Some Facts Concerning the Murphy Family

 

William Murphy was born in the north of Ireland.  He came to America and lived in Virginia.  His son, John, a Baptist minister, was born in Virginia, June 12, 1752, and was married to Rachel Cooke, a native of Virginia, February 8, 1774.  Rachel Cooke was born in Virginia May 17, 1753.  They moved to Knox County, East Tennessee, and later emigrated to the Green River country, Kentucky, where he died August 14, 1818 and Rachel Cooke Murphy died in Kentucky in 1832.  Their children were: William, Isaac, Joseph, John, Hosea, Seth, Cooke, Margaret, Rachel and Hannah.

 

John Murphy, our great, great grandfather, was in the Revolution.  Their son, William, our great grandfather, was born in Tennessee February 16, 1776.  He went to Kentucky with his parents and there married Nancy Ferguson.  She was born on the James River in Virginia.  Her father was Scotch and her mother English.  Both her parents died and she went to Kentucky with her sister and brother-in-law, going on horseback.  They both died in Illinois, - - William Murphy, March 4, 1846, and Nancy Ferguson Murphy, August 26, 1862.  Their children were Margaret, born September 10, 1801; Elizabeth, born August 1, 1804; John Ecles, born October 16,1806; Nancy, born December 21, 1808; and Rachel, born June 3, 1811.

 

William Murphy................................. Ireland

John Murphy.................................... Virginia

Rachel Cooke................................. Virginia

William Murphy......................... Tennessee

Nancy Ferguson............................. Virginia

 

Here Mrs. Fenton told something of their lives during the time of the Revolutionary war and the struggle for an existence in East Tennessee, panthers and Indians being their constant terrors.

 

The daughters of John Murphy and Rachel Cooke were: Hannah, who married Thomas Ferguson, a brother of Nancy Ferguson, who married their son, William.  They lived and died at Bowling Green, Kentucky.  Rachel, who married Major Peter Butler in Kentucky.  They moved to Warren County, Illinois, and it was on their farm the fort was built where the families went for protection in the Indian troubles.  He was in the Mexican War and the Black Hawk War as well as the War of 1812.  They went to Oregon and were pioneers of two states and died at Monmouth, Oregon, where their son, Ira F.N. Butler, still lives, ninety-four years old.  Margaret, who married Elijah Davidson in Kentucky and they too went to Warren County and then to Oregon and were buried with their kindred near Monmouth, Oregon.

 

Aunt Rachel Butler used to tell of an estate that was coming to them through the Cookes but there was a missing heir between them.  All they had to do was for the children of John Murphy and Rachel Cooke to go to Bowling Green and prove that they were their sons and daughters and they would have received the Virginia estate, but they would not go for fear of the missing heir being found and for fear they were defrauding someone.

 

The two brothers of Rachel Cooke, Hosea and Jesse, were both killed by Indians in 1792 in the Inniss Settlement near Frankfort, Kentucky.

 

Cooke

 

This family is of great antiquity.  Norman DeCooke and Robert DeCooke were witnesses to a grant of land by DePercy to the Church of St. Peter and Hyldea at Whilby, Yorkshire.  Robert DeCooke and his son held the hereditary office of Master of the Cooke of the Monastary.  This was about the middle of the Twelfth Century.  In Beeston, Yorkshire, the family was called Gales de Cooke but the Gales was later dropped.  Robert Cooke and his wife, Katherine, were living in Lavenham, Sussex, about 1400.  Their son, Sir Thomas Cooke, was Lord Mayor of London in 1462.  His son, Sir John Cooke, was one of the private secretaries.  His son, John Cooke, married Alice Saunders, and their son was Sir Anthony Cooke, “the English scholar”, who was tutor to Edward VI and was knighted at his royal pupil’s coronation.  His wife was Annie Fitzwilliams and one of their daughters married Nicholas Bacon and they were the grandparents of Lord Bacon.  Many of the family were in Parliament and they were all from the Yorkshire family.

 

Francis Cooke, Pilgrim, was from Yorkshire and was a member of Robinson’s Church.  When the Pilgrims went to Holland in 1608 to escape the persecutions the separatists were subjected to in England, the family went with them but only he and his son, John, who was ten years old, embarked in the Mayflower for America.  His wife, Hester, and the other children were left at Leydon to come later.  Francis Cooke was the seventeenth signer of the Cape Cod Compact and built one of the first seven houses built at Plymouth.

 

“Captain Miles Standish and Francis Cooke being at work in the woods, coming home, left their tools and were taken away by the savages, gave us occasion to keep more strict watch and to make our muskets and equipment ready, which by the moisture and rain were out of temper.” Bradford’s Plymouth Plantation.

 

Francis Cooke died at Plymouth in April, 1663, and his son, John, was the last to die of the Mayflower passengers, dying at Dartmouth after 1694.  They were prominent men in the colony.  We are descended from Francis Cooke through the Virginia descendents.  Captain Thomas Cooke came to New England in 1635, settling in Boston.  Others were John, Edward, William, Arthur, George, Richard and Garrett coming in the later part of the century.

 

Mordecai Cooke came from England in 1650 bringing his wife with him and soon after settling in Virginia - - Gloucester County.  She was slain by the Indians and scalped.  He called the place “Mordecai’s Mount”.  His second wife was Joan Constable.  He owned one thousand two hundred acres of land and his son also Mordecai, also was a large land owner.

 

Giles Cooke was a member of the expedition under Governor Spotswood across the mountains and descended the forks of the Shenandoah and was a Knight of the Golden Horseshoe.  John Cooke was a very dignified individual who always rode in a fine carriage.  He was in command of a regiment during the Revolution.  He was a brother of our great-great, great grandfather William Cooke.  These people were all relatives of our.  William Cooke, who was the father of our great, great, grandmother, Rachel Cooke Murphy, “was dignified and imposing in appearance and greatly respected by his neighbors”.  He also was in the Revolution.  He had grants of land and lived after the manner of a Virginia gentleman.

 

Uncle Ira Butler, to whom Mrs. Fenton was indebted for much she wrote, remembers his grandmother Rachel Cooke Murphy as he was seventeen years old when he went to Illinois from Kentucky.  He said he just loved to sit and look at his grandmother, she was so pretty and good that he thought of her as the handsomest woman he ever saw.

 

Many of the Cookes are buried at Romford, 13 miles from London, where Thomas Cooke was Lord Mayor of London had a home and where his grandson, Sir Anthony Cooke, lived and was buried.  The place was called Gildon Hall and was pulled down in the last century.

 

The Cookes were educated in a time when it meant something to be educated.  Through all the changes in England they were Protestants.  Francis Cooke in his inventory includes “1 great Bible and 4 old books” that he had brought in the Mayflower.  Evidently books were his most valued possessions.

 

Uncle Ira Butler said there was much controversy among the neighbors over the wives of the two Cooke brothers who were slain by the Indians.  Some thought the one who bit the bullet in two deserved the most credit - - while others thought the one who shot the Indian with the bullet deserved the credit.  It seems they both did very brave things.  *He refers here to story “Bred in Old Kentucky”.

 

Copied from some family history sent to Maggie Sales, Galesburg, Ill. By Mrs. Katherine Fenton, Portland, Oregon.  Sent Oct. 19, 1906.

 

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*Hand written note on otherwise typed document.  The paper matches the paper that “Bred in Old Kentucky” was typed on and the handwritten note looks like it could be that of Eva Jameson Carter.

 

Continues on with more pages (very repetitive) - these appear to be typewritten notes already used above but I see some differences in spelling and different content.

 

 

Cooke

 

Robert DeCooke and his son held the hereditary office of Master of the Cooke of the Monastary.  This was about the middle of the Twelfth Century.

 

            In Buston, Yorkshire, the family was called Gales de Cooke which was dropped (Gales).  Robert Cooke and his wife, Katherine, were living in Lavenham, Sussex, about 1420.  Their son, Sir Thomas Cooke, was Lord Mayor of London in 1462.  His son, John Cooke, married Alice Saunders and their son was Sir Anthony Cooke “the English Scholar” who was tutor to Edward VI and was knighted at his royal pupil’s cornation.  His wife was Anne Fitz-Williams and one of their daughters married Nicholas Bacon, and these two were the grandparents of Lord Bacon.

 

            Many of the family were in Parliament and they were all from the Yorkshire family.

 

            Francis Cooke and son, John, who was ten years old, came in the Mayflower with the Pilgrims, leaving his wife, Hester, and the other children at Leydon to come later.

 

            We are descentents of Francis Cooke, - - William Cooke was the father of Rachel Cooke Murphy.

 

            William Murphy was born in the north of Ireland.  John Murphy, son of William Murphy, was born in Virginia, June 12, 1752, and was married to Rachel Cooke, February 8, 1774, who was born in Virginia May 17, 1753.

 

            They moved to Knox County, Tennessee, and later to the Green River country, Kentucky, where he died in 1818.  She died in Kentucky in 1831 or 1832.

 

            Their children were: William, Isaac, John, Hosea, Seth, (?) Cooke (?), Joseph, Margaret, Rachel and Hannah.  William married  Nancy Ferguson.  Isaac married Nancy Haley.  John married       .  Joseph married Julia B. Haley.  Margaret married Elijah Davidson, Rachel married Peter Butler.  Hannah married Thomas Ferguson.

 

            Francis Cooke was the father of William Cooke who was the father of Rachel Cooke Murphy.

 

            Henry Haley and Nancy Rivers were the parents of Berryman, Patrick H., Max, Henry, John G., Nancy, Julia, Patsy, Elizabeth.  Nancy married Isaac Murphy.  Julia married Joseph Murphy.   Patsy married       Shelton.  Elizabeth married Robert Jameson.  Aunt Sallie Jameson was the daughter of John Murphy.

 

            William Murphy was born in the north of Ireland.  He came to America and lived in Virginia.

 

            His son John, a Baptist minister, was born in Virginia, June 12, 1752, and was married to Rachel Cooke February 8, 1744.  Rachel Cooke was born in Virginia May 17, 1753.  They moved to Knox County, East Tennessee, and later to the Green River County, in Kentucky, where he died in 1818.  Rachel Cooke Murphy died in Kentucky in 1831 or 1832.

 

            Their children were: William, Isaac, John, Hosea, Seth, Cooke, Joseph, Margaret, Rachel, Hannah; William married Nancy Ferguson; Hannah married Thomas Ferguson; Isaac married Nancy Haley; Joseph married Julia B. Haley; Rachel married Major Peter Butler in Kentucky.

 

            Rachel and Peter moved to Warren County, Illinois, and it was on their farm the fort was built where the families went for protection in the Indian troubles.  He was in the Mexican War and the Black Hawk War and the War of 1812.

 

            Margaret married Elijah Davidson who, too, went to Warren County, Illinois, and later with Peter Butler and his wife to Monmouth, Ore.

 

Typed by Barb Tuinstra (3/23/2001)