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View Tree for Zachary T. nee Zachary T. nee "Zack" ADDINGTON (b. October 22, 1847, d. 1908)

Zachary T. nee "Zack" ADDINGTON (son of Jarrett ADDINGTON and Lucinda Amanda SPIVEY)1 was born October 22, 1847 in Gilmer Co., Georgia1, and died 1908 in Gainesville, Texas1. He married (1) Mollie N. STEVENS. He married (2) Elizabeth BEAVERS.

 Includes NotesNotes for Zachary T. nee "Zack" ADDINGTON:
THE FIRST 100 YEARS IN COOKE COUNTY TEXAS
Page 72
On February 26, 1878, the commissioners court advertised for bids for a new courthouse to be erected in the center of the square in Gainsville. The contract was let for $31,499. The Masonic fraternity laid the cornerstone on June 24 of that year.
The courthouse was financed with cattle money, according to Mrs. J. A. Walker, a 1948 resident of Gainsville. She said her father, J. B. F. Maxwell, furnished the money for the construction of the building. Mr. Maxwell was a cattleman of the county, and at that time owned three large ranches in the Indian Territory.
Mrs. Walker stated that her father was approached for a loan by Ike Cloud, and that he readily agreed to put up the money for the courthouse.
The building was made of yellow-face stone. Mrs. Walker stated that the county imported contractors from Arkansas and Kansas to work on the courthouse.
Not only did her father lend the money for the courthouse, but also he often sponsored the building of fine houses in Gainesville. Mrs. Walker recalled that her father lent ZACK ADDINGTON the money to build his fine home on Lindsay Street.
Page 81
The early records of the Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association showed there were forty to fifty members living in Gainesville or who gave the town as their home address. Their ranches were spread over a wide area of the cow country. Among these cowmen were the Witherspoon brothers, P. S. and J. G., operating in Hardeman County, Texas and at Red Rock, Indian Territory; the ADDINGTONS, ZACK, ANDY, and COLUMBUS, in the Comanche country, the town of Addington (Indian Territory) Oklahoma being named for them.
Page 118
In 1891, Gainesville College was opened, on September 7, in the former ZACK ADDINGTON home in the 1000 block of South Denton Street. It was a coeducational institution. (The building several years later was razed, and materials from it used to erect the opera house at Rusk and Main streets.)
Page 123 - The Gay Nineties
There were few telephones for making "dates" in those days. Instead of a telephone operator, the "go-between" usually was a young colored boy, who delivered a note to the young lady and awaited a reply.
Among the girls taking active part in the society whirl, as revealed by the society columns of the "Hesperian" in the 90's, were Nora Hudson, Imogene, andPearl Elliott, Mildred Green, Maude Fletcher, Ida Cleaves, Dixie Potter, Eva and Rannie Cleaves, Lulu Robinson, Annie and Cora Davis, Helen Kennerly, Annie Irvine and others. The young men included Jack Criss, Moran Scott, D. B. McCall, George Yates, GEORGE ADDINGTON, Frank Gilpin, Charles Dickinson, Jim Sullivant, Lonny Mathis, Yancey Lewis, R. S. Rose, John Simpson, A. B. McCans, Val Peers, Edlar Blanton and others.
Page 127
In 1895, Mr. Gallia started selling tickets to the opening production in a new opera house at $25 each and was successful in raising more than $4,000. With this he purchased the old ZACK ADDINGTON mansion of cattle boom days. The structure was dismantled and moved to a location at Rusk and Main streets, where a handsome three-story opera house was erected. It was auspiciously opened on January 30, 1896. The lot was bought from C. F. Gilpin for $2,000, and the building cost $20,000 to erect.

Bibliography
Smith, A. Morton, "The First 100 Years in Cooke County, 1955
The Naylor Co, San Antonio, Texas

GHOST TOWNS OF OKLAHOMA - by John W. Morris
Page 14A
Addington
County: Jefferson
Location: (a) Sec. 6. T 4 S. R 7 W
(b) 6 miles north, 2 miles east of Waurika
Map: Page 219
Post Office: January 8, 1896-
Newspapers: Addington Free Lance; Addington Advertiser; Addington Journal;
Addington Herald
Railroad: Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad
Addington had its start in the 1890's after the Rock Island extended its tracks southward from Minco to the Red River. Located in an area of fertile soil and good grassland, the town developed as an agricultural trade center from which corn, cotton, and cattle were shipped. In 1908, Addington had three cotton gins and two livestock sales pens. The corn crop was so great that much had to be stored in long ricks on the ground.
The town was incorporated in 1901. The "Addington Herald" in December stated: "It is six months old and has more substantial buildings and more permanent business men than any other town of its age and size in either territory." Advertisements in the 1901 and early 1902 editions listed doctors, lawyers, paper hangers, real estate dealers, and building contractors in addition to the usual retail business notices. There was a brickyard manufacturing pressed brick. The Bank of Addington had been organized by a young woman who served as chahier. The paper stated she was the only woman bank officer in Oklahoma Territory. (See Lenora.)
Population in 1902 was estimated at about 350 people. Addington continued to increase in size until about 1915, when the population was about 1,000 persons. At that time, there were fourteen stores, two cotton gins, a cottonseed oil mill, three livestock dealers, the bank, the brick plant, a hotel, a telephone exchange, and four real estate offices. The town added a "new addition making room for 1,500 families." Schools and churches had been developed, and the future looked bright - then came World War I.
During much of the 1920's, Addington stood still. Most of the excitement centered around bank robberies. Twice within a short period of time the bank was held up and the robbers escaped. Two peace officers had been killed from ambush while on duty. The county sheriff then appointed "Two Gun" Bill Fowler as deputy sheriff and assigned him to Addington. Fowler was on duty when the third attempt was made on October 26, 1928. One robber went inside the bank to get the money, and the second stood guard at the entrance. They left the motor of their car running. The robber in the bank found it necessary to fire a shot, which was heard by Fowler. The lookout stood behind a support column and fired at Fowler as he approached. After exchanging shots, the outside man exposed his arm to shoot again. Fowler's shot broke the man's arm, causing him to drop his gun. The inside man came out with the money, and both ran for their car. "Two Gun" was carrying only one gun at the time, and it was empty. He ran to his car, got his rifle, and shot at the fleeing car. The shot cut the ignition wires and stopped the flight. Both robbers jumped and ran. Fowler immediately shot one, the fellow he had previously wonded. Leaving him under guard, the deputy went after the second and killed him. When the shooting was over, the banker stated: "I am tired of being shot at and robbed. This bank is going out of business." He immediately closed the bank and paid off all accounts in full.
The bank closing, the Depression of the 1930's, World War II, and other factors caused many people to move from the town and area. A barber shop, a pecan shelling plant, a filling station, and sometimes a cafe-grocery store are now in operation. Empty, ramshackle building, including the old bank structure, lione U. S. Highway 81. In the northeastern part of town stand the blackened walls of the former school building, which was being used for the storage of hay when it burned. Fewer than one hundred people now live in Addington.

Bibliography
Morris, John W.. "Ghost Towns of Oklahoma," University of Oklahoma Press, 1978
Zachary T. Addington, born 1847 in Gilmer Co., Georgia, ranched with his brothers in the Indian Territory, until the reservation was opened to settlement, following which he operated livery stables at Addington and Ringling, Oklahoma. His first marriage was to Mollie Stevens, whose children were: Una, married Ed Eskew; Sudie, married Joe Harrison; Aubrey; Mabel; Roscoe. After the death of Mollie in 1886, Zack Addington married Elizabeth Beavers, and their children were: Josephine, married Dick Smith; Vera, married C. D. McDonald; Albert, Z. T., and little Elizabeth. Of this family, only Mrs. McDonald is living Col---- today. All left children and grandchildren. In 1908, Zack Addington warned the surveying crew, camped on Beaver Creek, of impending floods, and when the disaster struck, brought men and horses to the rescue. This exposure caused his death from pneumonia in the spring of 1908. This event and many other fond recollections were spoken of for at least fifty years after his death.
Zack was a prosperous cattleman in Indian Territory, OK. He also operated livery stables in Addington, Oklahoma and Ringling, Oklahoma. Zack Addington was on Mud Creek and ran the Three I brand. He later went into partnership with the Washingtons. He build a beautiful home in Gainesville, Texas - buried in one of Gainesville's cemeteries.
Wife #1 Mollie STEVENS; wife #2 Elizabeth BEAVERS - Total 10 children.

ADDINGTON OF MUCH INTEREST
TOWN WAS ONCE IMPORTANT CENTER OF CATTLE INDUSTRY IN TERRITORY
The name of Addington was indelibly identified with the cattle industry of Indian territory for three-quarters of century and although none by the name are engaged in the business now they left behind them many marks by which they are remembered. Among the landmarks in Oklahoma that bear the Addington name are the town of Addington in Jefferson county, named in honor of Zack Addington and Addington Bend, a magnificent area of farm land on the north bank of the Red River in what is now Love County.
JARRETT ADDINGTON ARRIVED FIRST
The first of the clan to invade the west and father of a numerous progeny was Jarrett Addington, who left his home in Cassville, Georgia and emigrated to Texas in 1857, landing in Cooke County early in that year. When Addington arrived in north Texas, Gainesville was nothing but a stage stand operated by the grandfather of Claude Weaver, now private secretary to Governor William H. Murray.
Under the terms of an agreement between Indian citizens of the territory and the Federal Government entered into at Fort Smith in 1866, one of the vital restrictions placed upon the white man from living in the Indian country was removed. By terms of this agreement, an Indian citizen was allowed to select one white farmer to assist him in working his land. This farmer automatically became a citizen of the tribe, but was surrounded by certain restrictions until his status as a tribesman was established. Bob Love, one of the most influential Indian citizens who ever lived in the territory took a fancy to Addington and induced him to come across the Red River and take up a lease for farming and cattle raising.
ADDINGTON DEVELOPED SECTION
Addington accepted and secured a lease on 600 acres of land located south and a little east of the present town of Marietta. The lease was taken under Eugenie Love's name, and Addington proceeded to develop one of the richest sections i the territory. It was not long after he began to operate and produce such heavy crops as to attract the attention of other farmers that the location became known as Addington Bend, and is so designated to this day. Addington's lease continued for a period of 10 years. After its expiration as age was creeping upon him and he did not care to renew it, he went back to Grayson County, Texas and died near Whitesboro a few years later. Of the large family of sons and daughters left by Addington only two now survive. They are Andrew Jackson Addington, well past the four-score mark, and Mrs. Buck Gardenhire (Nancy), both residents of Ardmore.
LAND NOW OWNED BY ABSENTEES
The present aspect of Addington Bend does ot present the scene of prosperity it possessed when worked under the direction of Jarrett Addington and his crew of workers. In those days, diversified farming was practiced, although the cattle business was the principle occupation of most Indian Territory land owners, and the well-filled cribs and huge stacks of forage attested to the industry of those in charge of affairs. The land in Addington Bend is mostly owned by absentee landlords and operated by tenants who according to their own statements, recently gleaned by a survey of the section do not remain very long in the bend where the theme song is cotton and more cotton with a little regard for feedstuff for work stock and none for dairy cows and hogs.
LAND IS ENCUMBERED
Addington Bend today presents pleasure of what absentee landlordism does to a country. The location is ideal for farming on an extensive scale that is extensive, collectively, for no man has any business trying to operate all the land in Addington Bend. Most of the land, like other lands in Southern Oklahoma is encumbered only an equity remaining with the original owner. This condition could be considerably altered, it is pointed out if the loan companies would consent to divide up these big farms into small tracts and sell to approved tenant farmers at a reasonable price per acre and at a low rate of interest on a long term contract. In this way, the glory of Addington would be restored, the county farm agent of Love County declared.
There are a few resident land owners in Addington Bend, and they are in much better circumstances than the itinerant tenant whose term of residence is less than three years; it was found by diligent inquiry.
BEND COULD BE A PARADISE
Someone with initiative and cash could convert Addington Bend into an Oklahoma paradise, but something will have to be done to alter the attitude of land owners who see the land once a year, perhaps , and inspire them to provide better living quarters for their tenants, encourage the tenants to make enough to live on at home, insist that they have a cow or two, a few hogs, and a flock of poultry, and then see that they are workers instead of fishermen and the Bend will once more blossom as it did in the past.

PHOTO OF ZACK ADDINGTON EARLY-DAY GAINESVILLE PALACE
The photo is a reproduction of a photograph of the home of Zach Addington, one of the rich cattlemen who resided in Gainesville in the early days. It was located in the vicinity of the present Newsome Dougherty Memorial High School and at the time was one of the few buildings of any consequence in the south part of town. When the great cattle panic of the early days swept away the fortunes of Texas cattlemen, Mr. Addington and many other local citizens lost their homes as well as practically all else. For some time it was used as a college, but later the building was torn down and from it's materials, the present Gainesville Opera House located on Rusk street was built. Preston Addington, brother to Zach, also had a big home one block south of the residence pictured.
Home was on South Lindsay Street next door to the J. P. Addington home, also another place
Brick - 1000 block South Denton
Andy Addington - corner Denton and Hird?sp - lived here when married

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THE FIRST 100 YEARS IN COOKE COUNTY TEXAS
Page 72
On February 26, 1878, the commissioners court advertised for bids for a new courthouse to be erected in the center of the square in Gainsville. The contract was let for $31,499. The Masonic fraternity laid the cornerstone on June 24 of that year.
The courthouse was financed with cattle money, according to Mrs. J. A. Walker, a 1948 resident of Gainsville. She said her father, J. B. F. Maxwell, furnished the money for the construction of the building. Mr. Maxwell was a cattleman of the county, and at that time owned three large ranches in the Indian Territory.
Mrs. Walker stated that her father was approached for a loan by Ike Cloud, and that he readily agreed to put up the money for the courthouse.
The building was made of yellow-face stone. Mrs. Walker stated that the county imported contractors from Arkansas and Kansas to work on the courthouse.
Not only did her father lend the money for the courthouse, but also he often sponsored the building of fine houses in Gainesville. Mrs. Walker recalled that her father lent ZACK ADDINGTON the money to build his fine home on Lindsay Street.
Page 81
The early records of the Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association showed there were forty to fifty members living in Gainesville or who gave the town as their home address. Their ranches were spread over a wide area of the cow country. Among these cowmen were the Witherspoon brothers, P. S. and J. G., operating in Hardeman County, Texas and at Red Rock, Indian Territory; the ADDINGTONS, ZACK, ANDY, and COLUMBUS, in the Comanche country, the town of Addington (Indian Territory) Oklahoma being named for them.
Page 118
In 1891, Gainesville College was opened, on September 7, in the former ZACK ADDINGTON home in the 1000 block of South Denton Street. It was a coeducational institution. (The building several years later was razed, and materials from it used to erect the opera house at Rusk and Main streets.)
Page 123 - The Gay Nineties
There were few telephones for making "dates" in those days. Instead of a telephone operator, the "go-between" usually was a young colored boy, who delivered a note to the young lady and awaited a reply.
Among the girls taking active part in the society whirl, as revealed by the society columns of the "Hesperian" in the 90's, were Nora Hudson, Imogene, andPearl Elliott, Mildred Green, Maude Fletcher, Ida Cleaves, Dixie Potter, Eva and Rannie Cleaves, Lulu Robinson, Annie and Cora Davis, Helen Kennerly, Annie Irvine and others. The young men included Jack Criss, Moran Scott, D. B. McCall, George Yates, GEORGE ADDINGTON, Frank Gilpin, Charles Dickinson, Jim Sullivant, Lonny Mathis, Yancey Lewis, R. S. Rose, John Simpson, A. B. McCans, Val Peers, Edlar Blanton and others.
Page 127
In 1895, Mr. Gallia started selling tickets to the opening production in a new opera house at $25 each and was successful in raising more than $4,000. With this he purchased the old ZACK ADDINGTON mansion of cattle boom days. The structure was dismantled and moved to a location at Rusk and Main streets, where a handsome three-story opera house was erected. It was auspiciously opened on January 30, 1896. The lot was bought from C. F. Gilpin for $2,000, and the building cost $20,000 to erect.

Bibliography
Smith, A. Morton, "The First 100 Years in Cooke County, 1955
The Naylor Co, San Antonio, Texas

GHOST TOWNS OF OKLAHOMA - by John W. Morris
Page 14A
Addington
County: Jefferson
Location: (a) Sec. 6. T 4 S. R 7 W
(b) 6 miles north, 2 miles east of Waurika
Map: Page 219
Post Office: January 8, 1896-
Newspapers: Addington Free Lance; Addington Advertiser; Addington Journal;
Addington Herald
Railroad: Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad
Addington had its start in the 1890's after the Rock Island extended its tracks southward from Minco to the Red River. Located in an area of fertile soil and good grassland, the town developed as an agricultural trade center from which corn, cotton, and cattle were shipped. In 1908, Addington had three cotton gins and two livestock sales pens. The corn crop was so great that much had to be stored in long ricks on the ground.
The town was incorporated in 1901. The "Addington Herald" in December stated: "It is six months old and has more substantial buildings and more permanent business men than any other town of its age and size in either territory." Advertisements in the 1901 and early 1902 editions listed doctors, lawyers, paper hangers, real estate dealers, and building contractors in addition to the usual retail business notices. There was a brickyard manufacturing pressed brick. The Bank of Addington had been organized by a young woman who served as cashier. The paper stated she was the only woman bank officer in Oklahoma Territory. (See Lenora.)
Population in 1902 was estimated at about 350 people. Addington continued to increase in size until about 1915, when the population was about 1,000 persons. At that time, there were fourteen stores, two cotton gins, a cottonseed oil mill, three livestock dealers, the bank, the brick plant, a hotel, a telephone exchange, and four real estate offices. The town added a "new addition making room for 1,500 families." Schools and churches had been developed, and the future looked bright - then came World War I.
During much of the 1920's, Addington stood still. Most of the excitement centered around bank robberies. Twice within a short period of time the bank was held up and the robbers escaped. Two peace officers had been killed from ambush while on duty. The county sheriff then appointed "Two Gun" Bill Fowler as deputy sheriff and assigned him to Addington. Fowler was on duty when the third attempt was made on October 26, 1928. One robber went inside the bank to get the money, and the second stood guard at the entrance. They left the motor of their car running. The robber in the bank found it necessary to fire a shot, which was heard by Fowler. The lookout stood behind a support column and fired at Fowler as he approached. After exchanging shots, the outside man exposed his arm to shoot again. Fowler's shot broke the man's arm, causing him to drop his gun. The inside man came out with the money, and both ran for their car. "Two Gun" was carrying only one gun at the time, and it was empty. He ran to his car, got his rifle, and shot at the fleeing car. The shot cut the ignition wires and stopped the flight. Both robbers jumped and ran. Fowler immediately shot one, the fellow he had previously wonded. Leaving him under guard, the deputy went after the second and killed him. When the shooting was over, the banker stated: "I am tired of being shot at and robbed. This bank is going out of business." He immediately closed the bank and paid off all accounts in full.
The bank closing, the Depression of the 1930's, World War II, and other factors caused many people to move from the town and area. A barber shop, a pecan shelling plant, a filling station, and sometimes a cafe-grocery store are now in operation. Empty, ramshackle building, including the old bank structure, lione U. S. Highway 81. In the northeastern part of town stand the blackened walls of the former school building, which was being used for the storage of hay when it burned. Fewer than one hundred people now live in Addington.

Bibliography
Morris, John W.. "Ghost Towns of Oklahoma," University of Oklahoma Press, 1978
Zachary T. Addington, born 1847 in Gilmer Co., Georgia, ranched with his brothers in the Indian Territory, until the reservation was opened to settlement, following which he operated livery stables at Addington and Ringling, Oklahoma. His first marriage was to Mollie Stevens, whose children were: Una, married Ed Eskew; Sudie, married Joe Harrison; Aubrey; Mabel; Roscoe. After the death of Mollie in 1886, Zack Addington married Elizabeth Beavers, and their children were: Josephine, married Dick Smith; Vera, married C. D. McDonald; Albert, Z. T., and little Elizabeth. Of this family, only Mrs. McDonald is living Col---- today. All left children and grandchildren. In 1908, Zack Addington warned the surveying crew, camped on Beaver Creek, of impending floods, and when the disaster struck, brought men and horses to the rescue. This exposure caused his death from pneumonia in the spring of 1908. This event and many other fond recollections were spoken of for at least fifty years after his death.
Zack was a prosperous cattleman in Indian Territory, OK. He also operated livery stables in Addington, Oklahoma and Ringling, Oklahoma. Zack Addington was on Mud Creek and ran the Three I brand. He later went into partnership with the Washingtons. He build a beautiful home in Gainesville, Texas - buried in one of Gainesville's cemeteries.
Wife #1 Mollie STEVENS; wife #2 Elizabeth BEAVERS - Total 10 children.

ADDINGTON OF MUCH INTEREST
TOWN WAS ONCE IMPORTANT CENTER OF CATTLE INDUSTRY IN TERRITORY
The name of Addington was indelibly identified with the cattle industry of Indian territory for three-quarters of century and although none by the name are engaged in the business now they left behind them many marks by which they are remembered. Among the landmarks in Oklahoma that bear the Addington name are the town of Addington in Jefferson county, named in honor of Zack Addington and Addington Bend, a magnificent area of farm land on the north bank of the Red River in what is now Love County.
JARRETT ADDINGTON ARRIVED FIRST
The first of the clan to invade the west and father of a numerous progeny was Jarrett Addington, who left his home in Cassville, Georgia and emigrated to Texas in 1857, landing in Cooke County early in that year. When Addington arrived in north Texas, Gainesville was nothing but a stage stand operated by the grandfather of Claude Weaver, now private secretary to Governor William H. Murray.
Under the terms of an agreement between Indian citizens of the territory and the Federal Government entered into at Fort Smith in 1866, one of the vital restrictions placed upon the white man from living in the Indian country was removed. By terms of this agreement, an Indian citizen was allowed to select one white farmer to assist him in working his land. This farmer automatically became a citizen of the tribe, but was surrounded by certain restrictions until his status as a tribesman was established. Bob Love, one of the most influential Indian citizens who ever lived in the territory took a fancy to Addington and induced him to come across the Red River and take up a lease for farming and cattle raising.
ADDINGTON DEVELOPED SECTION
Addington accepted and secured a lease on 600 acres of land located south and a little east of the present town of Marietta. The lease was taken under Eugenie Love's name, and Addington proceeded to develop one of the richest sections i the territory. It was not long after he began to operate and produce such heavy crops as to attract the attention of other farmers that the location became known as Addington Bend, and is so designated to this day. Addington's lease continued for a period of 10 years. After its expiration as age was creeping upon him and he did not care to renew it, he went back to Grayson County, Texas and died near Whitesboro a few years later. Of the large family of sons and daughters left by Addington only two now survive. They are Andrew Jackson Addington, well past the four-score mark, and Mrs. Buck Gardenhire (Nancy), both residents of Ardmore.
LAND NOW OWNED BY ABSENTEES
The present aspect of Addington Bend does ot present the scene of prosperity it possessed when worked under the direction of Jarrett Addington and his crew of workers. In those days, diversified farming was practiced, although the cattle business was the principle occupation of most Indian Territory land owners, and the well-filled cribs and huge stacks of forage attested to the industry of those in charge of affairs. The land in Addington Bend is mostly owned by absentee landlords and operated by tenants who according to their own statements, recently gleaned by a survey of the section do not remain very long in the bend where the theme song is cotton and more cotton with a little regard for feedstuff for work stock and none for dairy cows and hogs.
LAND IS ENCUMBERED
Addington Bend today presents pleasure of what absentee landlordism does to a country. The location is ideal for farming on an extensive scale that is extensive, collectively, for no man has any business trying to operate all the land in Addington Bend. Most of the land, like other lands in Southern Oklahoma is encumbered only an equity remaining with the original owner. This condition could be considerably altered, it is pointed out if the loan companies would consent to divide up these big farms into small tracts and sell to approved tenant farmers at a reasonable price per acre and at a low rate of interest on a long term contract. In this way, the glory of Addington would be restored, the county farm agent of Love County declared.
There are a few resident land owners in Addington Bend, and they are in much better circumstances than the itinerant tenant whose term of residence is less than three years; it was found by diligent inquiry.
BEND COULD BE A PARADISE
Someone with initiative and cash could convert Addington Bend into an Oklahoma paradise, but something will have to be done to alter the attitude of land owners who see the land once a year, perhaps , and inspire them to provide better living quarters for their tenants, encourage the tenants to make enough to live on at home, insist that they have a cow or two, a few hogs, and a flock of poultry, and then see that they are workers instead of fishermen and the Bend will once more blossom as it did in the past.

PHOTO OF ZACK ADDINGTON EARLY-DAY GAINESVILLE PALACE
The photo is a reproduction of a photograph of the home of Zach Addington, one of the rich cattlemen who resided in Gainesville in the early days. It was located in the vicinity of the present Newsome Dougherty Memorial High School and at the time was one of the few buildings of any consequence in the south part of town. When the great cattle panic of the early days swept away the fortunes of Texas cattlemen, Mr. Addington and many other local citizens lost their homes as well as practically all else. For some time it was used as a college, but later the building was torn down and from it's materials, the present Gainesville Opera House located on Rusk street was built. Preston Addington, brother to Zach, also had a big home one block south of the residence pictured.
Home was on South Lindsay St

Children of Zachary T. nee "Zack" ADDINGTON and Mollie N. STEVENS are:
  1. Una ADDINGTON.
  2. Sudie ADDINGTON.
  3. Aubrey ADDINGTON.
  4. Roscoe ADDINGTON.
  5. Mable Addington.
  6. Vera Addington.
  7. Elizabeth Addington.
  8. Zaccary T. Addington, b. October 22, 18471, d., Buried in Gainsville TX, family plot (photo of grave)1.

Children of Zachary T. nee "Zack" ADDINGTON and Elizabeth BEAVERS are:
  1. Josephine ADDINGTON.
  2. Albert ADDINGTON.
  3. Zacary T. ADDINGTON, Jr..
  4. Elizabeth Addington.
  5. Vera Addington.
Created with Family Tree Maker


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