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View Tree for Capt. Aaron O. Van CleaveCapt. Aaron O. Van Cleave (b. 26 Jul 1711, d. 01 Jun 1795)

Aaron O. Van Cleave (son of Isbrandt Van Cleef)515, 516 was born 26 Jul 1711 in Staten Island, New Utrecht, Kings Co., New York, United States, and died 01 Jun 1795 in Salisbury, Rowan Co., NC. He married Rachel Schenck on 24 Sep 1734 in New York City, New York, daughter of Jan Roelofse Schenck and Sara Willemse Van Kouwenhoven.

 Includes NotesNotes for Aaron O. Van Cleave:
Aaron Sr. lived in New Jersey [& NC], where he raised his family. When the War of the Revolution began Aaron's seven sons all went into the army. They were stout, tall and hardy. We do not know how long the sons remained in the army, some probably until it closed. It is said by [Uncle] Jonathan Van Cleave that all the sons of old Aaron were in the Army except Billy. His wife was a Tory, and would not let him go. It seems that all the sons married in New Jersey [NC]. It is thought that Aaron Sr. died in Monmouth [Co], New Jersey [Rowan Co, NC], but at what time is not known [1780]. His sons went west. One went to Ohio, where his history is lost. Samuel went to Virginia to live and but little is known of him. It is thought that his descendents were heard from later. It came about this way. Elders Jonathan and Matthias Van Cleave had attended a Baptist Association and took an active part. Thier names were published in the minutes of the association in the 'Baptist Herald' a paper published by a man named Beahy. This paper was seen by a Van Cleave in Virginia who wrote to [Elder] Matthius Van Cleave of Crawfordsville, Indiana, but Elder Matthius was not able to learn anything of his history, so Uncle Matthius came to see Uncle Jonathan and Aunt Betsy, and between them they made out a historical report of the early history of the Van Cleaves in America, beginning with Aaron Sr., the progenitor. They felt confident that the man in Virginia was a descendent of Samuel and related to them. They never heard from the man again, lost the letter and address

Capt. Aaron Van Cleave was born circa 1704 at Staten Island, Richmond County, New York. Capt. Aaron Van Cleave was born circa 1710 at Staten Island, Richmond County, New York. Capt. Aaron Van Cleave was born on July 26, 1711 at New Utrecht, Kings County, New York. Capt. Aaron Van Cleave was the son of Isbrand Van Cleve and Janetje Aerse Vanderbilt. Capt. Aaron Van Cleave married Rachel Schenck, daughter of Jan Roelofse Schenck and Sara Willemse Van Kouwenhoven, in September, 1734 at New York City, New York County, New York. Capt. Aaron Van Cleave married Rachel Schenck, daughter of Jan Roelofse Schenck and Sara Willemse Van Kouwenhoven, on September 24, 1734 at Princeton, Mercer County, New Jersey. Capt. Aaron Van Cleave died circa 1780 at Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina. Capt. Aaron Van Cleave was buried after 1780 at Burning Ridge Cemetery, Salisbury, North Carolina. Capt. Aaron Van Cleave was buried at Joppa Cemetery, Salisbury, North Carolina.
Capt. Aaron Van Cleave was also known as Capt. Aaron. Van Cleef. Capt. Aaron Van Cleave was also known as Capt. Aaron Van Cleve. Capt. Aaron Van Cleave resided at at Rowan County, North Carolina, circa 1751. The Van Cleef Family by Wilson V. Ledley (Library of Congress #75-7491)

The following is copied from a manuscript loaned by R.S. Harvey:
Aaron Van Cleef was born, presumably about 1711, on Staten Island, the son
of Isabrant and Janneke Van der Bilt Van Cleef. He removed to New Jersey and
on September 24, 1734 he married at Middletown to Rachel Schenck, who was born
about 1709. So far as known Aaron was the first member of the family to spell
the name Van Cleave with an "A".
On October 17, 1737, Reuben Ruynon and Aaron Van Cleave were appointed
"chimney viewers" for the town of New Brunswick, and at the time Mayor James
Jude took office, that town was credited with ninety-one freeholders, among
them being Aaron and Benjamin Van Cleave. Therefore, Aaron must have moved to
New Brunswick shortly after his marriage.
It is said that Aaron and his brother Benjamin, were partners in some sort
of business, but what kind is not known. They became involved in debt, which
caused Aaron to move to North Carolina.
It seems that Aaron Van Cleave at one time was engaged in the coast-wise
trade as the Captain of a trading vessel. In the volume of newspaper
clippings, published as part of the Archives of New Jersey, are found various
references, to wits...
Van Cleave entered the Port of Boston, from Perth Amboy
(Boston New Letter, 22 Sep 1843)
Boston out, for Perth Amboy, 10 Oct 1748, Van Clief
(New York Postboy, 17 Oct 1743)
Boston out, 19 Oct Van Cleave for Perth Amboy
(News Letter 20 Oct 1743)
Custom House, Rhode Island, 16 Mar, Van Cleave from Perth Amboy.
(Postboy, 16 Apr 1744)
Newport, Rhode Island, 29 Jun, entered Aaron Van Cleave from Perth
Amboy.
Custom House, Boston, cleared Aaron Van Cleave, for Amboy.
(Boston New Letter 11 Oct 1744)
The will of Joseph Williams, of Squam, Monmouth County, N.J. 25 Jan 1763,
proved 11 Oct 1766, states that the sum of One Hundred Pounds was to be
collected from Captain Van Cleef, brother of Benjamin Van Cleef of Monmouth.
Aaron Van Cleef was a witness to the will of Alexander Henry, of New
Brunswick, Somerset County, N.J., 18 Mar 1744. In the spring of 1751 Aaron emigrated from New Brunswick, with his family,
and on 1 May 1751 he arrived at the forks of the Yadkin River, in Rowan County,
North Carolina, where he settled and spent the remainder of his life. At that
time the family is said to have consisted of the father, mother, seven sons and
one daughter.
In the Courthouse at Salisbury, North Carolina is the original record of
deed by which Daniel Boone transferred 640 acres of land to Aaron Van Cleave
for the sum of 80 pounds "Proclamation money of the State of North Carolina".
This deed is dated 21 Feb 1764 and was proved of record in the April 1764 term
of Court. It was signed by Daniel Boone and Rachel Boone, who made her mark
and witnessed by Thomas H. Holman, Samuel Bailey, who made his mark, and
Benjamin Van Cleave. The County Clerk was John Hiscock. The deed describes
the land, which was the first home of the Boones at the forks of the Yadkin
River, and shows the transfer of the tract on 29 Dec 1753, from the original
grant by the "Right Honorable John" Earl of Granville, to Squire Boone. On 12
Dec 1759, Daniel Boone, Planter bought this tract from his father for fifty
pounds.
Aaron Van Cleave at one time served as Constable in an for the "Lower end
of the Forks" of the Yadkin. He was one of the leaders of the group that met
at the "Dutchman's Creek Meeting House".
He is said to have attended and participated in the meetings in N.C. which
resulted in the appointment of the Committee of Patriots that drafted the
famous Hecklenburg "Declaration of Independence" 20 May 1775.
Aaron Van Cleave died in 1780 and is buried in the Burning Ridge Cemetery
at the forks of the Yadkin. His wife, Rachel, is said to be buried there also,
but whether she died before or after Aaron is not known. A tract of land was
granted in Kentucky in 5 Mar 1782 to Rachel Van Cleave. (Note: this is
probably Rachel Ryker-Van Cleave, the second wife of John Van Cleave, son of
Aaron). The will of William Van Cleave, in Mercer County, KY, 2 Sep 1786 was
witnessed by Rachel Van Cleave. Whether either of these was the widow of Aaron
is not known.
Of the seven sons of Aaron, one, Samuel, is said to have gone to Virginia,
and one, Thisgen, to Ohio. Of these two nothing more is known, except that a
descendant of Samuel once visited Rev. Johnathan Van Cleave at Crawfordsville,
Indiana.
The other five sons, with their sister Jane, went to Kentucky with the
Boones. John about 1775, William and Benjamin in 1776, Jane in 1777, and Ralph
and Aaron Jr. in 1785.
An undated petition in North Carolina, shortly prior to 1775, was signed
by Aaron, Benjamin, Ralph and William Van Cleave.
The families of William, Benjamin, and Jane settled first at Lynn's
Station and the Little Beargrass, a few miles from the Falls of the Ohio.

Capt. Aaron VAN_CLEAVE was born about 1704 in Staten Island, , New York. He died in 1780 in Salisbury, , North Carolina. He was buried in Joppa Cemetery, Salisbury, North Carolina. As an adult he settled in New Brunswick where he and his brother Benjamin were listed as freeholders in 1748 and 1750 and where they were in business together. Aaron is said to have gone on a bond for a friend for which he had to pay, and, because of this loss, he moved to Rowan County, North carolina in May 1750. He had been reported in the "Boston Weekly News Letters" as sailing between Boston and Perth Amboy 1743-44. He bought a farm from Daniel Boone and Rebecca, his wife, 21 February 1764, when the latter went to Kentucky for the first time. His descendants all used the spelling "Van Cleave" some times written as one word. He was married to Rachel SCHENCK on 24 Sep 1734 in Princeton, Mercer Co. New Jersey.

Moved to North Carolina about 1750. He participated in the Mecklenburg
Convention and its declaration of 20 May 1775.

(See other branch of tree)Aaron and Rachel are buried in the Burying Ground Ridge Cemetery (Now the Old Joppa Ridge Presbyterian Church Graveyard Cemetery), located at the forks of theYadkin River near the present day town of Mocksville, 21 miles north of Salisbury, in Rowan (now Davie County, North Carolina.
Note:Aaron Van Cleave purchased the farm of Daniel Boone in 1764 in Rowan Co., North Carolina. The 5 Van Cleave brothers came to Kentucky in the fall of 1775 with their brother-in-law Squire Boone who had married their sister Jane in 1765 in North Carolina. Their land claims in Kentucky were upheld in Virginia Land Company by Squire Boone,who represented them. Samuel was captured by the Indians when the families were at Boones Station (not Fort Boonesborough) north of the Kentucky river in what is now Shelby county, Kentucky. This station was involved in a series of Indian attacks that culminated in the infamous Long Run Creek battle on September 15, 1781. At that time Squire Boone was still suffering the effects of two gun shot wounds. One to his chest and the other which shattered his arm from an earlier battle in May. Several of the Van Cleave women and children were killedby the Indians in this time period. The letter which Dwayne Meyer has a copy,is from Samuel Graham who describes his arrival in Kentucky in 1790 and his neighbors, the Van Cleaves and is written to the Kentucky minister John D. Shane,who gave his letter collection to Lyman C. Draper, another minister who also collected these letters. He was baptized July 26, 1711 on Staten Island, Richmond Co.,New York. He was the first of the family to spell the name with an A...VanCleave instead of VanCleve. On October 16, 1737, Aaron was appointedChimney Viewer for NewBrunswick. This occupation entailed inspecting the chimneys tobe sure they were free of soot, which caused fires. Aaron and his brother Benjamin entered into a shipping businesspartnership together. Benjamin handled the business affairswhile Aaron captained their ship, in this coast- widetradeventure. They continued in this business until both had largefamilies. Many newspaper articles in the Boston WeeklyNewsletter and the New York Weekly Post, mention Aaronskippering vessels along the Northeast coast: "Van Cleaveentered the Port of Boston from Perth Amboy" (September 22,1743; Boston Weekly Newsletter}, "Boston out for Perth Amboy"October 10, 1743, Van Clief' (October 17, 1743; New York WeeklyPost-Boy}, "Boston, October 19, out, Van Cleave for Perth Amboy"(October 20, 1743: Boston Weekly Newsletter}, "Custom House,Rhode Island, March 16, Van Cleave from Perth Amboy" (March 19,17 44; New York Weekly Post-Boy} , "Newport , Rhode Island, June29, entered Van Cleave from Perth Amboy," "Custom House, Boston,cleared Aaron Van Cleave for Amboy" (October 11, 1744; BostonWeekly Newsletter). Aaron and Benjamin terminated their shipping business because ofskepticism in one of their shipping ventures involving asecurity debt, to which Aaron had to pay. This caused theselling of their business and the reduction of both theirwealth's.
Aaron is listed as living in Freehold, Monmouth County, NewJersey, in 1748 and 1750. Aaron moved his family to the Forks ofthe Yadkin River, in Rowan County, North Carolina; arriving May1, 1750. Here he took up farming. On May 2, 1763 Aaron purchased 766 acres of land locatednearthe Jersey Baptist Church in Rowan County (now Davidson County),North Carolina, for 57L 10s, from Henry McCulloh, who receivedthe land in 1745 as part ofa 100,000 acre tract from KingGeorge II. It was officially deeded October 14, 1763. Hemortgaged this same 766 acres of land on December 7, 1763, for73L. It was official on January 12, 1764.Aaron's neighbor was Squire Boone. Sr.. formerly fromSchuylkiln. Pennsylvania. On December 29, 1753 John, the Earl ofGranville, conveyed to Squire Boone, Sr., a 640 acre tract ofland received in a patent granted him by King George II. SquireBoone soldthis Granville Tract to his son Daniel on October 12.1759. Daniel Boone and his wife Rebecca sold these 640 acres.located on the east side of Bear Creek in St. Luke Parish. toAaron Van Cleave. In the Court house in Salisbury, NC is theoriginal record of the deed by which Daniel Boone transferred640 acres of land to Aaron VanCleave for the sum of 80 poundsproclamation money of the State of North Carolina. This deed isdated 21 Feb 1764 and was proved of record in the April 1764term of the court. It was signed by Daniel Boone and RachelBoone, who made her mark and witnessed by Thomas Holman, SamuelBailey, who made his mark, and Benjamin VanCleave. Daniel Boone sold this tract of land. located at the Forks of the YadkinRiver, in Rowan County , North Carolina, so he could venturewest to the new lands of Kentucky. On January 16, 1768/69, Aaron Van Cleave was appointed Constableof the lower end of the Forks of the Yadkin River, Rowan County,North Carolina. On February 15, 1769 he was fined, as Constable,for non-appearance in court .On February 17, 1769 hisappointment as Constable was rescinded. Compilation done by Alan Ray Wenzel. c 1989
titled The Pioneers The Van Cleave Family Volume II. Again Ihave added my research in Chronology.

Aaron and Rachel are buried in the Burying Ground Ridge Cemetery (Now the Old Joppa Ridge Presbyterian Church Graveyard Cemetery), located at the forks of theYadkin River near the present day town of Mocksville, 21 miles north of Salisbury, in Rowan (now Davie County, North Carolina.
Note:Aaron Van Cleave purchased the farm of Daniel Boone in 1764 in Rowan Co., North Carolina. The 5 Van Cleave brothers came to Kentucky in the fall of 1775 with their brother-in-law Squire Boone who had married their sister Jane in 1765 in North Carolina. Their land claims in Kentucky were upheld in Virginia Land Company by Squire Boone,who represented them. Samuel was captured by the Indians when the families were at Boones Station (not Fort Boonesborough) north of the Kentucky river in what is now Shelby county, Kentucky. This station was involved in a series of Indian attacks that culminated in the infamous Long Run Creek battle on September 15, 1781. At that time Squire Boone was still suffering the effects of two gun shot wounds. One to his chest and the other which shattered his arm from an earlier battle in May. Several of the Van Cleave women and children were killedby the Indians in this time period. The letter which Dwayne Meyer has a copy,is from Samuel Graham who describes his arrival in Kentucky in 1790 and his neighbors, the Van Cleaves and is written to the Kentucky minister John D. Shane,who gave his letter collection to Lyman C. Draper, another minister who also collected these letters. He was baptized July 26, 1711 on Staten Island, Richmond Co.,New York. He was the first of the family to spell the name with an A...VanCleave instead of VanCleve. On October 16, 1737, Aaron was appointedChimney Viewer for NewBrunswick. This occupation entailed inspecting the chimneys tobe sure they were free of soot, which caused fires. Aaron and his brother Benjamin entered into a shipping businesspartnership together. Benjamin handled the business affairswhile Aaron captained their ship, in this coast- widetradeventure. They continued in this business until both had largefamilies. Many newspaper articles in the Boston WeeklyNewsletter and the New York Weekly Post, mention Aaronskippering vessels along the Northeast coast: "Van Cleaveentered the Port of Boston from Perth Amboy" (September 22,1743; Boston Weekly Newsletter}, "Boston out for Perth Amboy"October 10, 1743, Van Clief' (October 17, 1743; New York WeeklyPost-Boy}, "Boston, October 19, out, Van Cleave for Perth Amboy"(October 20, 1743: Boston Weekly Newsletter}, "Custom House,Rhode Island, March 16, Van Cleave from Perth Amboy" (March 19,17 44; New York Weekly Post-Boy} , "Newport , Rhode Island, June29, entered Van Cleave from Perth Amboy," "Custom House, Boston,cleared Aaron Van Cleave for Amboy" (October 11, 1744; BostonWeekly Newsletter). Aaron and Benjamin terminated their shipping business because ofskepticism in one of their shipping ventures involving asecurity debt, to which Aaron had to pay. This caused theselling of their business and the reduction of both theirwealth's.
Aaron is listed as living in Freehold, Monmouth County, NewJersey, in 1748 and 1750. Aaron moved his family to the Forks ofthe Yadkin River, in Rowan County, North Carolina; arriving May1, 1750. Here he took up farming. On May 2, 1763 Aaron purchased 766 acres of land locatednearthe Jersey Baptist Church in Rowan County (now Davidson County),North Carolina, for 57L 10s, from Henry McCulloh, who receivedthe land in 1745 as part ofa 100,000 acre tract from KingGeorge II. It was officially deeded October 14, 1763. Hemortgaged this same 766 acres of land on December 7, 1763, for73L. It was official on January 12, 1764.Aaron's neighbor was Squire Boone. Sr.. formerly fromSchuylkiln. Pennsylvania. On December 29, 1753 John, the Earl ofGranville, conveyed to Squire Boone, Sr., a 640 acre tract ofland received in a patent granted him by King George II. SquireBoone soldthis Granville Tract to his son Daniel on October 12.1759. Daniel Boone and his wife Rebecca sold these 640 acres.located on the east side of Bear Creek in St. Luke Parish. toAaron Van Cleave. In the Court house in Salisbury, NC is theoriginal record of the deed by which Daniel Boone transferred640 acres of land to Aaron VanCleave for the sum of 80 poundsproclamation money of the State of North Carolina. This deed isdated 21 Feb 1764 and was proved of record in the April 1764term of the court. It was signed by Daniel Boone and RachelBoone, who made her mark and witnessed by Thomas Holman, SamuelBailey, who made his mark, and Benjamin VanCleave. Daniel Boone sold this tract of land. located at the Forks of the YadkinRiver, in Rowan County , North Carolina, so he could venturewest to the new lands of Kentucky. On January 16, 1768/69, Aaron Van Cleave was appointed Constableof the lower end of the Forks of the Yadkin River, Rowan County,North Carolina. On February 15, 1769 he was fined, as Constable,for non-appearance in court .On February 17, 1769 hisappointment as Constable was rescinded. Compilation done by Alan Ray Wenzel. c 1989
titled The Pioneers The Van Cleave Family Volume II. Again Ihave added my research in Chronology.

(See other branch of tree)Aaron and Rachel are buried in the Burying Ground Ridge Cemetery (Now the Old Joppa Ridge Presbyterian Church Graveyard Cemetery), located at the forks of theYadkin River near the present day town of Mocksville, 21 miles north of Salisbury, in Rowan (now Davie County, North Carolina.
Note:Aaron Van Cleave purchased the farm of Daniel Boone in 1764 in Rowan Co., North Carolina. The 5 Van Cleave brothers came to Kentucky in the fall of 1775 with their brother-in-law Squire Boone who had married their sister Jane in 1765 in North Carolina. Their land claims in Kentucky were upheld in Virginia Land Company by Squire Boone,who represented them. Samuel was captured by the Indians when the families were at Boones Station (not Fort Boonesborough) north of the Kentucky river in what is now Shelby county, Kentucky. This station was involved in a series of Indian attacks that culminated in the infamous Long Run Creek battle on September 15, 1781. At that time Squire Boone was still suffering the effects of two gun shot wounds. One to his chest and the other which shattered his arm from an earlier battle in May. Several of the Van Cleave women and children were killedby the Indians in this time period. The letter which Dwayne Meyer has a copy,is from Samuel Graham who describes his arrival in Kentucky in 1790 and his neighbors, the Van Cleaves and is written to the Kentucky minister John D. Shane,who gave his letter collection to Lyman C. Draper, another minister who also collected these letters. He was baptized July 26, 1711 on Staten Island, Richmond Co.,New York. He was the first of the family to spell the name with an A...VanCleave instead of VanCleve. On October 16, 1737, Aaron was appointedChimney Viewer for NewBrunswick. This occupation entailed inspecting the chimneys tobe sure they were free of soot, which caused fires. Aaron and his brother Benjamin entered into a shipping businesspartnership together. Benjamin handled the business affairswhile Aaron captained their ship, in this coast- widetradeventure. They continued in this business until both had largefamilies. Many newspaper articles in the Boston WeeklyNewsletter and the New York Weekly Post, mention Aaronskippering vessels along the Northeast coast: "Van Cleaveentered the Port of Boston from Perth Amboy" (September 22,1743; Boston Weekly Newsletter}, "Boston out for Perth Amboy"October 10, 1743, Van Clief' (October 17, 1743; New York WeeklyPost-Boy}, "Boston, October 19, out, Van Cleave for Perth Amboy"(October 20, 1743: Boston Weekly Newsletter}, "Custom House,Rhode Island, March 16, Van Cleave from Perth Amboy" (March 19,17 44; New York Weekly Post-Boy} , "Newport , Rhode Island, June29, entered Van Cleave from Perth Amboy," "Custom House, Boston,cleared Aaron Van Cleave for Amboy" (October 11, 1744; BostonWeekly Newsletter). Aaron and Benjamin terminated their shipping business because ofskepticism in one of their shipping ventures involving asecurity debt, to which Aaron had to pay. This caused theselling of their business and the reduction of both theirwealth's.
Aaron is listed as living in Freehold, Monmouth County, NewJersey, in 1748 and 1750. Aaron moved his family to the Forks ofthe Yadkin River, in Rowan County, North Carolina; arriving May1, 1750. Here he took up farming. On May 2, 1763 Aaron purchased 766 acres of land locatednearthe Jersey Baptist Church in Rowan County (now Davidson County),North Carolina, for 57L 10s, from Henry McCulloh, who receivedthe land in 1745 as part ofa 100,000 acre tract from KingGeorge II. It was officially deeded October 14, 1763. Hemortgaged this same 766 acres of land on December 7, 1763, for73L. It was official on January 12, 1764.Aaron's neighbor was Squire Boone. Sr.. formerly fromSchuylkiln. Pennsylvania. On December 29, 1753 John, the Earl ofGranville, conveyed to Squire Boone, Sr., a 640 acre tract ofland received in a patent granted him by King George II. SquireBoone soldthis Granville Tract to his son Daniel on October 12.1759. Daniel Boone and his wife Rebecca sold these 640 acres.located on the east side of Bear Creek in St. Luke Parish. toAaron Van Cleave. In the Court house in Salisbury, NC is theoriginal record of the deed by which Daniel Boone transferred640 acres of land to Aaron VanCleave for the sum of 80 poundsproclamation money of the State of North Carolina. This deed isdated 21 Feb 1764 and was proved of record in the April 1764term of the court. It was signed by Daniel Boone and RachelBoone, who made her mark and witnessed by Thomas Holman, SamuelBailey, who made his mark, and Benjamin VanCleave. Daniel Boone sold this tract of land. located at the Forks of the YadkinRiver, in Rowan County , North Carolina, so he could venturewest to the new lands of Kentucky. On January 16, 1768/69, Aaron Van Cleave was appointed Constableof the lower end of the Forks of the Yadkin River, Rowan County,North Carolina. On February 15, 1769 he was fined, as Constable,for non-appearance in court .On February 17, 1769 hisappointment as Constable was rescinded. Compilation done by Alan Ray Wenzel. c 1989
titled The Pioneers The Van Cleave Family Volume II. Again Ihave added my research in Chronology.



More About Aaron O. Van Cleave:
Date born 2: 26 Jul 1711
Date born 3: 26 Jul 1711, New Utrecht, Kings County, NY.
Burial 1: Joppa Cemetery, Salisbury, NC.
Burial 2: “buried at the Forks ofthe Yadkin in North Carolina.".
Burial 3: 1780, Burning Ridge Cemetery, Salisbury, , NC or Joppa Cemetery, Salisbury, NC.
Burial 4: 1780, Joppa Cemetery, Salisbury, NC.
Died 2: 1780, Rowan, NC.
Occupation: Ship's captain in costal trade.

More About Aaron O. Van Cleave and Rachel Schenck:
Marriage 1: 24 Sep 1734, New York City, New York.
Marriage 2: 24 Sep 1734, Middletown, Monmouth Co., New Jersey.
Marriage 3: 24 Sep 1734, Princeton, New Jersey.

Children of Aaron O. Van Cleave and Rachel Schenck are:
  1. +John Van Cleave, b. 26 Apr 1736, Port Richmond, Staten Island, New York, d. 12 May 1812, Jefferson County, Indiana.
  2. Thisgen Van Cleave, b. 1735, in NJ.
  3. Samuel Van Cleef, b. 1735, in Monmouth Co, NJ, d., VA.
  4. Cornelius "Cory" Van Cleave, b. 1737, in NJ.
  5. Charity Van Cleef, b. 1739, NJ.
  6. +Benjamin Samuel Van Cleave, b. 15 Nov 1741, New Brunswick, Middlesex, New Jersey, d. 27 Jul 1819, Bullskin Creek, Shelby Co, KY.
  7. +William Van Cleave, b. 1743, in Monmouth Co, NJ, d. 1786, in Mercer County, KY.
  8. +Aaron Van Cleave, b. 1745, in New Brunswick, Middlesex County, NJ, d. Dec 1813, in Salt Creek, Bearstown, Washington Co, KY.
  9. +Roleph (Ralph) Van Cleave, b. 10 May 1747, New Brunswick, Middlesex County, NJ, d. 15 Sep 1798, Shelby County, Kentucky.
  10. +Jane Van Cleave, b. 16 Oct 1749, New Brunswick, Middlesex, NJ, d. 10 Mar 1829, Otter Creek, Meade, KY.
  11. Cary Van Cleave.
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