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Ancestors of Chelsea Nicole Waggener


      2760. Daniel Doane, born 1664 in Eastham, Massachusetts; died September 01, 1743 in Newton, Bucks Co., Pennsylvania. He was the son of 5520. Daniel Doane and 5521. Constance Snow. He married 2761. Mechitabel Twining Abt. 1686 in Eastham, Massachusetts.

      2761. Mechitabel Twining, born March 08, 1660/61; died December 20, 1719. She was the daughter of 5522. William Twining and 5523. Elizabeth Deane.

Notes for Daniel Doane:
From WFT Vol. 1- #1670:

Daniel Doane joined the Society of Friends at the Sandwich Monthly Meeting on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. On March 17, 1696, they requested a certificate and moved to Newtown in Bucks Co., Pennsylvania, where they were received in 1699. He purchased 78 acres, just south of Newtown, in 1702 from James Yates for 21 pounds sterling.

The Middletown Meeting sent committees to him in 1710/11, which were met with "unseemly expressions" and "contemptuous flouts", causing his disownment. He was accused of meddling in astrology and prediction, especially "as to ye man's wife that came to such an untimely end". He claimed not to be connected in any way to it.

The additional 22 acres adjoining his farm were purchased from Yates on January 2, 1713. He reportedly married his second wife Mary Yates. (Possibly confused with Mary Price Hancock, but seemed to be confirmed by WFT #3665). His will was signed October 4, 1731 and proved December 31, 1743, contains references to wife Mary and all of his children.
     
Children of Daniel Doane and Mechitabel Twining are:
  1380 i.   Joseph Doan, born February 23, 1696/97 in Middletown MM, Bucks Co, Pennsylvania; died Aft. 1754 in Cane Creek, Orange Co., North Carolina; married Mary Carter October 14, 1726 in Middletown MM, Bucks Co, Pennsylvania.
  ii.   Daniel Doane, born November 23, 1687 in Cape Cod, Massachusetts; died Unknown; married Ann Baynes January 01, 1715/16 in Middletown MM, Bucks Co, Pennsylvania; born June 28, 1698; died Unknown in Middletown MM, Bucks Co, Pennsylvania.
  iii.   Lydia Doan, born October 30, 1690 in Cape Cod, Massachusetts; died Unknown; married Thomas Stradling August 05, 1715 in Middletown MM, Bucks Co, Pennsylvania; born Unknown; died Unknown.
  iv.   Eleazer Doan, born December 21, 1691 in Cape Cod, Massachusetts; died September 21, 1757 in Wrighstown, Bucks Co., Pennsylvania; married (1) Susanna 1715; born Unknown; died Unknown; married (2) Rebecca Davis March 21, 1730/31; born Unknown; died Unknown.
  v.   Elijah Doan, born April 03, 1694 in Cape Cod, Massachusetts; died September 21, 1736 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; married Catherine 1725; born Unknown; died Unknown.
  vi.   Isreal Doan, born March 20, 1698/99 in Middletown MM, Bucks Co, Pennsylvania; died Unknown.
  vii.   Elizabeth Doan, born August 20, 1701 in Middletown MM, Bucks Co, Pennsylvania; died 1728; married George Randall August 10, 1722 in Middletown MM, Bucks Co, Pennsylvania; born Unknown; died Unknown.
  viii.   Rebecca Doan, born 1702 in Middletown MM, Bucks Co, Pennsylvania; died Unknown; married Joseph Randall August 10, 1722 in Middletown MM, Bucks Co, Pennsylvania; born Unknown in Middletown MM, Bucks Co, Pennsylvania; died Unknown.


      2762. John Carter, born Abt. 1675 in England; died March 20, 1709/10 in Bucks Co. Pennsylvania. He was the son of 5524. Robert Carter. He married 2763. Grace White February 04, 1701/02 in Bucks Co., Pennsylvsania.

      2763. Grace White, born 1680; died Unknown. She was the daughter of 5526. John White and 5527. Mary Paxton.

Notes for John Carter:
From a transcript of the book Carter Cousins, More Descendants of James Carter and Susannah Griffith, Vol 2. Pages 96-98; Compiled by Marie Thompson Eberle and Margaret Ship Henley; pp96-98, sent to me by Gar Watson (garwatson@islands.vi):

****** C4. John Carter b. c1675 Eng. d. Bucks Co. PA 20 Mar 1709/10, m. c4d 12m 1702, (intent Middletown MM) Bucks Co., Grace White d/o John and Mary, who m. 2nd, 3d 5m 1723, Falls MM, William Carver. Their children from both John & Grace's probate files in Philapelphia Co. (Mary's birth listed in Middletown MM record):

C46. Robert Carter b. c1703 Bucks Co., PA; Middletown Men's Minutes reported married out of unity with a woman who is not of our Society, 6d 7m 1733.
C47. Mary Carter b. 10d 1m 1704 Bucks Co. (Middletown MM) d. 7 Nov 1744 Orange Co., NC (from Elmer Ross Carter, Passadena, TX) m. Middletown MM, Bucks Co., 14d 10m 1726. Joseph Doane b. 22d 2m 1697, Bucks Co., s/o Daniel and Mehitable (Twining).
C48. William Carter b. c1706 d. betw. 1710 & 1737 (named in John's will 1710, not named with other children by Grace's will in 1737).
C49. Martha Carter b. c1708, m. c1730, John Beale (marriage not found but children's births recorded in Buckingham MM"

==============

From WFT #1670:

John Carter's will is recorded in Philadelphia. It refers to him as a yeoman and mentions his wife Grace and his children. William Carter (the mayor of Philadelphia) is referred to as a kinsman. The will was proved on May 17, 1710.
     
Children of John Carter and Grace White are:
  1381 i.   Mary Carter, born March 10, 1703/04 in Middletown, Bucks Co, Pennsylvania; died November 07, 1744 in Cane Creek, Orange Co., North Carolina; married Joseph Doan October 14, 1726 in Middletown MM, Bucks Co, Pennsylvania.
  ii.   Robert Carter, born Abt. 1703 in Bucks Co. Pennsylvania; died Unknown.
  Notes for Robert Carter:
From a transcript of the book Carter Cousins, More Descendants of James Carter and Susannah Griffith, Vol 2. Pages 96-98; Compiled by Marie Thompson Eberle and Margaret Ship Henley; pp96-98, sent to me by Gar Watson (garwatson@islands.vi):

C46. Robert Carter b. c1703 Bucks Co., PA; Middletown Men's Minutes reported married out of unity with a woman who is not of our Society, 6d 7m 1733.


  iii.   William Carter, born Abt. 1706; died Bet. 1710 - 1737.
  Notes for William Carter:
From a transcript of the book Carter Cousins, More Descendants of James Carter and Susannah Griffith, Vol 2. Pages 96-98; Compiled by Marie Thompson Eberle and Margaret Ship Henley; pp96-98, sent to me by Gar Watson (garwatson@islands.vi):

C48. William Carter b. c1706 d. betw. 1710 & 1737 (named in John's will 1710, not named with other children by Grace's will in 1737).


  iv.   Martha Carter, born Abt. 1708; died Unknown; married John Beale Abt. 1730; died Unknown.
  Notes for Martha Carter:
From a transcript of the book Carter Cousins, More Descendants of James Carter and Susannah Griffith, Vol 2. Pages 96-98; Compiled by Marie Thompson Eberle and Margaret Ship Henley; pp96-98, sent to me by Gar Watson (garwatson@islands.vi):

C49. Martha Carter b. c1708, m. c1730, John Beale (marriage not found but children's births recorded in Buckingham MM"



      2880. Johann Mathias Steffes, born Abt. 1655 in Alfen, Kreis Cochem Rheinpfalz, Germany; died August 03, 1724 in Laubach, Kreis Masburg Rheinfalz, Germany. He married 2881. Maria Abt. 1680.

      2881. Maria, born in Alfen, Kreis Cochem Rheinpfalz, Germany; died Unknown in Alfen, Kreis Masburg Rheinpfalz, Germany.

Notes for Johann Mathias Steffes:
From the book "Glimpses... Steffes' Past and Present, 1655-1995," put together by Carol M. Froode and Andrew M. Chiello:

"GLIMPSES..."

"The beginnings of our family are clouded due to obscure and incomplete record keeping in Germany's Rheinpfalz area. We calculated Johann Mathias Steffes' date of birth by subtracting his age from the date of his burial notation in the church records at Masburg, Germany. There are many other Steffes families in the area, but there are not enough records to link them to one common ancestor.

The Rheinpfalz area of Germany is known as a LANDER, or as we would call it, a state. Rheinpfalz was independent at the time of Johann Mathias' birth. There was no Prussia or Germany as we know today. Each Lander had its own ruling family and dignitaries. The area was predominately Catholic, with the church of Rome having great influence. Rheinpfalz is not far from the borders of France and Belgium.

The primary occupations of the Rheinpfalz area were farming and wine-making, with tailors, day workers and blacksmiths representing the various trades. The church wielded much power, and was the hub of society in the 17th century. Most of the teaching was done by priests and nuns for they were the only ones with any form of formal education, whereas much of the population was illiterate.

In the year 1655, the estimated time of Johann Mathias' birth, the world was in a state of upheaval. The bubonic plague, which claimed about 150,000 lives in England alone, occurred during the years 1630-1680. It spread across Europe quickly, and when armies invaded the Rheinpfalz in 1645 to claim land for England they brought with them the "Black Death", as this plague was called. Mathias' survival must have been a gift from God. Entire families were decimated and, since reliable records were available only after 1713, it is difficult to establish an exact connection with other Steffes families who survived, or were claimed by the "Black Death". it took a remarkable amount of energy, sagacity and bravery to face the many trials these people encountered, but face them they did.

Sketchy records indicate that Johann Mathias' father was born around 1625, at the beginning of the Religious Reformation. This movement caused families, friends, rulers and peasants to become instant enemies over their beliefs. These bitter feelings culminated in the Thirty Years War (1618-1648). By the year 1680 half of Germany's population had died, either by the sword or the plague.

The diocese of Masburg, which included Muellenbach and Laubach, was not immune to war or disease. Few records survive from this era, but it has been documented that as many as thirty people were interred in one day, in a mass grave. Many victims, their identity unknown, were never recorded.

Germany prospered for almost 150 years after the plague before any major world events affected their lives again. The system that governed life in the late 1600's was feudal in nature and most individuals were serfs, working for wealthy land owners. Though no records survive as proof, it is surmised that the Masburg area was under the dominion of the House of von juelich (possibly now known as Guelig) or the Baron of Cochem, a direct relative of von juelich. This region was home to many Steffes families.

Existing records show that these families were primarily farmers, renting their land from the wealthy lords and barons. Unlike slaves in the southern United States, these serfs were able to work their land and sell the harvest. Heavy taxes, however, made it impossible to prosper, and three days out of seven had to be dedicated to working the landlord's property. Any request had to be obeyed, and many times the family was left to farm the property while the head of the household was forced to do the owner's bidding. Large families were the norm in order to have enough "hands" to work the land and tend the crops. This type of serfdom also contributed to the migration of people from area to area. A kind and generous landlord had his subjects content to stay for generations. The tyrannical and unjust lord or baron had to contend with the constant departure of his people, resulting in many leaving the region of their birth. ...."
     
Child of Johann Steffes and Maria is:
  1440 i.   Johann Steffes, born Abt. 1687 in Alfen, Kreis Cochem Rheinpfalz, Germany; died May 31, 1743 in Laubach, Kreis Cochem Rheinpfalz, Germany; married (1) Maria Magdelena Marx November 11, 1718 in Alfen, Germany; married (2) Eva Maria Schmitz May 22, 1731 in Masburg, Germany.


      2884. Simon Tholl, died Unknown.
     
Children of Simon Tholl are:
  1445 i.   Elizabeth Tholl, born Abt. 1699 in Masburg, Germany; died March 20, 1740/41 in Laubach, Germany; married Peter Klee February 03, 1721/22.
  1442 ii.   Reinhard Tholl, born Abt. 1701 in Masburg, Germany; died March 19, 1765 in Laubach, Germany; married Anna Barbara Wagner February 03, 1721/22.


      3328. Richard Singletary, born Abt. 1599 in England; died October 25, 1687 in Haverhill, Essex Co., Massachusetts. He married 3329. Susannah Cook.

      3329. Susannah Cook, born Abt. 1616 in England; died April 11, 1682 in Haverhill, Essex Co., Massachusetts.

Notes for Richard Singletary:
There actual origins of Richard Singletary are unknown, but it seems almost certain that he was born in England, and that at some point he immigrated to America, settling in the Massachusetts Bay Colony around 1637. There seems to be a lot of information, and apparently misinformation, about Richard and his descendants.

I have been contacted by David Lee Dunham of Tulsa, Oklahoma (DelcyD@aol.com), who seems to have the most comprehensive information that I have found on this family. David has published a book about this line titled, "Descendants of Richard Singletary 1599-1687 and his son Jonathan Dunham 1639-1724." As to the information that he has for Richard Singletary, David cites several sources. Most of it came from an old book, "Genealogy of the Singletary-Curtis Family," by Lou Singletary-Bedford, published in New York in 1907. David also said that he got some additional information from, "Old Families of Salisbury and Amesbury, Ma.," Vol. I, by David Hoyt, Providence, Rhode Island, 1897; and the "Singletary Genealogy" from the W. H. Elange manuscript Genealogy Collection, New England Historic Genealogical Society Library.

There is an interesting story about the origins of Richard Singletary, which has apparently been circulating around the family from many years. I heard it from more than one researcher, and it was apparently related in the Lou Singletary book from 1907. The story relates that in the last quarter of the sixteenth century there was a family in England by the name of Dunham, which had large estates and titles. The family apparently had two branches, and all but one young male heir of the older branch had died. That young heir was reportedly Richard Dunham. It was apparently set up that if the last male heir of the older branch died, all the property and title of the branch would pass to the younger branch, the family of Sir Graham Phillips. One morning it was discovered that young Richard had disappeared, along with his nurse. Neither of them were ever found and the estates and title eventually passed to the Phillip's branch. Reportedly, the "Dunham Castle" in England, is controlled by the Phillips family to this day.

Many years later, the child's nurse reportedly made an affidavit on her death bed. She reported that she had been employed to kill the young child, but she was unable to do so. She stated that she hid the child and took him to a ship named the "Good Ship Charles," whose Captain was Bentony Eaton. She said that they sailed on the ship to America, where she left the boy in the care of Captain Eaton. She stated that she returned to England, but before she left she gave the boy the name "Singletarry," because she left him to tarry by himself in the world. Apparently someone tried to verify the nurses story and although they found something to indicate that it might be Richard, they did not find enough evidence to legally prove it.

There would seem to be problems with the dating of this story. If Richard was really born around 1599, then he would have been about 11 years old when the first colony at Jamestown was founded. Even if these dates are off, there wasn't much civilization anywhere in America until he would have been 20-30 years old. There could be other explanations for these problems, which most likely will never be verified. It is known that around 1665, Richard's son Jonathan, began to call himself Jonathan Dunham, alias Singletary. It is not really known why he did this, but it is possible that it had something to do with this story about his father. There is apparently another story that Richard immigrated to America as an adult, which seems much more likely. There is no known record of a Richard Singletary on any passenger list throughout any of this time period, but these records are not at all complete.

What is known about Richard is that there is a record that he was admitted as an inhabitant at Salem, Massachusetts on September 11, 1637. The next year he apparently moved to Newbury, where there is a record that he became a Freeman on September 7, 1638. Apparently he as well as others, moved westward into unsettled areas along the Merrimack River, where he was reportedly listed as a Proprietor at Salisbury in 1645 and again in 1650. He was reportedly a planter there and received land in the "First Division." By 1652 he was reportedly in Haverhill, listed as a Proprietor, and he was listed as a Selectman there in 1655. On January 20, 1653, he received a division of land in Haverhill.

David Dunham gives definitions for some of these terms. He says that a Freeman had to be admitted to live in a town in early 17th Century Massachusetts, and that he had to be a member of the church and to own 40 pounds worth of property. A Freeman was allowed to vote. A Selectman was elected by the townspeople to attend the Legislative Council, and that there were usually three of them in a town. Proprietors were men who were assigned land for settling. They were apparently responsible for the hiring of a minister, starting schools, organizing and supervising a militia, and admitting new inhabitants. It is apparent that Richard must have been a fairly prominent citizen of this area. David notes that in this time period, the governments in this area were linked to the church, and that the church was very strict.

David reports that Richard married Susannah Cooke around 1639. There was apparently a record of a "Goodwife Singletary," who died about 1638-39 in Newbury, but there is no information to connect this person to Richard in any way. David states that the only thing that is known about Susannah is that she was a sister to a Phillip Cooke of Cambridge, who died in 1666 and left a 3 year old son named John in Susannah's care. Richard and Susannah's first son Jonathan was reportedly born in Salisbury on January 17, 1639/40. David lists a number of other children for Richard and Susannah. Jonathan, who moved to New Jersey, was the only one to change his name to Dunham. David reports that son Nathaniel was killed by Indians in Haverhill in 1689. Reportedly son Amos lived and died in Haverhill, and youngest son Benjamin emigrated to South Carolina before 1696. David also lists a daughter Eunice Singletary, who also lived and died in Haverhill. Also another daughter named Lydia Singletary, who married Danile Ladd and also remained in Haverhill.

There are apparently other records of Richard and Susannah. I found an index record of some depositions given by both Richard and Susannah in court in Essex County. One given by Richard Singletary in 1662 (Vol. 3, page 7), gives Richard's age as 63. This is apparently the source of Richard's given date of birth. There is also a deposition from 1662 for Susanna Singletary (also Vol. 3, page 7), listing her age as 46. This apparently is the source of her date of birth also. The index also lists two other depositions given by Richard Singletary, which seem to show two other dates of birth. One from 1663 (Vol. 3, page 27), lists his age as 70. The other from 1664 (Vol. 3, page 214), lists his age as 72. These records seem to indicate that Richard's date of birth is not real firm.

Richard and Susannah apparently spent the rest of their lives in Haverhill, Essex County, Massachusetts. David Dunham and other sources report that Susannah died there on April 11, 1682, and that Richard died there on October 25, 1687.

     
Children of Richard Singletary and Susannah Cook are:
  1664 i.   Jonathan Dunham, born January 17, 1639/40 in Salisbury, Essex Co., Massachusetts; died 1723 in Woodbridge, Middlesex Co., New Jersey; married Mary Bloomfield Bef. 1662 in Essex Co., Massachusetts.
  ii.   Eunice Dunham, born January 07, 1641/42 in Salisbury, Essex Co., Massachusetts; died October 05, 1715 in Haverhill, Essex Co., Massachusetts.
  iii.   Nathaniel Dunham, born August 28, 1644 in Haverhill, Essex Co., Massachusetts; died August 13, 1689 in Haverhill, Essex Co., Massachusetts.
  iv.   Lydia Dunham, born April 30, 1648 in Salisbury, Essex Co., Massachuesetts; died Aft. 1679 in Haverhill, Essex Co., Massachusetts; married Daniel Ladd, Jr. November 24, 1668 in Haverhill, Essex Co., Massachusetts; born July 26, 1642 in Salisbury, Essex Co., Massachuesetts; died August 04, 1728 in Haverhill, Essex Co., Massachusetts.
  v.   Amos Dunham, born April 04, 1651 in Salisbury, Essex Co., Massachuesetts; died November 01, 1724 in Haverhill, Essex Co., Massachusetts; married Sarah Currier Rogers; born 1665 in Bradford, Essex Co., Massachusetts; died Unknown.
  vi.   Benjamin Dunham, born April 04, 1656 in Haverhill, Essex Co., Massachusetts; died July 1699 in Red Bank, South Carolina.


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