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Descendants of Isaac Hickman




Generation No. 1


       1. Isaac1 Hickman (Source: Betty Jeanne Ward Poulin, Choctaw Heritage, (Copyright 1981), 310, Isaac Hickman was an early settler of Welchneck tract, close to Society Hill, eighteen to twenty miles up DeeDee from Jerries Creek, Pennsylvania. He served in the militia during the expedition to Fort Prince George, in 1759. Isaac Hickman moved south and married.) was born Abt. 1690. He married Elizabeth Hickman.

Notes for Isaac Hickman:
THE HICKMAN FAMILY

THE HICKMAN FAMILY EMIGRATED TO AMERICA FROM THE BRITISH ISLES AND BY
THE EARLY 1700'S ISAAC AND ELIZABETH HICKMAN HAD MIGRATED FROM VIRGINIA
TO SOUTH CAROLINA. THEIR SON WILLIAM WAS BORN THERE IN 1735. WILLIAM'S
SON PARIS AND FAMILY WERE LIVING IN SOUTH CAROLINA IN 1820, ALABAMA IN
1830, AND HAD MOVED TO NESHOBA COUNTY MISSISSIPPI BY 1835 SETTLING NEAR
THE CHOCTAW RESERVATION WEST OF THE PEARL RIVER. PARIS' CHILDREN WILLIAM
AUSTIN, SAMUEL FRASER, LADSON, ROBERT, TABITHA AND FAMILIES SETTLED IN
THE CHOCTAW NATION.

IN 1840 SAMUEL FRASER, MARRIED LUCY FILLE MON TUBBEE, A MEMBER OF THE
BOGUE CHITO CLAN, AND SAM HELPED SETTLE HER FAMILY IN THE CHOCTAW NATION.
SAM AND LUCY MADE TWO ABORTED ATTEMPTS TO MOVE, IN 1849 AND 1853, EACH
TIME RETURNING TO MISSISSIPPI DUE TO EPIDEMICS RAGING IN THE NATION. THE
THIRD ATTEMPT IN 1860 WAS SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED AND THEY SETTLED NEAR
SCULLY VILLE, WHERE SAM BRED AND RAISED PAINT PONIES. SAM'S FAMILY'S LAND
ALLOTMENTS WERE IN THE HEAVENER AREA.

WILLIAM AUSTIN'S SON, WILLIAM PARIS WAS A CONFEDERATE VETERAN, AND BEING DISSATISFIED WITH THE RECONSTRUCTION GOVERNMENT IN MISSISSIPPI, TRAVELED WEST TO FT. SMITH BY RAIL AND STEAMSHIP IN 1869. 1870 HIS PARENTS, WITH A GROUP OF WHITE AND INDIAN FAMILIES--HICKMAN, MORRIS, MOORE AND DONALD--CAME OVERLAND IN THIRTY OX-DRAWN COVERED WAGONS TO INDIAN TERRITORY FROM PHILADELPHIA, MISSISSIPPI VIA MEMPHIS AND FT. SMITH. THE MOVE TOOK SIX MONTHS. EVERY NIGHT AFTER SUPPER THEY WOULD CLEAR OFF THE
CAMPSITE AND HAVE A BIG DANCE.

WILLIAM PARIS RETURNED TO MISSISSIPPI IN 1871 AND MARRIED ARELIA LEE, DAUGHTER OF EVAN LUDBROOK AND NANCY MCINTYRE LEE, STAYING THERE UNTIL 1877 WHEN THEY MOVED TO INDIAN TERRITORY, SETTLING AT POCOLA, NEAR MANY FAMILIES FORMERLY THEIR NEIGHBORS IN MISSISSIPPI.

EVAN LUDBROOK LEE WAS A DESCENDENT OF RICHARD AND ISABELA SMYTH PACE, WHO ARRIVED IN JAMESTOWN ABOUT 1610. IN 1620, THEY PATENTED A
PLANTATION--PACES PAINES--ON THE SOUTHSIDE OF THE JAMES RIVER. IT WAS THERE THAT THE YOUNG INDIAN CHANCO, A CHRISTIAN CONVERT LIVING IN THEIR HOME, WAS INSTRUCTED TO SLAY PACE DURING THE NIGHT BEFORE THE INDIAN MASSACRE OF MARCH 22, 1621/22. INSTEAD, CHANCO AWAKENED HIM AND REVEALED THE PLOT TO ANNIHILATE THE COLONISTS. AFTER SECURING HIS PLANTATION, PACE ROWED THE FOUR MILES ACROSS THE RIVER TO JAMESTOWN, WARNING GOVERNOR WYATT OF THE IMPENDING ATTACK. THE ALARM WAS ISSUED, THE FORT SECURED,
AND RUNNERS SENT TO WARN NEARBY SETTLEMENTS, REMOVING THE ELEMENT OF SURPRISE AND MANY LIVES WERE SAVED.

HOWEVER, THE WARNING CAME TOO LATE FOR MANY OF THE OUTLYING PLANTATIONS AND MANY DEATHS OCCURRED. AMONG THOSE SLAIN WAS SAMUEL MAYCOCK OF MAYCOCK'S HUNDRED LOCATED 40 MILES UPRIVER FROM JAMESTOWN. MAYCOCK WAS A CAMBRIDGE SCHOLAR, AN ORDAINED MINISTER, AND, IN 1619 AS A MEMBER OF THE COUNCIL OF STATE, PARTICIPATED IN THE FIRST GENERAL ASSEMBLY CONVENED IN
VIRGINA.

GEORGE PACE, SON OF RICHARD, MARRIED SAMUEL MAYCOCK'S DAUGHTER SARAH AND ESTABLISHED THE PACE FAMILY IN AMERICA. AMONG THE DESCENDANTS OF THIS FAMILY IN PITTSBURG COUNTY ARE THE HICKMAN, LEE, ALLFORD, AND MILLER FAMILIES; ALSO, CLYDE STRICKLAND, PEGGY GIVENS AND PALMER PACE.

GEORGE SOLD PACES PAINES IN 1635. THE PLANTATION IS PRESENTLY OWNED BY THE ELAY FAMILY, WHO RESIDE IN THE MANSION MOUNT PLEASANT BUILT IN THE 1700'S. IN A PEACEFUL SECLUDED AREA, THE SERENE VIEW OF THE RIVER REVEAL NONE OF THE STRUGGLE TO ESTABLISH THE COLONY SUFFERED BY THE COLONISTS. NEARBY, IN A SMALL BURIAL GROUND OVERSHADOWED BY AN LARGE WEEPING WILLOW, LIE THE REMAINS OF MANY OF THOSE WHOSE LIVES WERE SPENT ON PACES PAINES.

MAYCOCK'S HUNDRED WAS HELD IN TRUST FOR SARAH UNTIL SHE REACHED HER MAJORITY AND WAS INHERITED HER SON RICHARD IN 1655. THERE IS NO PROOF HE SOLD MAYCOCK'S HUNDRED BUT ROGER DRAYTON OWNED IT IN 1696. THE SITE LIES 8 MILES EAST OF THE BENJAMIN HARRISON BRIDGE AND IS NOW A GAME AND WILDLIFE REFUGE.

NANCY MCINTYRE LEE, ARELIA'S MOTHER, WAS BORN IN HIGHLANDS OF SCOTLAND IN 1824 AND CAME TO AMERICA WHEN SHE WAS SIX YEARS OLD. SHE GREW UP IN NESHOBA COUNTY WHERE SHE LIVED WITH AN ELDERLY UNCLE. NANCY SPOKE GAELIC, CHOCTAW, AND ENGLISH. SPEAKING A MIXTURE OF ALL THREE, FAMILY MEMBERS SAY SHE NEVER FINISHED A SENTENCE.

ACCORDING TO SOME FAMILY MEMBERS, SARAH P. MCADORY HICKMAN, MOTHER OF WILLIAM PARIS, WAS THE GRANDDAUGHTER OF A CHOCTAW MEDICINE MAN, AND TREATED PEOPLE WITH HERBS AND NATURAL REMEDIES. BEN, WILLIAM PARIS'S SON SAID FOLKS CALLED HIS GRANDMOTHER AN "INDIAN MEDICINE WOMAN", AND PEOPLE
CAME FROM MILES AROUND IN SEARCH OF HER HEALING POWERS AND HOME REMEDIES.

THERE WAS A POST OFFICE NAMED HICKMAN IN NORTHEASTERN HASKELL COUNTY NEAR THE ARKANSAS RIVER FROM 3 OCTOBER 1894 TO 6 JULY 1898, NAMED FOR W.P. HICKMAN, A PROMINENT CHOCTAW.
WILLIAM PARIS FARMED NEAR POCOLA AND BLAINE BEFORE MOVING HIS FAMILY TO THE NEWMAN--NOW STIGLER--AREA IN 1891 WHERE HE AND HIS SONS FARMED. CROPS RAISED THERE DURING THAT TIME INCLUDED BLACK EYED PEAS, COTTON, CORN AND SORGHUM MOLASSES. DEER AND WILD TURKEY WERE PLENTIFUL AND THERE WERE WILD HOGS IN THE AREA. W. P. HAD "HOG DOGS" THAT WOULD CATCH THE HOGS AS THEY RAN THROUGH THE UNDERBRUSH, AND THE BOYS AT HOME WOULD HAVE THE WATER
BOILING READY FOR THE KILL.

WILLIAM PARIS DIED IN STIGLER 28 NOVEMBER 1908 AND ARELIA DIED 25 MARCH 1922. THEY ARE BURIED IN THE STIGLER CEMETERY.

BORN TO WILLIAM PARIS AND ARELIA WERE TEN CHILDREN: SARAH JANE, EVAN AUSTIN, JAMES MARTIN, JOHN BENJAMIN, IDA, CALLIE, EUGENE, ROBERT, MARY PAULINE, AND BARBARA.

SEVERAL OF WILLIAM PARIS' CHILDREN LIVED IN PITTSBURG COUNTY FOLLOWING STATEHOOD: CALLIE WAS MARRIED TO JAMES GILSTRAP AND THEY LIVED AT SCIPIO; HICKMAN, A POST OFFICE IN WESTERN PITTSBURG COUNTY WAS NAMED FOR EUGENE, POSTMASTER IN 1914; ROBERT WAS LIVING AT SCIPIO WITH HIS BROTHER EVAN AUSTIN WHEN HE DIED 28 FEB 1915; BARBARA "BARB" LIVED IN SCIPIO IN 1917-18; SEE RELATED ARTICLES ABOUT EVAN AUSTIN "BUD", JAMES MARTIN "MART", AND JOHN BENJAMIN "BEN".

SOURCES:
RECORDS OF THE VIRGINIA COMPANY VOL III EDITED BY SUSAN MYRA KINGSBURY
HISTORY OF THE PACE
HISTORY OF THE PACE FAMILY COMPLIED BY FREDA REID TURNER
THE HUGUENOT MILLERS BY MARGARET MILLER WHITE
CHOCTAW HERITAGE BY BETTY PULLIN
U. S. CENSUS PERSONAL KNOWLEDGE
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Isaac and Elizabeth Hickman were in South Carolina in 1735
when their son William was born. (DAR records)

In 1746, Isaac was granted a plat of 450 acres in Craven County, South
Carolina. (South Carolina Archives--Colonial Plats.).

       
Children of Isaac Hickman and Elizabeth Hickman are:

  2 i.   Elizabeth2 Hickman.

  3 ii.   Joshua Hickman.

  4 iii.   Samel Hickman.

  5 iv.   Matilda Hickman.

  6 v.   Sarah Hickman, born February 7, 1743.

  7 vi.   Mary Hickman, born December 7, 1740.

+ 8 vii.   William Hickman, born March 14, 1732; died April 17, 1816.


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