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Eley & Greenberry Lee Research Center

Updated June 15, 2001

Sandra Johnson Taylor
Rt. 1 Box 135
Red Level, Al 36474
United States
334-469-5259
Fax: 334-4699069
Thomasat@alaweb.com

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Greenberry Lee and Eley Lee were brothers, born in 1800 and 1799, Eley in Williamsburg, S.C. (possibly in part which became Marion or Liberty counties) They were connected with Putnam Co. Ga. (formed 1807) and Fairfield Co., S.C. and as young adults migrated to Covington County Alabama via Montgomery in the 1820s and 1830s. Family legend is that they were part of a huge wagon train of Lee relatives who went on to Mississippi, including brothers Zach and Johnny. In Montgomery, Eley Lee married Sarah Piles (Sara Pyles) and Greenberry married Martha Jane Taylor, daughter of Martha and (Dr.?) Richard Taylor. Lees of Covington Co. had names common to the Georgetown, S.C. area -- like George Washington Lee -- and they intemarried with S.C. families like Dozier, McCord, Howell, etc. Families of Middleton and Turberville moved with them. The Lee Family Fiddlers were famous. The Lee brothers obviously had Maryland antecedents. (Hillery-Pyles-Young, etc.)and seem to be relatives of John Lee of Marion Co. S.C., the son or grandson of John Lee and Margaret Howard of Fairfield Co. S.C. Greenberry Lee told his grandchildren they were related to the families of "Young and Jackson." Greenberry and Eley are believed by some descendants to be sons of Dr. William Lee, grandsons of Elizabeth Few Lee Andrew Bush and first husband, Col. Greenberry Lee. Their grandmother -- if Elizabeth Few Lee Andrew Bush was their grandmother -- died in Montgomery in 1829, home of her son minister/doctor Moses Andrew. After her death, Greenberry and Eley moved south to the new Covington County, founded by her nephew-in-law William Devereux. Greenberry Lee named a son Andrew Jackson Lee, with descendants assuming it was for the president. If, however, the Lees were indeed related to the Jackson family and if Moses Andrew was their uncle, it could have been Andrew (no s) Jackson Lee. Greenberry and Eley apprently lived next door in Montgomery to a relative -- Jane Lee Atkinson. The Lee brothers founded Westover in Covington Co., named for either the Westover District next to the James River in Virginia, or for the Byrd family who owned Westover Plantion and intermarried with the family of Light Horse Harry. (The Byrds --and Turberville of Virginia Lee families - are found in North Carolina in Halifax Co. with the Lees and in Williamsburg, S.C. with the Lees.) Jane Lee Atkinson may have moved to Monroe County, where settled the Marshall nieces and nephews of Elizabeth Few Lee Andrew Bush. Greenberry Lee told his children to cherish a picture of Light Horse Harry he kept in his Bible, "because he was my daddy's cousin." There was also Irish blood in Greenberry and Eley, possibly of the huge Irish settlement in Williamsburg. A picture of Greenberry's son, George Washington Lee, bears striking resemblance to Light Horse Harry's son, Robert E. Lee. It is believed that brothers Johnny and Zach went on to Mississippi, where future generations of Lees included the name of Greenberry (near Hattiesburg) The believed-great-grandparents of Greenberry & Eley, John Lee and Margaret Howard, were married in Maryland. She was daughter of Gideon Howard and descendant of Col.Nicholas Greenberry, co-regent of Maryland in the 1690s. Males in his line died out after the second generation, but stories of his wealth and influence influenced hundreds of descendants to name sons after him. Col. Greenberry is buried in old St. Anne's cemetery in the middle of historic Annapolis.

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