained on the Boyleston side, then hauled over the roof-like ascent and
downward pitch of Forge Mountain, was manufactured under the direction of Philip
Sitton, much of it by his own hands. From the loops and bars of iron made at the
Sitton forge, early settlers were furnished with tools of every description to
aid them in taming the wilderness and adding refinements to their primitive mode
of living. I have copies of the land grants given to Philip Sitton by the state
of North Carolina for the use of Iron-works, one deed is for 2186 acres, the
other for 1000.
Philip and Winifred Sitton's family continued to grow until 1809, when
their eleventh child was born, a total of eight sons and three daughters.
When Philip Sitton settled at Mills River, the nearest church was the
French Broad Baptist Church, located just off N. C. Highway 191, and some 10
miles from where Sitton lived. The Sitton family attended the French Broad
Church for many years, making the long trip by horseback or buggy. As more
families settled in the Mills River Valley, it was natural that they thought of
establishing a church nearer home. Philip Sitton and his family were
instrumental in the establishment of the Mills River Baptist Church in 1833. On
June 27, 1835, the church was officially organized, with Philip, his wife and
several members of his family making up about half of the charter membership.
Philip Sitton was very active in the Mills River Church, being mentioned
many times as a delegate to the conventions and was a church leader. The
following statement is recorded on page 51 of the first book of minutes of the
Mills River Baptist Church. "We are called on to record the death of Brother
Philip Sitton Sr., who departed this life 19th of June 1843." Philip was buried
upon a hill near his home place, overlooking the site of his old Iron forge. He
was laid to rest beside his wife who preceded him in death. The old grave yard
is now known as the "Sitton-Gillespie Cemetery."



.

More About PHILIP SITTON:
Burial: Sitton-Gillespie Cemetery, Mills River

More About WINIFRED BRADLEY:
Burial: Sitton-Gillespie Cemetery, Mills River, Henderson County, NC

More About PHILIP SITTON and WINIFRED BRADLEY:
Marriage: May 17, 1786, Randolph County, NC

Children of PHILIP SITTON and WINIFRED BRADLEY are:
2.i. AMBROSE7 SITTON, b. April 19, 1787, North Carolina; d. Unknown, Rabun
County, Ga..
3.ii. ELIZABETH SITTON, b. December 31, 1788; d. April 11, 1858, Henderson
County NC.
4.iii. PHILIP SITTON, JR., b. December 23, 1790, South Carolina; d.
Unknown, Walker County, Al..
iv. JOHN SITTON, b. January 11, 1793, South Carolina; d. Aft. 1860.
Notes for JOHN SITTON:
John Sitton, born January 11, 1793, in South Carolina, was the third son
of Philip and Winifred Bradley Sitton. He came to Mills River with his
family when he was about 5 years old. I call John the "Elusive One",
because I have spent so much time and come up with so little. John
evidently married very young, as he is listed in the Buncombe County
census of 1820 with a wife, 4 sons and 2 daughters. In the 1830 census he
is listed with his wife, 6 sons and 3 daughters, so I know he had at least
9 children. He joined the Beulah Baptist Church of Henderson County, on
August 19, 1820, wife not listed, and was given a letter of dismission on
July 19, 1823. At one time he was a trustee of the Mills River Baptist
Church. In the 1850 Henderson County census, he is listed in the household
of Hodge and Sarah Huggins, of the Big Willow section, perhaps a
son-in-law and daughter. At one time John Sitton Sr., was excluded from
the French Broad Baptist Church for "Putting his wife away", but was later
re admitted to the Mills River Church, where he held membership until
1860. Nothing definite is known of John's children, but it is my belief
that George Sitton, born in 1812, and Philip Sitton, born 1814 and married
Cassandra Allion, are his sons. There must have been a John Jr., as John
is listed as John Sr. in the church records and land deeds. Philip Sitton,
born 1814, and his wife Cassandra Allison, left a large number of
descendants in the are


5.v. LAWRENCE SITTON, b. September 11, 1794, South Carolina; d. March 21,
1873, Mills River, Henderson County, NC.
6.vi. SILAS SITTON, b. October 14, 1796, South Carolina.
7.vii. ASA SITTON, b. April 07, 1799, Henderson County NC; d. Aft. 1860.
8.viii. JOSEPH SITTON, b. January 22, 1801, Henderson County NC; d. Aft.
1870, Gentry Co., Mo..
9.ix. JAMES SITTON, b. November 09, 1801, Henderson County NC; d. February
03, 1886, Henderson County NC.
x. WINIFRED SITTON, b. September 21, 1804, Henderson County NC; d. April
29, 1853, Henderson County NC; m. JOSHUA SOUTHER, March 04, 1851,
Henderson County NC; b. November 19, 1798; d. July 22, 1872, Henderson
County NC.
More About WINIFRED SITTON:
Burial: Patty's Chapel Methodist Cemetery, Henderson County, NC


More About JOSHUA SOUTHER:
Burial: Patty's Chapel Methodist Cemetery, Henderson County, NC


More About JOSHUA SOUTHER and WINIFRED SITTON:
Marriage: March 04, 1851, Henderson County NC


10.xi. SARAH SITTON, b. June 04, 1809, Henderson County NC; d. July 13,
1878, Macon County, NC.



Descendants of Philip Sitton

Generation No. 1

1. PHILIP6 SITTON (PHILIP5, JOHN4, BENJAMIN3, JOHN2 SUTTON, JR., JOHN1) was born
November 07, 1770 in North Carolina, and died June 19, 1843 in Mills River,
Henderson County, NC. He married WINIFRED BRADLEY May 17, 1786 in Randolph
County, NC, daughter of LAWRENCE BRADLEY and WINIFRED WISDOM. She was born July
20, 1766 in North Carolina, and died September 28, 1841 in Mills River,
Henderson County, NC.

Notes for PHILIP SITTON:
Philip Sitton was born November 7, 1770, the son of Philip and Hannah
Sitton. He was probably born in North Carolina, as records indicate his father
Philip was in Orange County, N. C. about this time.
Philip's ancestry begins with his 3rd. great grandfather, John Sutton Sr.,
who in 1638, left Attleburg (Attleborough), England, and sailed for America on
the little ship, "Diligent of Ipswitch", along with his wife Juliana Little and
four children. John and his family arrived at the port of Hingham, Mass., just a
few miles north of Plymouth Rock, and just a few years after the Pilgrims landed
there. The townspeople of Hingham gave John and his family 4 acres of land. The
history of Hingham states that John Sutton, his wife Juliana and their four
children came from England. Later, John deeded the land to his only son, John
Jr., and took his wife and daughters to Rehoboth Island, where he lived the
remainder of his life, which ended June 1, 1672. John, his wife and a daughter
are buried on Rehoboth Island.
John Sutton Jr. was born about 1620 in Attleborough, England, son of John
and Juliana Little Sutton. He came to America with his family in 1638. John Jr.
was married January 1, 1661, to Elizabeth House, daughter of Samuel and Alice
Lloyd House of Scituate, Mass. This may have been a second marriage for John
Jr., as he was over 40 years old at the time, but no record has been found of
another marriage, and Elizabeth is the mother of all his recorded children. John
Jr., sold his land left to him by his father in Hingham, and relocated in
Scituate, where he died about 1692. He left a will dated November 12, 1691, in
which he names his wife Elizabeth, and their eight children.
Benjamin Sitton, son of John and Elizabeth House Sutton, Jr., was born
March 22, 1674. Benjamin evidently left Scituate as a young man, perhaps already
married to Lydia, whose maiden name and marriage records have not been located.
The birth of their first son, Christopher, born April 23, 1696, is recorded in
Woodstock, Conn. Their other 5 children were probably born in Promfret, Conn.,
the area he next appears. Benjamin Sitton is mentioned many times in the
"History of Enfield, Conn.", and early deeds list him as a husbandman and a
yeoman, both of which would mean that he was a farmer. In the history of
Enfield, Benjamin's name was spelled, Sitton, Sitten, Sittan, Sittern, Citron,
Siton, and Citton, but no record of it spelled Sutton. Benjamin left Pompret
sometime between 1714 and 1729, when his wife Lydia died in Somers, Conn.
The marriage intentions of Benjamin Sitton and Rachel Bigbie, a widow of
Ashford, Conn. were published December 19, 1730, and on March 7, 1731, the wife
of Benjamin Sitton was admitted to the congregational Church in Somers, from the
church in Ashford. Benjamin Sitton died in Somers, December 18, 1742, and
Rachel, his widow, died May 7, 1760.
John Sitton, son of Benjamin and Lydia, was born about 1700. John left
Connecticut at a young age and settled at Queen Ann Parish, Prince George
County, Maryland. On June 9, 1729, John, a blacksmith and farmer, married
Elizabeth Pindell, daughter of Philip and Elizabeth Holland Pindell. In 1730,
their first child, a daughter was born and named Elizabeth, named for her mother
and grandmother. A record has been found that her grandfather, Philip Pindell,
gave her a little slave girl named Sarah, age 5. In April 1732, John and
Elizabeth were the parents of a son, Benjamin, no doubt named for his
grandfather and Benjamin Jr., who died in John's home in September of 1731. On
August 15, 1733, twin sons were born to John and Elizabeth, Philip, named for
his grandfather, Philip Pindell, and John, named for his father. Other children
of John and Elizabeth were Christopher, born ca 1738, William, born 1742, and
Joseph, born October 15, 1745. It is believed that the later three, along with
John, one of the twins, were all veterans of the Revolutionary War. No place or
dates of John or Elizabeth's deaths have been found.
Philip Sitton, born August 15, 1733, one of the twins born to John and
Elizabeth, has been hard to trace. his wifes name was Hannah, maiden name and
date of marriage unknown. Several records of Philip Sitton are found in the
Orange County, N. C. records of the 1760's. Philip died in 1788, leaving land in
both Randolph County, N. C., and a grant in Chatham County, made to his orphans
under the administration of Joseph Sitton, his brother. The only known children
of Philip and Hannah were John, born October 30, 1763 and Philip, born November
7, 1770.. Since John and Philip were both grown and married when their father
died, there were evidently other children, since Joseph was administrator of his
orphans.
At the time Joseph Sitton was given custody of the Philip Sitton children,
he was living in the central part of North Carolina, and the first seven
children of Joseph and his wife, Diannah Beck, were born in North Carolina.
their eighth child was born in the Pendleton district of South Carolina in 1790.
Five more children were born to them in South Carolina.
In the 1790's, Joseph and Diannah Sitton took their 13, children, sons and
daughters-in-law, and a few grandchildren, and moved over into Tennessee, where
they lived for some 17 years, then on to Missouri territory. Joseph and Diannah
Sitton are buried in Bryants Creek Cemetery near Troy, Missouri.
John and Philip, sons of Philip and Hannah Sitton, did not leave South
Carolina with their uncle Joseph, but remained for the present at Georges Creek,
S. C. John Sitton, born October 30, 1763, married Sarah Rigby in March of 1780,
raised nine children, and is known at the progenitor of the South Carolina
Sittons. A few years before his death in 1843, John received a land grant, and
settled in what is now White County, Ga., where he and his wife are buried in
the church cemetery of the old Mt. Pleasant United Methodist Church, six miles
north of Cleveland, Ga. Many of John's descendants are still in the Greenville,
Pickens and Easley areas of South Carolina.
Philip Sitton, subject of these notes, was married May 17, 1786, at the
age of 15 1/2, to Winifred Bradley, daughter of Lawrence and Winifred Wisdom
Bradley. It is believed that Philip and Winifred came down to South Carolina
with his Uncle Joseph and other members of the Sitton Family. Philip and
Winifred lived several years in the Georges Creek area of South Carolina. this
is just a few miles southwest of Greenville, near Easley. There is no way to
know just when Philip and Winifred moved from Georges Creek to the Mills River
area of Buncombe County, N.C., now Henderson County. Philip and his family are
listed in the Buncombe County 1800 U. S census. He is listed as Philip Sutton.
Philip Sitton and his family were among the early settlers of the
beautiful Mills River Valley, and he left his mark on the area. He came to Mills
River before the age of 30, and established one of the first iron forges in
Western North Carolina. In 1788, the General Assembly of N. C., passed an act
granting three thousand acres of land for "every set of iron works, as a bounty
from the state to any person or persons who will build and carry on the same."
This bounty may have enticed Philip to come to North Carolina. In 1804, the
court of Buncombe County ordered that 3000 acres of land be granted to Philip
Sitton for the iron works which he was operating, on what is now Forge Mountain
in Henderson County, N. C.
The establishing of this iron works was one of the most important
contributions made to the development of this section. Iron mined from this
place, some on the side of the mountain where the Sittons lived, and other
obtained on the Boyleston side, then hauled over the roof-like ascent and
downward pitch of Forge Mountain, was manufactured under the direction of Philip
Sitton, much of it by his own hands. From the loops and bars of iron made at the
Sitton forge, early settlers were furnished with tools of every description to
aid them in taming the wilderness and adding refinements to their primitive mode
of living. I have copies of the land grants given to Philip Sitton by the state
of North Carolina for the use of Iron-works, one deed is for 2186 acres, the
other for 1000.
Philip and Winifred Sitton's family continued to grow until 1809, when
their eleventh child was born, a total of eight sons and three daughters.
When Philip Sitton settled at Mills River, the nearest church was the
French Broad Baptist Church, located just off N. C. Highway 191, and some 10
miles from where Sitton lived. The Sitton family attended the French Broad
Church for many years, making the long trip by horseback or buggy. As more
families settled in the Mills River Valley, it was natural that they thought of
establishing a church nearer home. Philip Sitton and his family were
instrumental in the establishment of the Mills River Baptist Church in 1833. On
June 27, 1835, the church was officially organized, with Philip, his wife and
several members of his family making up about half of the charter membership.
Philip Sitton was very active in the Mills River Church, being mentioned
many times as a delegate to the conventions and was a church leader. The
following statement is recorded on page 51 of the first book of minutes of the
Mills River Baptist Church. "We are called on to record the death of Brother
Philip Sitton Sr., who departed this life 19th of June 1843." Philip was buried
upon a hill near his home place, overlooking the site of his old Iron forge. He
was laid to rest beside his wife who preceded him in death. The old grave yard
is now known as the "Sitton-Gillespie Cemetery."



.

More About PHILIP SITTON:
Burial: Sitton-Gillespie Cemetery, Mills River

More About WINIFRED BRADLEY:
Burial: Sitton-Gillespie Cemetery, Mills River, Henderson County, NC

More About PHILIP SITTON and WINIFRED BRADLEY:
Marriage: May 17, 1786, Randolph County, NC

Children of PHILIP SITTON and WINIFRED BRADLEY are:
2.i. AMBROSE7 SITTON, b. April 19, 1787, North Carolina; d. Unknown, Rabun
County, Ga..
3.ii. ELIZABETH SITTON, b. December 31, 1788; d. April 11, 1858, Henderson
County NC.
4.iii. PHILIP SITTON, JR., b. December 23, 1790, South Carolina; d.
Unknown, Walker County, Al..
iv. JOHN SITTON, b. January 11, 1793, South Carolina; d. Aft. 1860.
5.v. LAWRENCE SITTON, b. September 11, 1794, South Carolina; d. March 21,
1873, Mills River, Henderson County, NC.
6.vi. SILAS SITTON, b. October 14, 1796, South Carolina.
7.vii. ASA SITTON, b. April 07, 1799, Henderson County NC; d. Aft. 1860.
8.viii. JOSEPH SITTON, b. January 22, 1801, Henderson County NC; d. Aft.
1870, Gentry Co., Mo..
9.ix. JAMES SITTON, b. November 09, 1801, Henderson County NC; d. February
03, 1886, Henderson County NC.
x. WINIFRED SITTON, b. September 21, 1804, Henderson County NC; d. April
29, 1853, Henderson County NC; m. JOSHUA SOUTHER, March 04, 1851,
Henderson County NC; b. November 19, 1798; d. July 22, 1872, Henderson
County NC.
More About WINIFRED SITTON:
Burial: Patty's Chapel Methodist Cemetery, Henderson County, NC
10.xi. SARAH SITTON, b. June 04, 1809, Henderson County NC; d. July 13,
1878, Macon County, NC.






More About Philip Sitton and Winifred Bradley:
Marriage: May 17, 1786, Randolph County, NC.

Children of Philip Sitton and Winifred Bradley are:
  1. +John W. Sitton, Sr. (AKA Sutton), b. January 11, 1793, South Carolina, d. Aft. 1855, California or Oregon.
  2. Philip Sitton, Jr., b. December 23, 1790.
  3. Elizabeth Sitton, b. December 31, 1788.
  4. Anbrose Sitton, b. April 19, 1787.
  5. Lawrence Sitton, b. 1794.
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