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Descendants of SAMUEL COX

Generation No. 3


4. LOUISA V.3 MOXLEY (AGNES2 COX, SAMUEL1)48,49 was born August 09, 1801 in FRANKLIN CO. KY.50,51,52, and died December 24, 1882 in COX SPRING, GATESVILLE, TEXAS53,54. She married SOWYEL COX55,56,57 November 13, 1817 in SIMPSON,FRANKLIN CO,KENTUCKEY58,59, son of SAMUEL COX and NANCY WOOLFOLK. He was born February 21, 1798 in WOODFORD,PIKE,KENTUCKEY60,61,62, and died December 14, 1869 in GATESVILLE CORYELL CO. TX.63,64,65.

More About LOUISA V
. MOXLEY:
Burial: Unknown, GATESVILLE CITY CEMETERY65

Notes for SOWYEL COX:


SOWYEL COX DESCENDANTS
By Beth Hodges for THE CORYELL COUNTY KIN (2001 Summer; Vol XIX; #2)

In 1855 Coryell County, Texas was fledgling, young robust and full of promises. It had been created from Bell County and was organized on March 15, 1854. Early in 1854 county Officers had been elected and on May 27, 1854 Gatesville was chosen as the county seat. On July 13, 1854 the post office of Gatesville was created.

The county was experiencing troubles from marauding Indians. Fort Gates had been established in 1849 to protect the settlers in the area. However in March 1852, it was abandoned and its garrison moved westward to Fort Phantom Hill.

The Fort Gates settlement had become the nucleus for the settlement of Coryell County. Now after the formation of the County and the establishment of Gatesville as the County Seat settlers began to pour into the area.

One of these early pioneers in 1855 was Sowyel Cox. He was the oldest son of Samuel and Nancy Cox of Kentucky. He was born there on February 21, 1798.

On September 26, 1818, Sowyel's young wife, Louisa presented him with his first son, Joseph Matthew. Sowyel was then farming and ranching in Franklin County, Kentucky.

In 1818 Illinois was admitted to the Union as the 21st state. The Indian problems that had plagued the area had subsided. The area just north of the Ohio River was rich and fertile prairie and much more productive than the soils of Kentucky.

In October, 1825 Sowyel became one of the first settlers in the Mechanicsberg Township, Sangamon County, Illinois. On October 15, 1825 he filed claims on 400 acres in that township. On November 8, 1825 he added 80 acres in the Rochester Township and finally on January 28, 1833, 40 acres in the Lanesville Township was his final claim. He had moved here with his wife, Louisa, his father and mother, Samuel and Nancy Cox and his brother Samuel Jr. and his new bride.

Here in 1828 his first daughter, Mary Jane was born in 1830, another daughter, Nancy, joined his growing family. On November 12, 1832 the Village of Mechanicsburg was laid out and platted on the section next to Sowyel's farm. According to the History of Sangamon County, 1881, "the first brick house was built by Sowyel Cox" (in Mechanicsburg, Illinois).

In 1834 another daughter was born and named after her mother, Louisa. In 1836 finally another son was born and named Josiah Green after Sowyel's friend and the village blacksmith in Mechanicsburg.

It was not all peace and happiness at the time in Illinois. Sowyel, his brother Samuel Jr., and Samuel, his father were slave holders. They had brought their slaves with them from Kentucky. Illinois was free state but had a law permitting "bonded and indentured servants."

Mechanicsburg is located 15 to 18 miles east of Springfield, Illinois. In 1830 a young lawyer named Abraham Lincoln had come to Springfield and in 1836 had opened an office there. There were mixed feelings about slavery in Illinois at the time. What was a "bonded servant"? It was a way to circumvent the free state status of Illinois.

In 1833, Sowyel's father Samuel and brother, Samuel Jr. had moved to what was then Lewis County, Missouri. In 1837 Sowyel, his family his Negro man, Jim, moved to Clark County, Missouri. Clark County had been created from Lewis County. He settled down near Fairmount, Missouri.

Sowyel's sister, Martha, had on September 7, 1827 married James M. Lilliard, a Baptist Minister. The Reverend Lilliard was to become a pioneer preacher of Northeast Missouri. In his ministry of nearly fifty years he baptized over 3,000 persons, organized a great number of churches of Lewis, Clark, Scotland and other counties in Northwestern Missouri, aided in the ordination of 26 ministers and 32 ministers attribute their conversion to his preaching.

In 1839 the Mt. Moriah Baptist Church was formed in the southwest corner of Clark County, Missouri near the town of Fairmount. In 1843 the name was changed to the Bear Creek Baptist Church. Early in 1845 Sowyel, who lived about one-half mile north of the church offered these pioneer Baptists a deed for 5 acres of his land for the church and cemetery. It was accepted. As soon as the weather permitted in 1846 the task of making and burning the bricks and hauling of the site was done. The work was mostly accomplished by Sowyel, Daniel Wood, Mrs. Nancy Davis and the slaves of Sowyel and Mrs. Davis. In August the church was completed and although the old building was rebuilt in 1885, the congregation is still meeting at the site.

Soon after his arrival in Missouri in 1837, Sowyel was given another son, John William, by his wife Louisa. In 1841 Sowyel's last son Palonzo (nicknamed Pompy) was born and then in 1844 his last daughter, Sarah was born.


Meanwhile, his oldest son, Joseph was taking up the professions of miller and sawyer to add to the professions that a pioneer of the period must have. On November 17, 1839 Joseph married Phebe B. Turpin in Lewis Co. Missouri. She was the daughter of one of the earliest settlers of northeast Missouri, Daniel Turpin.

To this union eight children were born in Lewis County, Missouri. They were George Washington born November 15, 1840, Louisa born September 30, 1848, Thomas born July 9, 1844, Joseph born May 17, 1846, Elizabeth born March 30, 1848, Solomon born December 18, 1850, Mary born January 25, 1852 and Samuel born January 11, 1855.

Sowyel's three oldest daughters married sons of family friends and neighbors in Clark County, Missouri. Nancy married Daniel Wood in 1846, Mary Jane married Middleton Simpson in 1849. Louisa married Dony Tull in 1852.

Sowyel had settled on and improved a large homestead and farm in Clark County, Missouri near the small town of Fairmount. In the early part of 1855 soon after the birth of his grandson, Samuel (Joseph's youngest son) Sowyel sold his land in Clark County and made arrangements to buy land in Coryell County, Texas. Sowyel, at age 57, started on the trip to his new home in Texas after having previously settled in three states.

Sowyel, his wife Louisa and his four youngest children, Josiah, John, Palonzo and Sarah were to be joined by his oldest son, Joseph, his wife Phebe and their eight children on their trip to the new life in Coryell County, Texas. In addition some of Joseph's in-laws, the Turpins, and other friends joined the wagon train. Joseph had been operating a grist and saw mill in Lewis County, Missouri. He sold the mill but kept the equipment and loaded it in carts pulled by oxen to make the trip to the new land.

The wagon train left Missouri in the spring of 1855 and some six weeks later arrived in the new City of Gatesville, Texas. They got there in time for Joseph to pay his poll tax for 1855 according to the 1855 tax records of Coryell County, Texas.

Shortly after their arrival in Texas, Sowyel exercised his bond for the purchase of land. On November 26, 1856 R.G. Grant conveyed to Sowyel Cox, late of Clark County, Missouri, 155 acres on the Antonio Arocha Grant for the sum of $700.00 paid in gold. On the same day R.G. Grant conveyed to Joseph M. Cox a tract of 200 acres out of the Antonio Arocha Grant adjoining Sowyel's tract on the south for the sum of $900.00 cash. These two tracts were located about 4 miles southeast of Gatesville on the north bank of the Leon River. Being located on the Leon River was important to Joseph not only because of the necessity of water for existence but also for his profession.

R.G. Grant was operating a saw mill in Gatesville at the time. But there was a great need for a grist mill to provide the new settlers with cornmeal and flour. Joseph set about building his mill on the banks of the Leon River. Until the dam and water wheel was completed the mill was run by oxen-power. In 1861 Joseph purchased a one acre tract from the R.G. Grant Estate for $450.00 across from the mill on its south bank. This site was known as the Joe Cox Place until about 1875 when it passed into ownership of the Straw family. After this time it has been known as Straw's Mill.

In May, 1859 Sowyel purchased two tracts adjoining his original 155 acre tract on the north from the Estate of R.G. Grant. He paid $104.00 for a 260 acre tract and $60.93 for a 148 1/2 acre tract.

Shortly after Sowyel's arrival in Coryell County he joined about a dozen or so baptized believers and helped organize the First Baptist Church at Gatesville in September, 1856. His youngest daughter, Sarah, also was a charter member and one of its most staunch supporters. In September 1858 the First Baptist Church of Gatesville joined several other churches in Central Texas to form the Leon River Baptist Association and Sowyel was one of the messengers from Gatesville. On May 13, 1858 Sowyel's son John William married Elizabeth Keese. (She was the daughter of Thomas Jefferson some times referred to as Squire Keese. Thomas Jefferson Keese moved to Brown County in 1857 or 1858 where he was the Chief Justice, from 1860-1865, County Judge from 1866-1867 and County Clerk in 1868. He later moved to Kimble County where he died at the age of 83.) John and Eliza after their marriage lived in Brown County for a short while and then moved to San Saba County until 1866. He then moved to the Lanes's Chapel Community in Bosque, County where he was one of the first settlers. John and Eliza became the parents of ten children: Louisa, John William, Abraham Lincoln, Isabell, Mary, Thomas Jefferson, Vernice, Sowyel, Joseph and Lillard. Eliza died October 11, 1919 and John on January 16, 1924. They were buried in Lane's Chapel Cemetery. Soon after his arrival in Coryell County, Sowyel's next to the oldest son, Josiah Green met Susan Birtrong. Susan was the youngest daughter of Thomas B. Birtrong, who was fondly known throughout the county as Uncle Tom. Uncle Tom came to Texas from Louisiana in 1830. He married Elizabeth Riggs, a widow, in Austin County, Texas on October 1, 1837. He was granted a league and a labor of land by the Board of Land Commissioners of Austin County on January 24, 1838. He selected a tract of land in what was to become Coryell County on the headwaters of Coryell Creek. The Birtrong survey was located by Surveyor George Erath in 1841. Uncle Tom established a ranch on his survey and was constantly harassed by Indians. Susan Ann Birtrong and Josiah Cox were married on November 30, 1858.

Sowyel's oldest daughter Mary Jane had not come to Coryell County with the rest of the family but remained in Missouri. After losing her husband, she and her small daughter, Sarah Ann came to Texas to live with her father.

After losing his wife, Uncle Tom Birtrong married Mary Jane Cox Simpson at Sowyel's home on January 5, 1859. A son, Thomas B. Birtrong, Jr. was born to them in July, 1860. Uncle Tom and Mary Jane lived on their ranch near Jonesboro until about 1877 when he sold it. Loading his belongings in a wagon and driving his livestock forward, he drifted westward to Coleman County.

After Josiah and Susan were married they farmed and ranched next to Sowyel's homestead on the Leon River. Josiah was known as Cy Cox and in February, 1862 he along with two nephews and friends enlisted in Company "C" 24 Texas Calvary of the Confederate Army. After a short time he suffered a rapture and was discharged. After his discharge he purchased a tract from Hilman Arrowood in 1866 and added another tract from Sowyel in 1867. In 1869 Josiah sold this land to Josiah Culp for $490 and moved next to his father-in-law, Uncle Tom Birtrong on Coryell Creek. He bought land in the Samuel Riggs and G.W. Robinson Surveys where he ranched. In 1878 he sold his property in Coryell and moved to Comanche County near Sipes Springs. He lived there until 1880 when he moved to Rising Star in Eastland County. He bought a tract of 160 acres out of the J.H. Cooper Survey and also received a patent for 160 acres from the State of Texas which was located on School Lands near Rising Star. In 1890 he sold his land to his son-in-law John Cooper, loaded his belongings on a wagon and driving his livestock in front of him went west to get a better start. He lived in Grayson County for a short time and then moved to Gregg County which was claimed by the State of Texas. However after a lengthy lawsuit between the States of Oklahoma and Texas the United States Supreme court awarded the county to Oklahoma. Josiah lost everything to land speculators during this time. Broke and in failing health he returned to Rising Star where he was granted a Confederate pension in 1899. He lost his sight and became completely paralyzed by rheumatism. The last ten years of his life were spent bedridden and he died in Rising Star on January 12, 1913. His wife, Susan, lived until April 6, 1920. They are buried in the Rising Star Cemetery in Eastland County, Texas and were the parents of six children.

When Sowyel and Joseph Cox settled on the north bank of the Leon River south of Gatesville, they found that they already had a neighbor across the river on the south side. Nimrod Brown, and his sons, John M. and Joe, had taken title to 227 acres on the south side of the river. The families became fast friends and on January 4, 1859 John M. Brown and Sarah Cox, Sowyel's youngest daughter, were married. To this marriage there was to be given six sons. They were: Robert James born in 1859, Jefferson Davis "Turk" born 1862, Edmond N. born in 1864, George born in 1866, William born in 1868 and Rebel John born in 1870. After the first love of her life, her family, the church was the labor of her life and she was its staunchest supporter. Sarah died on December 20, 1871 leaving a grieving family and friends. She lies in the Gatesville City Cemetery between the most important men in her life, her father, Sowyel Cox and her husband, John M. Brown. Sowyel's youngest son Palonzo known to everyone as Pompey was born in Missouri in 1840. He was what people of the time called "Slow witted". He was the victim of mental retardation. He lived with his mother and father on their farm. One of the provisions of Sowyel's will stated "my son Palonzo Cox who at this mother's death, Louisa Cox, I want him to have all the aforesaid land above mentioned." Upon his mother's death, in 1882 his brother Joseph was appointed his guardian by the Court. During his lifetime he frequently visited his brother, John, who lived in the Lane's Chapel Community near Morshein. The county between the two homes was some of the wildest in Coryell County. Someone of the family would ride half-way with Pompey and meet another member of the family to complete the trip. In late Spring of 1883 after an argument with is brother, Joseph, he decided that he would go stay with his brother, John. So he left on the trip by himself. When he didn't arrive, a search was started. His horse was soon found and after a long and arduous search his remains were found. He had either become ill and fallen from his horse or had gotten knocked from his horse striking his head. Alone in the wilderness he had died from his injury. He was the first person to be buried in the Lane's Chapel Cemetery. His epitaph simply states "lost and died in the mountains, June 1883."

On December 14, 1869 Sowyel Cox departed this life. He was one of the sturdy pioneers that helped build this great country of ours. Kentucky, Illinois, Missouri, and Texas; he had helped civilization advance in all of them. His creed had always been first to build for your family, worship your Creator and give Him thanks for your many blessings. Sowyel's Creator had given him 71 years 9 months and 23 days.

After Sowyel's death, his wife, Louisa together with her son Palonzo continued to live on and work the farm. Her grand daughter Sara Ann Simpson married John Hamilton on June 16, 1874 and they lived with Louisa and Palonzo and helped take care of them and the farm. In appreciation Louisa before her death in 1882 deeded a 40 acre tract of land to Sara Ann.

On Christmas Eve, December 24, 1882 Louisa joined her husband in death. After 81 years, 4 months and 15 days her trip was over. Resting beside her husband in the Gatesville City Cemetery, after sharing the hardships and joys of pioneer living and existence, they await their rewards.

In 1882 or 1885 the heirs of Sowyel Cox sold the Sowyel Cox place to Stephen Blanchard. Joseph Cox and his sons besides operating the mill, farmed and raised cattle on their far on the Leon River.

In February 1862 Joseph's son George Washington and Thomas joined their Uncle Josiah in enlisting in Company "C" 24 Texas Calvary. Thomas Cox was sent to Arkansas and was captured by the Union forces at the battle of Arkansas Port on January 11, 1863. Three months later on March 19, 1863 Thomas Turpin Cox was dead at the tender age of 18 years, 8 months and 10 days.

On May 24, 1861 Sowyel Cox and his son Josiah joined other concerned citizens of Coryell County in petitioning the governor to permit them to raise a Mounted Ranging Company to be commanded by Hiram W. Cooke. The petition stated "that the Indians are now down on the frontier and our boys are anxious to drive them away." Governor Clark authorized its formation and one of the officers was John K. Shipman. Joseph's sons George Washington, Thomas and Joseph joined the company, as well as Josiah G. Cox and Sowyel's son-in-law, John M. Brown. The Ranging Company provided invaluable service in protecting the residents of Coryell County from the marauding Indians.

In about 1860 Joseph's oldest daughter, Louisa V. Cox married John K. Shipman. Four sons were born to this marriage: John David in 1862, George T. In1863, William K. in 1865 and Joseph in 1886. Louisa Cox Shipman died April 26, 1866 and is buried in Wood Cemetery in Coryell County, Texas.

George Washington Cox after his service in the Civil War came back to help his father, Joseph and his brothers, Joseph and Solomon run the mill on the Leon River.

In 1869 George Washington was married to Lucinda Jane Wise. This marriage was to be blessed with three children, a daughter and two sons. They were: Louisa who married John O. Bridges, Samuel who married Myrtle Johnson and Thomas who married Claudia Johnson.

In June 1860 Joseph Cox sold Joseph A. Haynes 90 arces off of his acreage on the Leon River. Then May 12, 1870 he sold the Joe Cox Mill Place containing 10 acres to D.W. Squires and G.W. Haley for $1,000.00. On June 1870 he paid John E. Elroy $4,500.00 for a 300 acre tract of the Vincent Mendez Survey. And on April 4, 1871 Joseph sold the residue of the original 200 acre tract to A.W. Wood. The old Joe Cox Mill passed into history evidently to lose its name. But a new life and identity awaited Joseph Cox.

One of the most important features of the new tract was the water supply. Located at the foot of a mountain and at the head of a draw was a cold, clear spring. It had run clear and cool from the mountain since its creation. Man and beast had used it as a place of watering and rest for unknown years. It was now to receive a new name "Cox Springs."

Joseph Cox built his house at the point where the draw widened out into the valley. A stove fireplace was built on its south end and due to the unevenness of the ground the front five or six feet was off the ground while the back was even with the ground. A separate building was constructed of logs to serve as the kitchen.. Then an important building was constructed next to the draw..the spring house.

To provide a water supply all that was needed was a little ingenuity.. The slopes of the mountains was covered with cedar. Joseph cut down cedars 8 to 10 inches in diameter and with an adz hollowed out to form a trough. He places them end to end from the spring down to the spring house and he had a ready made flume or pipe.

The water circulated through the spring house to provide a cooler for keeping eggs, milk, butter and perishables. After leaving the spring house the water went out to the troughs to water the livestock.

Countless numbers of Coryell County residents have enjoyed the coolness and beauty of Cox Spring. The cedar trough was constructed in about 1869 or 1870. The water as it ran down there left mineral deposits of limestone and they became as if petrified. They were still carrying water as late as 1946-1950. But the flow of the spring has diminished and the old troughs have finally become the victims of time and a few traces are all that remain, except in the minds of the people who have enjoyed the peacefulness of Cox Springs.

For a short time after moving to Cox Springs, Joseph and his sons George and Joseph operated a steam powered mill there. Joseph's whole family lived there for a while. Young Joseph and his wife, Susan were living there when their son William was born in January 1869. Joseph died there November 25, 1870 leaving a young widow and son. Susan later married T.B. Lewis.

George Washington Cox's three children were born there. In 1878 George moved his family to a farm on the Mary Beedlove Survey northeast of Gatesville. His wife, Jane, became ill with tuberculosis. In 1898 he sold his property on the Breedlove Surbey and moved to Haskell County, Texas to a better climate for his wife. In 1904, Jane lost her battle with tuberculosis and is buried in the Fairview Cemetery near the town of Sagerton, Texas. George sold his farm and moved back to Coryell County living near Killeen. He died there October 10, 1916 and is buried in the Gatesville City Cemetery.

In 1865 Joseph Cox's daughter Elizabeth married Napoleon "Bud" Kelly. Bud Kelly came to Coryell County in 1857 at the age of 16. He started a small ranch and by the time the Civil War erupted he had built his herd from a small herd to more than 200 head. He enlisted in the Confederate Army at the same time that the Cox boys had and served with valor throughout the conflict. He suffered a shoulder wound at the Battle of Yellow Bayou, Arkansas and it necessitated amputation of one of his arms. He returned to Coryell County and built up a large ranch near Arnett. It at one time consisted of 2,000 acres. Elizabeth and Napoleon reared a family of ten children.

In 1870, Joseph Cox's youngest daughter, Mary married James Wise. He was the son of Levi and Louisa Wise. They came to Coryell County shortly after the Civil War. James received a preemption grant of 160 acres from the State of Texas in 1873 or 1874. In about 1880 James and Mary sold their farm and moved to the Indian Territory of Oklahoma where their ten children were born. James C. Wise and Mary Wise are buried in the Rambur Cemetery, Asher, Oklahoma.

Solomon Turpin Cox, lived near his father all of his life. On January 13, 1875 he married Nancy Elizabeth Veazy, the daughter of Styles and Mary O'Keefe Veazy. She was 14 years old when they married. Solomon built a cabin near his father's at Cox Spring. Solomon and Lizzie were to rear a family of 5. They were: Mary Elizabeth who married Walsey "Boye" Spence; Jennie, who married Sidney Lee; Cora who married Walter J. Spence; Frankie who married Walter D. Clemens. He and Lizzie also raised Lama and Nadine Spence, his grand daughters after the death of their Cora in 1909. After the death of his father he was deeded the farm at Cox Spring by the other heirs in appreciation of his devotion to his father. Solomon died December 8, 1937 and his wife, Nancy Elizabeth survived him until July 16, 1946. They are buried in the Gatesville City Cemetery.

The last of Joseph Cox children, Samuel Dale, was living with his father when he married Julia Hobbs on March 3, 1877. His four sons, Solomon Turpin (1881), Dan Sems (1883), Alfred Elmer (1888) and David Thomas (1890) were all born at Cox Spring. In 1889 be bought a farm on the Joseph Branham Survey near Levita. He died there November 1, 1904 at the age of 49. His Julia died December 11, 1929. On December 7, 1878 Joseph's wife of 39 years, Phebe, died at Cox Spring.

On April 7, 1879 Joseph Cox married Sara Ann Lam Rogers, a widow with five small children. Sara Ann was the daughter of Alvey Anderson Lam and Jane Graham. She was born in Bedford County, Tennessee, January 27, 1840. She and her family lived in Illinois and Iowa before moving to Missouri where she met Washington Rogers. After her children were born in Missouri she and Washington moved to Dallas County, Texas. It was there that Washington was stricken and died leaving her with five small children. When her brother, John I. Lam of the Mound learned of her plight he sent a wagon and driver to Dallas County to bring her to live with him. Her five children were: Sterling Price, Samantha, Sarah Jane, Washington LaFayette and Elizabeth Monroe. On August 25, 1883, a son Richard, was born to Joseph and Sara Ann.

In about 1898 or 1899 while Richard and his father Joseph were roofing a barn, Joseph fell breaking his hip. At age 80 the healing process was slow and although Joseph eventually was able to walk, he never completely recovered. However, he continued to work his farm and ranch.

Finally on October 19, 1908 Joseph M. Cox, age 90, succumbed to old age. His death certificate simply states that he died from old age and exhaustion. Another pioneer and builder gone. Sara Ann Cox died at home of her son Richard Cox in McLennan County on December 6, 1930 at age 90.

Richard Cox married Hattie Bell Humkphries, daughter of Matthew D. Humphries and Sallie Redford at Gatesville on May 19, 1907. They reared a family of six; Harvie Mathew, Nellie May, Ruby Bell, Joseph Richard, Hattie Estell and Doud. All were born in Coryell County, Texas. With his passing an era ended. He was the last of the Pioneers that carried the Cox name. From this sturdy stock however, there are descendants scattered all over the United States. A heritage to be proud of regardless if the name is Cox, Brown, Kelly or whoever.

[Turner Master File.FTW]




More About SOWYEL COX:
Burial: Unknown, GATESVILLE CITY CEMETERY65
     
Children of LOUISA MOXLEY and SOWYEL COX are:
6. i.   JOHN WILLIAM4 COX, b. November 28, 1837, CLARK CO. MISSOURI; d. January 10, 1924, LANES CHAPEL, BOSQUE CO. TEXAS.
7. ii.   JOSEPH MATTHEW COX, b. September 26, 1818, SIMPSON,FRANKLIN CO.KENTUCKEY; d. October 19, 1908, COX SPRING CORYELL CO. TX.
8. iii.   MARY JANE COX, b. 1828, MECHANICSBURG TOWNSHIP, SANGAMON CO. ILLINOIS; d. Unknown.
  iv.   NANCY COX66,67, b. 1830, MECHANICSBURG TOWNSHIP, SANGAMON CO. ILLINOIS; d. Unknown; m. DANIAL WOOD, 1846, CLARK CO. MISSOURI; d. Unknown.
  v.   LOUISA COX68,69, b. 1834, MECHANICSBURG TOWNSHIP, SANGAMON CO. ILLINOIS; d. Unknown; m. DONY TULL, 1852, CLARK CO. MISSOURI; d. Unknown.
  vi.   JOSIAH COX70,71, b. 1836, MECHANICSBURG TOWNSHIP, SANGAMON CO. ILLINOIS; d. January 12, 1913, RISING STAR, TEXAS; m. SUSAN BIRTRONG, November 30, 1858, CORYELL CO. TX.; d. April 06, 1920, RISING STAR, TEXAS.
  Notes for JOSIAH COX:
After Josiah and Susan were married they farmed and ranched next to Sowyel's homestead on the Leon River. Josiah was known as Cy Cox and in February, 1862 he along with two nephews and friends enlisted in Company "C" 24 Texas Calvary of the Confederate Army. After a short time he suffered a rapture and was discharged. After his discharge he purchased a tract from Hilman Arrowood in 1866 and added another tract from Sowyel in 1867. In 1869 Josiah sold this land to Josiah Culp for $490 and moved next to his father-in-law, Uncle Tom Birtrong on Coryell Creek. He bought land in the Samuel Riggs and G.W. Robinson Surveys where he ranched. In 1878 he sold his property in Coryell and moved to Comanche County near Sipes Springs. He lived there until 1880 when he moved to Rising Star in Eastland County. He bought a tract of 160 acres out of the J.H. Cooper Survey and also received a patent for 160 acres from the State of Texas which was located on School Lands near Rising Star. In 1890 he sold his land to his son-in-law John Cooper, loaded his belongings on a wagon and driving his livestock in front of him went west to get a better start. He lived in Grayson County for a short time and then moved to Gregg County which was claimed by the State of Texas. However after a lengthy lawsuit between the States of Oklahoma and Texas the United States Supreme court awarded the county to Oklahoma. Josiah lost everything to land speculators during this time. Broke and in failing health he returned to Rising Star where he was granted a Confederate pension in 1899. He lost his sight and became completely paralyzed by rheumatism. The last ten years of his life were spent bedridden and he died in Rising Star on January 12, 1913. His wife, Susan, lived until April 6, 1920. They are buried in the Rising Star Cemetery in Eastland County, Texas and were the parents of six children.

  More About JOSIAH COX:
Burial: Unknown, RISING STAR CEMETERY

  More About SUSAN BIRTRONG:
Burial: Unknown, RISING STAR CEMETERY

  vii.   PLANZO (POMPEY) COX72,73,74, b. April 02, 1840, CLARK CO. MISSOURI; d. June 1880, BURRIED LANE CHAPEL CEM.BOSQUE CO.TX..
  Notes for PLANZO (POMPEY) COX:
Sowyel's youngest son Palonzo known to everyone as Pompey was born in Missouri in 1840. He was what people of the time called "Slow witted". He was the victim of mental retardation. He lived with his mother and father on their farm. One of the provisions of Sowyel's will stated "my son Palonzo Cox who at this mother's death, Louisa Cox, I want him to have all the aforesaid land above mentioned." Upon his mother's death, in 1882 his brother Joseph was appointed his guardian by the Court. During his lifetime he frequently visited his brother, John, who lived in the Lane's Chapel Community near Moshein. The county between the two homes was some of the wildest in Coryell County. Someone of the family would ride half-way with Pompey and meet another member of the family to complete the trip. In late Spring of 1883 after an argument with is brother, Joseph, he decided that he would go stay with his brother, John. So he left on the trip by himself. When he didn't arrive, a search was started. His horse was soon found and after a long and arduous search his remains were found. He had either become ill and fallen from his horse or had gotten knocked from his horse striking his head. Alone in the wilderness he had died from his injury. He was the first person to be buried in the Lane's Chapel Cemetery. His epitaph simply states "lost and died in the mountains, June 1883."


9. viii.   SARAH CATHERINE COX, b. February 1844, LEWIS CO MISSOURI NEAR FAIRMONT; d. December 20, 1871, GATESVILLE,CORYELL CO. TX..


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