[ Home Page | First Page | Previous Page | Next Page | Last Page ]

Descendants of John Waggener

Generation No. 2


2. HERBERT2 WAGGENER (JOHN1) was born Bet. 1680 - 1685 in Essex Co., Virginia, and died Abt. August 1743 in Essex Co., Virginia. He married ELIZABETH Abt. 1702. She was born Abt. 1685, and died Bet. 1743 - 1749.

Notes for H
ERBERT WAGGENER:
From the various records, it appears that Herbert was probably the 6th or 7th oldest children, of the 8 known children born to his parents John and Rachel Waggener. I have estimated that he must have been born between 1680 and 1685. Herbert Waggener must have been born on his parent's plantation in South Farnham Parish in Essex County, Virginia (Old Rappahannock County). The plantation was apparently near the north side of Hoskins Creek, which flows almost due east into the Rappahannock River, near the town of Tappahannock. Herbert and his wife Elizabeth seem to have resided in South Farnham Parish their entire lives. I am pretty sure that their plantation was not too far from the plantation of his parents. The deed below from 1743 gives a pretty good description of it's location. Herbert is listed on the Quit Rent Roll of 1715 in Essex County, as paying taxes on 200 acres of land.

Herbert's will, dated August 2, 1743 and proved on September 20, 1743, is on record in Essex County, Virginia Archives. Apparently he died at that time. Their plantation passed to his son John, who moved to Spotsylvania County in the later 1740's, and then to Culpeper County in about the 1760's. Possibly John remained in Essex until his mother Elizabeth also died. John apparently sold the plantation in 1771.

===============

****** A deed from Essex County dated March 6, 1714/15, lists "Herbert Wagoner" as a witness. The deed involves the sale of 100 acres to Erasmus Allen (apparently the husband of Herbert's sister Dinah). It is also witness by John Allen, who is probably Erasmus' son. The property is described as adjacent to the land of James Taylor, which was apparently adjacent to the property of Herbert's parents.

===============

This deed is interesting for a number of reasons. It lists Herbert as a witness, with Anthony North, who was described as a neighbor of Herbert's father John Waggener, on earlier records. Also, the location of the property seems to be very close to the location of the property of Herbert's parents, and most likely close to Herbert's property.

****** From Essex County, Virginia, Deeds and Will Book #15, 1716-1718, pages 248-51: In a deed dated November 24-25 1718, "Thomas Wheeler of Southfarnam Parish" leases to "Joseph Baker of same," "175 acres, part of 600 acres granted by patent 22 Oct. 1663 unto Mr. John Gregory of parish aforesaid, deceased...trees that formerly divided this land and the land of Wm. Stone... along the antient line of John Gatewood, deceased, till it meets with a small creek the same being a branch of Hoskinses Creek... the main creek called Hoskinses Creek..."
"Wit. John Fargeson, Anthony North, Herbert Waggener. 16 Dec. 1718..."

==============

This deed is also witnessed by Herbert and the same Anthony North. It also lists some of the same names from the deed above, indicating the property and people were also from the area Herbert's parents lived and apparently Herbert also lived.

****** From Essex County, Virginia, Deeds and Will Book #15, 1716-1718, pages 251-253: In a deed dated November 24-25, 1718, "Richard Grigory of Southpharnum Parish, Essex County," leases "to Thomas Wheeler of same" ... "300 acres... along the main swamp... signigyed in a platt tested by George Morris, a surveyor, and dated 1 10br 1668, part of a patent of 1030 acres.."
"Wit. John Fargeson, Anthony North, Herbert Waggener. 16 Dec. 1718..."

=============

This deed which I have taken excerpts from involves Samuel Waggener Jr. selling some of the land that he had inherited from his deceased father Samuel Sr., brother to Herbert. Some of this land was originally bequeathed to Samuel from his and Herbert's older brother John. From other records it must be close to the Upper Church of the Southfarnham Parish, the land of which was donated by Samuel Sr. This record seems to give a detailed description of the location of Herbert and Samuel's land. It confirms that the land was close to the plantation of their parents John and Rachel Waggener, west and somewhat north of the town of Tappahanock. This also seems to list the names of what must have been many of the neighbors and friends of all the Waggeners in Essex County.

****** From Deed Abstracts of Essex County, Virginia, Ancient Press, 59-60. (pp166-169); from Walter S. Waggoner:

"2 Feb. 1743 THIS INDENTURE made this twentieth day of February in the year of our Lord Christ one thousand seven hundred and forty three Between SAMUEL WAGGENER of Essex County in SOUTHFARNHAM Parish of the Colony of Virginia of the one part, and HENRY PURKINS of the aforesaid County and Parish...
... a certain parcell of Land being in the County and Parish aforesaid, containing One hundred and Seventy acres more or less, with Plantation, the GRAVE YARD in the Orchard where the said SAMUEL WAGGENERs Father and Mother was buried only excepted, which said land is bounded, beginning at a corner Hickory between HERBERT WAGGENORs Land and the land of ROBT. SP. COLEMAN's, that formerly belonged to one TAYLOR, and ZACHARIAH ALLEN's Land, that THOMAS MEADOR and WILLIAM ALLEN bought of RACHEL JORDEN, and from thence down HOBBS HOLE ROAD binding on the line of the said ZACHARIAH ALLEN till it comes to the Great red Oake in the Old Field at the CROSS ROADS, and binding from thence along the line of THOMAS MEADOR to DAVID FALCONERs Land, then binding the said FAULCONERs line till it comes to HENRY REEVES Land, that was formerly HOPE MEADOR's..."

==============

From Fran and Sam Waggener:

WILL OF HERBERT WAGGENER, ESSEX CO., VA.., AUG. 2, 1743

In the name of God Amen I Herbert Waggener of the County of Essex in Southfarnham Parish being very weak in body but in perfect sense and memory do make and ordain that my present last will and testament in manner and Form Following Imprimis. I commend my Soul to almighty God and my Body to the Earth to be Decently Buried and as to the Disposing of my Temporal Estate which it hath pleased God to bestow upon me do I give and Dispose thereof as follows.

Viz Item I tend unto my Beloved wife my land and Plantation, and All my Negroes with their Increase and all my personal Estate Goods Chattles Whatsoever, During her Natural Life and after her Decease all my land and Plantation do I give and Bequeath unto my Eldest Son John Waggener to him and his heirs forever. I do give also to my son John one Shift Sterling in full of his portion of my Estate, both Rail and Personal.

Item, and after my beloved wife Elizabeth's Decease, all my Negroes and their Increase, and all my personal Estate, Goods, Chattles whatsoever, I do Give to be equally divided among all my Children whose particular Names I shall have Mention Viz Ann Greenhill, Mary Evans, wife of John Evans, James Herbert, Elizabeth, Thomas, Sophia, Greensbe, Reuben and Edmond Waggener. Only Ann Greenhill and Mary Evans, Allowing Four pounds Each out of their Parts, for which they have already In a Feather Bed Received.

-- And further my Will and Desire is that all my Youngest Children shall be brought up out of my estate and to have Sufficient Education by my Executors.

And I do Constitute and Ordain my beloved Wife Elizabeth, and my son John Waggener Executors fully and Solely of this my present Last Will and Testament, --and I do hereby Revoake, Disanul, and make Void all former Wills and Testaments by me herefore made, and this Only and no other To be taken for my Last Will and Testament, in Testimony Whereof I have hereunto Set my hand and Effected my Seal this second day of August in the year of our Lord 1743.


Signed Sealed and Herbert Waggener Seale
delivered in the
presence of

Benj. Waggener,
John Allen, Junior



The following copied from THE VIRGINIA GENEALOGIST- ESSEX COUNTY
Herbert Waggoner's Will Presented 20 Sept 1743 by Elizabeth Waggener
Proved by Benjamin Waggener and John Allen junr.

Pages 37-39, Bond of Eliza. Waggener as executrix of Harbert Waggener. 20 Sept 1743 For L500 Sterling. Securities, Erasmus Withers Allen and George Coleman Elizabeth Waggener
      Erasmus W. Allen
      George Coleman
20 Sept 1743. Acknowledged

Pages 49-53. Herbert Waggener. Inventory. Made in obedience to order of xx7br(Sept.) 1743. Appraiser sworn before Captn. Wm. Roane, Gent. No total valuation.

Notes for E
LIZABETH:
When I began researching the family tree in the mid-1990's, I was in contact with two researchers, Janet Waggener Bravo and Liz Stump, who had both listed Elizabeth's full name as Elizabeth Jayne Garnett. Both of them claimed to have some kind of documented "proof" of this, but when I asked them for their proof, neither were able to locate it in the papers that they had gathered. Both of them were rather elderly by the time I contacted them. Both of them seem to have done a significant amount of genealogical research for many years, but most of this research was done before the use of personal computers. Both indicated that they amassed a significant amount of paperwork. I have since lost touch with them and I can only assume that they became unable to continue any research.

Lawrence "Bud" Waggener, Jr. also listed Elizabeth's surname as Garnett in his book "The Waggener Trace." When I contacted him about this, he indicated that he got this information from the research of Max Edward Waggener, and that he had no documentation himself. I was never able to contact Max, so I don't know if he had some independent documentation or information, or if he had obtained this from either Janet or Liz.

For a number of years I listed Elizabeth's name as Elizabeth Jayne Garnett, in deference to the reputations of these three researchers. I have myself looked for some records to support this and have been unable to find anything. Admittedly I believe that my search has been less than complete and that there are more records in either Essex or Gloucester Counties in Virginia, that I have yet to locate and search. I have decided that until I should find some actual proof that Elizabeth was a Garnett, it is more appropriate to list her without a known surname.

=================

There was of course a Garnett family in the area at the time, the family of John Garnett (b. unknown d. Bet. 1704-1709). John was listed as living in Kingston Parrish of Gloucester County, Virginia, when in 1692, he purchased 600 acres in Essex County. The intent of this seems to have been to divide this land into four equal portions of 150 acres, and to pass one portion on to each of four apparent offspring. Three of these offspring were males and their names were listed in records as Thomas, John and Anthony. The name of the apparently fourth offspring does not show up in records, presumably because she was a daughter. Presumably she subsequently married and changed her name. The records further indicate that John's son Anthony died young and that his portion of 150 acres was subsequently divided up into three portions of 50 acres and then given to the three remaining offspring.

The "theory," if you want to call it that, seems to be that this Elizabeth was that apparently unknown daughter of John Garnett. There is some other circumstantial evidence to support this. The apparent age of Elizabeth seems to be about right, although she probably would have been the youngest child of John Garnett. Further, she and Herbert Waggener lived their entire lives in South Farnham Parish in Essex County, near to the Garnett families. Interestingly enough, Herbert is listed on the Quit Rent Rolls (Taxes) for 1715 in Essex County with 200 acres. This would be the same amount of property that the daughter of John Garnett would have received from her father (150 acres + 50 acres).

The Waggener and Garnett families are definitely connected about 75-85 years later in Culpeper County, when three sons of James Herbert Waggener married three daughters of Robert "Robin" Garnett. One of these couples are my ancestors, James Jones Waggener and his wife Elizabeth Garnett. I also located a record from Spotsylvania County dated 1749, in which Herbert and Elizabeth's son John Waggener was listed as a witness for a deed involving Anthony Garnett, son of John Garnett's son John Garnett, Jr. This supports the fact that the Waggener and Garnett families were in some kind of contact, between the early 1700's in Essex County, and the 1780's, when they intermarried in Culpeper County.
     
Children of H
ERBERT WAGGENER and ELIZABETH are:
7. i.   JAMES HERBERT3 WAGGENER, b. Abt. 1720, Essex Co., Virginia; d. Abt. 1803, Culpeper Co., Virginia.
  ii.   SOPHIA WAGGENER, b. Unknown, Essex Co., Virginia; d. Aft. 1767.
  Notes for SOPHIA WAGGENER:
From the Essex Co. Clerk of the Court Deeds, Book 30:

****** April 20, 1767- Sophia Waggener purchased sixty-three acres in South Farnham Parish, Essex County, from Archibald and Marie Richie for Twenty-seven pounds, five shillings. (pg. 137-8)

****** November 7, 1767- A Deed of Gift: Sophia Waggener "for the love, good service and affection which I have and do bear towards my loving son Thomas Coleman" give and grant the sixty-three acres she purchased from Capt. Richie. If Thomas dies without issue, the land reverts to Sophia, and she is not to be forbidden from living on the land during her natural life. Witnessed by Nathan Waggener, Thomas Armstrong and George Coleman. Signed and Sealed Sophia Waggener.

(Thomas was the son of Lucrectia Waggener and Edward Coleman, Jr. It appears likely that Lucrectia, who would be Sophia's 1st cousin, died shortly after the birth of Thomas, and that Sophia raised him as her son. I have Thomas' birth date as Abt. 1750, which means he would have been about 16-17 years old at the time of this gift. Nathan Waggener is probably the son of Benjamin Waggener and Martha Greenhill, and would have also been a 1st cousin to Sophia and Lucrectia.)

=================

****** Spotsylvania County Records, Deed Book F-1761-1766. John Waggoner of St. Geo. Par., Spts. Co., to Robert Bradley of same Par. and Co. L30 curr. 300 a., remainder of a tract taken up by George Dowdy, etc. Andrew Waggoner, Ann x Waggoner, Sophia Waggoner. Dec. 7, 1761.

8. iii.   JOHN WAGGENER, b. Abt. 1702, Essex Co., Virginia; d. Aft. 1771, Culpeper Co., Virginia.
  iv.   ANNE WAGGENER, b. Abt. 1704, Essex Co., Virginia; d. Unknown; m. WILLIAM GREENHILL; b. Abt. 1700; d. Unknown.
  v.   MARY WAGGENER, b. Abt. 1706, Essex Co., Virginia; d. Unknown; m. JOHN EVANS, 1743; b. Abt. 1700; d. Unknown.
  Notes for MARY WAGGENER:
From Index to Marriages of Old Rappahannock and Essex Counties, Virginia, 1655-1900; by Wilkerson, Eva Eubank; Richmond, VA: Clearfield Company, 1953:

****** 1743, Waggener, Mary, daughter of Herbert, married John Evans; Book W-7, page 36

9. vi.   ELIZABETH WAGGENER, b. Abt. 1720, Essex Co., Virginia; d. Abt. 1798.
  vii.   THOMAS WAGGENER, b. Unknown, Essex Co., Virginia; d. Bef. 1771.
  Notes for THOMAS WAGGENER:
Thomas Waggener would have been born on the estate of his parents in Essex County, probably before 1720. He was apparently a career soldier, serving with at least a couple of the Virginia Colony Regiments. The first records show him as a Sergeant serving under Captain Beverly Robinson in his expedition against Canada in 1746 and 1747. This would seem to indicate that he had some kind of military experience prior to this. He next shows up on records as a Lieutenant with the Virginia Regiment in the spring of 1754. He served with George Washington in the apparent construction of and maintenance of Ft. Necessity in 1754. His younger brother Edmund also served there as a Sergeant. Thomas was promoted to Captain in the summer of 1754. He fought with Washington in the Battle of Great Meadows (also known as Braddock's Defeat) on July 9, 1755. He was apparently wounded in this battle, and his brother Edmund was killed.

Thomas is listed on numerous records from 1756 through 1758. In 1756, under orders of Colonel Washington, he with a Company of 60 men, reportedly built and garrisoned two forts on Patterson's Creek. That same year he was also at the two forts at Fort Holland on the South Branch of the Potomac River near Cumberland, Maryland. He also is listed in 1756 at Monongahela, and he signed a petition at Cumberland. In 1757 He again shows up on records at Fort Holland and Fort Loundoun. In 1758 he is described in one record as being in command at Fort Pitt, and in other records as being at Fort Geroge and Fort Hopewell. Presumably, as a Captain, he was in command at many of these locations that he was serving at throughout this time period.

It is not at all clear what happened to Thomas after 1758. I have not found any records of him from 1758 until 1771. The indenture dated 1771 shows that he is clearly deceased at that point, but there is no indication of when or how he died. It has been reported that he lived to and fought in the Revolutionary War, but this seems very unlikely. There is no record of Thomas being married or having any offspring, and the 1771 indenture would seem to show that he apparently did not.

====================================

From "Waggoner Family 1670 to 1970" by Earl Wagner, 1970:

Captain Thomas Waggoner- First Virginia Volunteer Regiment

Captain Thomas Waggoner was a son of Herbert and Elizabeth Waggener of Southfarnham Parish, Essex County, Virginia. Captain Thomas Waggener served as Company Commander in the First Virginia Volunteer Regiment under Colonel George Washington during the French and Indian War 1754-1757. He was commissioned Lieutenant February 26, 1754 and promoted to Captain August 16, 1755. He was a veteran of Old Fort Necessity in 1754 and was at the Battle of Great Meadows, Pennsylvania, (Braddock's Defeat by the French and Indians) July 9, 1755; and was at Fort Holland on the South Branch of the Potomac River, North West of Winchester, where the Virginians built two Forts in 1756. Earlier in the same year Captain Waggoner with a Company of 60 men was ordered by Colonel Washington to build and garrison two additional Forts on Patterson's Creek.

Earl goes on to describe some limited service that Thomas served during the Revolutionary War, which I believe to be in error, due to the fact that he apparently died before 1771.

From a section titled: "Virginia Troops in French and Indian Wars List of Officers of the Virginia Regiment, 29 May, 1754, and the Dates of their Commissions

****** ... Lieutenant Thomas Wagener, February 26, 1754. ....

A list of Officers and the Dates of their Commissions
                 
***** .... Captain Waggener, August 16, 1755 ...

The foregoing contains a list of all the Soldiers which are to be found either upon the Pay Rolls, or Muster Rolls. The party of Recruits which join at Wills Creek after the Battle of the Meadows- the Men who received the present of a Pistole from the Country as an acknowledgement of their Gallant Behavior upon that occasion- and the detachment which marched to Augusta sometime after the Defeat. By which (there appearing to be 350 upon the Roll) it is evident there are many men (here) Including that are not entitled (strictly) to a share of the 200,000 acres of Land under Gov' Dinwiddles Proclaim, and scarce possible that any can be omitted which are- this being carefully attended to least any might be deprived of their Right by not appearing on the list when they applied to
April 30, 1771.                   G. Washington"

==================================

***** From the Roster of Virginia Militia listed at the Fort Necessity National Battlefield, sent to me courtesy of F.E. "Gene" Waggoner;

The roster lists "The names of soldiers serving under George Washington during the Fort Necessity Campaign. It is a compilation of two sources described below. Spelling of names are as they appear on the separate rosters.
-Title of paper roster: A listing of the Officers, Non commissioned Officers, and Privates serving with G. W. at the Battle of Great Meadows at Fort Necessity in the Summer of 1754.
-Title of the framed pay and muster rolls: A Roll of the Officers and Soldiers in the Service of the Colony Before the Battle of the Meadows the 3rd of July, 1754 as Taken From the Pay and Muster Rolls of These Times.
Officers

****** ... Thomas Waggoner, Captain (from the paper roster)...

****** ... Thomas Wagener, Lieutenant (from the framed pay and muster rolls)..."

(Thomas' brother is listed from both sources as "Edward Wagener, Sergeant.")

===================================

From "They Went Thataway" by Charles Hughes Hamlin (1964, 65, 66):

The roster of the "Company of Captain Thomas Waggener at Fort Holland, on ye South Branch." is listed without date. There are 89 names on the roster. Mr. Hamlin reports that he was unable to locate any reference to Fort Holland, but that the South Branch is of the Potomac River, Northwest of Winchester and according to Douglas Southall Freeman, the Virginians built two forts thereon in about 1756. Mr. Hamlin also describes Captain Thomas as being a veteran of Ft. Necessity in 1754 and was at the Battle of Great Meadows (Braddock's Defeat on July 9, 1755)

===================================

From "Virginia Colonial Soldiers" by Lloyd DeWitt Bockstruck, Copyright 1988, 3rd Printing 1998:

The following listings of Thomas are in the chapter labeled:
"King George's War 1739-1748"
"The following are the muster rolls of the company of foot of Captain Beverly Robinson raised in the colony of Virginia in 1746 an expedition against Canada. The company was part of a larger force under the command of George Clinton, Captain General and Commander in Chief of the Province of New York. Lieutenant Joseph Harmer was was left sick at New York and Ensign John Sloss was not returned. The original records are in the Public Record Office, London, CO5/1338."

****** "Returns for 14 June 1746- 24 August 1746. .....Thomas Waggoner, Sgt., 25 June: ....." (p. 39)

****** "Returns for 25 August 1746- 24 October 1746. .... Thomas Wagganer, Sgt. ..." (p.40)

****** "Returns for 25 October 1746- 24 December 1746. ... Thomas Wagganer, Sgt. ..." (p. 40)

****** "Returns for 25 December 1746- 23 February 1747. ... Thomas Wagganer, Sgt.; ..." (p.41)

****** "Returns for 24 February 1747- 24 April 1747. ... Thomas Wagganer, Sgt. ..." (p.41)

****** "Returns for 25 June 1747- 24 August 1747. .... Thomas Waggoner, Sgt. .... " (p. 42)

****** "Returns for 25 August 1747- 24 October 1747. ..... Thomas Waggoner, Sgt. ..." (p. 42)

The following listings are in the next chapter labeled:
"French and Indian War 1754-1763"
"Anglo-French rivalry in North America erupted in November 1753 when Governor Robert Dinwiddle of Virginia sent George Washington to Fort LeBoeuf to warn the French that they were encroaching on territory claimed by Virginia. Governor Dinwiddle ordered Washington to select a suitable site for a fort to counter the French advance. Construction in the vicinity of present day Pittsburgh began in 1754, and the conflict was joined. The French were overwhelmingly victorious, and Washington capitulated at Great Meadows. He returned to Virginia in disgrace.
With humiliation in 1753 and defeat in 1754, Washington with some 600 Virginians guided Gen. Edward Braddock with 800 regulars to the Ohio River Valley. At Fort Dusquesne the French and their Indian allies surprised the English and badly defeated them. The long, fierce struggle was underway.
In 1755 Washington was placed in command of the Virginia Regiment. The year 1756 almost drove him to despair, and he retired from his command in 1757. In 1758 the Virginia regulars were divided into two regiments, one under the command of Col. William Byrd and the other under Col. George Washington. The latter was sometimes called the First Virginia Regiment, and the former, the Second Virginia Regiment. Virginia forces were quite active in 1758 and participated in Forbes's Expedition in taking Fort Dusquesne. Afterwards Washington resigned his commission and returned home. .....
These papers of George Washington contain the bulk of the entries for the service cited in this chapter. The originals are at the Library of Congress and microfilm copies are widely available."

****** "Pay of the Virginia Regiment from 29 May until 29 July 1754. ..... Thomas Waggoner, Capt., 14.0.0 ..." (p. 47)

****** "Pay Bill of the Virginia Regiment by George Washington, 1754 ...... Capt. Peter Hog's company .... Thomas Waggener, Lt.; ..." (p. 51) (Thomas' brother is also listed here,"Edmund Waggener, Sgt.")

****** "Payroll of Capt. Thomas Waggener's Company, 2 days of December 1754 and January. and Feb. 1755. ..." (p.51)

****** "Pay Roll of Capt. Thomas Waggener's Company, Jan. 1756...." (p. 56)

****** "Pay Roll of Thomas Waggener's Company, 1 June 1756. ..." (p. 61)

****** "Pay Roll of Capt. Thomas Waggener's Company, 7 July 1756. ..." ((p. 62)

****** "Pay Roll of Capt. Thomas Waggener's Company for service at Monongahela, 9 July 1756. ..." (p. 63)

****** "Council of War held at Fort Harn, 10 August 1756. The following were present: Capt. Thomas Waggener..." (p. 88)

****** "Pay Roll of Capt. Thomas Waggener's Company, July and August 1756. ..." (p. 89)

****** "Size Roll of Capt. Thomas Waggener's Company, 19 Sept. 1756...." (p. 90)

****** "Petition from Cumberland, 12 November 1756. ..... Thomas Waggener ....." (p. 92)

****** "Pay Roll of Capt. Waggener's Company for Jan., Feb., March, April and May 1757. ..." (p. 93)

****** "Size Roll of Capt. Thomas Waggener's Company at Fort Holland in the South Branch, August 1757. ...." (p. 107)

****** "Necessary Roll of Capt. Thomas Waggneer's Company, 14 Sept. 1757. ..." (p.109)

****** "Necessary Roll of Capt. Thomas Waggener's Company on the South Branch for Sept. 1757. ..." (p.112)

****** "Necessary Roll of Capt. Thomas Waggener's Company on the South Branch, Dec. 1757. ..." (p. 117)

****** "Necessary Roll of Capt. Thomas Waggener's Company, Nov. 1757. ..." (p. 124)

****** "Pay Roll of Capt. Thomas Waggener's Company for Nov. and Dec. 1758, Fort George, 21 Jan. 1758. ..." (p. 124)

****** "Necessary Roll of Capt. Thomas Waggener's Company at Fort Hopewell on the South Branch, 1 March 1758. ..." (p. 125)

****** "Necessary Roll of Capt. Thomas Waggener's Company at Fort Hopewell for the month of March 1758. ..." (p. 126)

****** "Return of Necessaries wanting to complete the sick in the hospital at Rays Town, 6 Oct. 1758. .... From Capt. Waggoner's company: ..." (p. 127)

****** "Pay Roll of the Virginia Regiment from Enlistment to 29th of May 1754. This pay roll was according to an account in the possession of Mr. Carlyle, then Commissary. The roll gave name, rank, date of commissioning or enlistment, and pay (in pounds, shillings, pence). .... Thomas Wagener, Lt., 26 Feb., 92 days, 18.8.0; ..." (p. 133) (Thomas' brother was also listed "Edmund Wagener, 2 March, 6.2.6;")

****** "Miscellaneous Court Martial Records relating to the French and Indian War held at Fort Loudoun. Held 27 May 1757. The following were present: Capt. Thomas Waggener, ...Held 25 and 26 1757. the following were present: .... Capt. Waggener...." (p. 136)

The following record came from the chapter labeled:
"Militia Miscellany; Section I, The following records appear in the journals of the House of Burgesses under the following date given."

****** "Petition of Nathniel Stedman, a soldier in Maj. Lewis's company in the late Virginia Regiment. He was left at Fort Pitt under the command of Capt. Waggoner in 1758..... (record dated) 18 Nov. 1762." (p. 176)

The following 2 records are from the chapter labeled:
      "County and Misc. Loose Papers."

****** "Muster Roll Reported to the Council on 6 November 1771. (Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia) .... Thomas Wagner, 2nd Lt.; ...." (This must have been at the formation of the Virginia Regiment in 1754.) (p. 237)

****** "Muster Roll Reported to Council on 6 November 1772. (Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia) ... Thomas Wagener, ....." (His brother "Edmund Wagener" is in this same roll) (p. 238)

The following 2 records are from the chapter labeled:
      "Bounty Land Applications"
It contains abstracts taken from court order books in various counties, and pertains to different soldiers proving their service in the French and Indian War. The end date is the date of the court session.

****** "James Farguson enlisted 16 June 1757 in the Virginia Regiment under Col. Washington in Capt. Waggoner's Company. 7 Apr. 1780." (p. 251)

****** "James Roberts was a soldier in Capt. Wagoner's Company of Regulars in 1757. 27 Apr. 1780." (p. 261)

===============================

From "Virginia County Records, Volume II, Virginia Colonial Militia 1651-1776," Edited by William Armstrong Crozier; Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. 1986:

The following records are from the chapter titled "The Virginia Regiment"

****** "Commissions sent to Colonel Washington for the Officers of his Virginia Regiment, 1754. .....Tho. Wagener, Capt., July 20 ....." (p.108)

****** "Memorandum List of Officers in the Virginia Regiment, 1754, with Their Pay Severally. .... Thos. Wagener, Lieutenant, 4s. ..." (Col. Joseph Fry is listed as Com'dr in Chief and George Washington Esq., Lieut.-Colonel.) (p. 108)

****** "This pay roll is preserved among the Washington papers in the Department of State at Washington. Pay Roll of the Virginia Regiment. Commencing from the 29th of May and ending July 29th, 1754. ... Captain Thomas Waggoner, 14.0.0 ..." (p. 115)

***** "List of Officers of the Virginia Regiment contained in the Journal of Captain Charles Lewis. Expedition against the French Oct. 10- Dec. 27, 1755. ... Captains ... Thos. Waggoner... " (p. 120)

****** On the same page under the heading "Virginia Officers at Braddock's Defeat, 1755. (K. Killed). (W. Wounded)." is listed "Captain Waggoner" and also "Lieut. Waggener (K)." (I think this shows that Thomas was wounded during the fighting and his brother Edmund was killed.) (p. 120)

=============================

From the Virginia State Library, List of the Colonial Soldiers of Virginia, Special Report of the Department of Archives and History for 1913, H.J. Eckenrode, Archivist:

Speaking of the day of Braddock's defeat, July 9, 1755;
".... The Virginia companies in Braddock's expedition were commanded by Captains Waggoner, Cook, Hogg, Stephen, Polson, Peyronie, Mercer, and Stewart; and there was a troop of Virginia light horse. ..... Nearly all of the Virginia troops present were killed or wounded. Captain Peyronie and Poison were among the killed and Stephen, Waggoner and Stewart among the wounded. ..."

==============================

From "A few Acres of Snow: A Saga of the French and Indian Wars," by Robert Leckie, pub. John Wiley and Sons, New York, 1999, p. 284; sent to my by Crystal Dingler:

"...Only the despised Virginians seemed capable of fighting back. A party of them led by Captain Thomas
Waggener dashed for a huge fallen tree. They threw themselves down behind it and began picking off red men flitting from cover to cover or darting to the road to scalp a dead or a wounded soldier. But the British regulars mistook their only friends for foes and opened fire on the Virginia rear, killing many colonials and forcing the rest to withdraw...."

=============================

From Sandy Fortner:

There is an indenture, made August 8, 1771, between "John Waggener of the County of Culpepper, oldest brother and Heir at Law to Thomas Waggener, late of Culpepper in the First Virginia Regiment, and to Edmund Waggener, late ensign of the said Virginia Regiment, now both deceased, of the one part; and Andrew Waggener of the County of Frederick, oldest son of said John Waggener."

The indenture is for parcels of land on the Ohio River, (part of 200,000 acres apparently granted by proclamation to veterans of the French and Indian War), "which the said Thomas Waggener and Edmund Waggener were entitled as Officers in the said Virginia Regiment and under the proclamation of the Honorable Robert Dinwiddle," and which "the said John Waggener bearth to the said Andrew Waggener and for his better advancement and for the further consideration of Forty Pounds of rent (tax) money in hand paid to the said John Waggener to the said Andrew Waggener."

There is a record of surveyed land from the "Earliest Surveys of Land in Kentucky, made as in Fincastle Co., Kentucky Co., Fayette Co., Jefferson Co., and Lincoln Co., Virginia. Principally "By Virtue of the Governor's Warrant Under His Majesty's Proclamation of October 7, 1763." "For Service in the Late War Between France and Great Britian." From Original Surveys and Plats in the Kentucky Land Office. Catalogued by Philip Fall Taylor, State Archivist of Kentucky. There is a record for Thomas Waggoner, of the rank of Capt. Washington's (presumably meaning Captain under Washington), for 3000 acres, surveyed on July 4, 1774, By Hancock Taylor; Fincastle Co., on S. fork of Elk Horn; cor. to Slaughter and Jones; to Andrew Waggoner, heir-at-law, Ass'd to Edmund Taylor. This would seem to be at least some of the land mentioned in the indenture.

The indenture document seems to clearly indicate that Thomas was dead in 1771, which would mean he did not serve in the American Revolutionary War. Also, the fact that Thomas' brother John is giving the land to John's descendants, would seem to indicate that perhaps Thomas had no descendants.

  viii.   EDMUND WAGGENER, b. Unknown, Essex Co., Virginia; d. 1755.
  Notes for EDMUND WAGGENER:
Edmund Waggener would have been born on the estate of his parents Herbert and Elizabeth Waggener, in Essex County. I believe he was one of his parents younger children, who was probably born in the 1730's. All that is really known about Edmund is his service in the Virginia Regiment during the French and Indian War. He apparently joined it on March 2, 1754, which was apparently about 4 days after his older brother Thomas had joined. Edmund was listed as a Sergeant when he joined, which would seem to indicate that he had some prior military experience. His brother Thomas was listed as a Lieutenant at the time he joined, and he had been serving in the military for at least 10 years.

Edmund (and Thomas) served with George Washington, as they built and manned Ft. Necessity in 1754. Many of the records from 1754 show him as being a Sergeant under Captain Peter Hogg. Edmund fought with Washington in the Battle of Great Meadows on July 9, 1755, and it appears that he was killed in this battle. It also appears that sometime prior to his death, he was promoted. He is described as an Ensign in the indenture from 1771, as a Subaltern in one of the Bounty Land record from 1774, and as a Lieutenant in the apparent record of his death from the regiment. Although his brother Thomas shows up in many of the regiment records from 1756-1758, Edmund's name is not mentioned, which seems to confirm the fact that Edmund died in 1755. There is no record of Edmund being married or having any offspring, and in fact the indenture from 1771 seems to show that he apparently did not.

===============

***** From the Roster of Virginia Militia listed at the Fort Necessity National Battlefield, sent to me courtesy of F.E. "Gene" Waggoner;

The roster lists "The names of soldiers serving under George Washington during the Fort Necessity Campaign. It is a compilation of two sources described below. Spelling of names are as they appear on the separate rosters.

-Title of paper roster: A listing of the Officers, Non commissioned Officers, and Privates serving with G. W. at the Battle of Great Meadows at Fort Necessity in the Summer of 1754.
-Title of the framed pay and muster rolls: A Roll of the Officers and Soldiers in the Service of the Colony Before the Battle of the Meadows the 3rd of July, 1754 as Taken From the Pay and Muster Rolls of These Times.

****** "Edward Wagener, Sergeant" is listed apparently on both rosters

===============

From "Virginia Colonial Soldiers" by Lloyd DeWitt Bockstruck, Copyright 1988, 3rd Printing 1998:

The following listings are in the chapter labeled:
"French and Indian War 1754-1763"
"Anglo-French rivalry in North America erupted in November 1753 when Governor Robert Dinwiddle of Virginia sent George Washington to Fort LeBoeuf to warn the French that they were encroaching on territory claimed by Virginia. Governor Dinwiddle ordered Washington to select a suitable site for a fort to counter the French advance. Construction in the vicinity of present day Pittsburgh began in 1754, and the conflict was joined. The French were overwhelmingly victorious, and Washington capitulated at Great Meadows. He returned to Virginia in disgrace.
With humiliation in 1753 and defeat in 1754, Washington with some 600 Virginians guided Gen. Edward Braddock with 800 regulars to the Ohio River Valley. At Fort Dusquesne the French and their Indian allies surprised the English and badly defeated them. The long, fierce struggle was underway.
In 1755 Washington was placed in command of the Virginia Regiment. The year 1756 almost drove him to despair, and he retired from his command in 1757. In 1758 the Virginia regulars were divided into two regiments, one under the command of Col. William Byrd and the other under Col. George Washington. The latter was sometimes called the First Virginia Regiment, and the former, the Second Virginia Regiment. Virginia forces were quite active in 1758 and participated in Forbes's Expedition in taking Fort Dusquesne. Afterwards Washington resigned his commission and returned home. .....
These papers of George Washington contain the bulk of the entries for the service cited in this chapter. The originals are at the Library of Congress and microfilm copies are widely available."

****** "Pay Bill of Capt. Peter Hog's Company from 29 May until 29 June 1754. The following were paid 2.0.8 each: .... Edmund Waggoner." (p. 47)

8***** "Pay Bill of the Virginia Regiment, Capt. Peter Hog's Company, 29 Sept. 1754. Edmund Waggoner, Sgt., 4.11.6; ..." (p. 48)

****** "List of Soldiers who have received the County's Bounty Money 1754. .... Capt. Peter Hogg's Company: Edmund Waggoner, Sgt.; ..." (p. 50)

****** " Pay Bill of the Virginia Regiment by George Washington, 1754: .... Capt. Peter Hog's company: ... Edmund Waggener, Sgt.; ..." (p. 51) (Edmund's brother "Thomas Waggener, Lt.;" is also listed here.)

****** "Pay Roll of the Virginia Regiment from Enlistment to 29th of May 1754. This pay roll was according to an account in the possession of Mr. Caryle, then Commissary. The roll gave name, rank, date of commissioning of enlistment, and pay (in pounds, shillings, pence).... Edmund Wagener, Sgt. 2 March, 6.2.6; ..." (p. 133) (Edmund's brother "Thomas Wagener, Lt." is listed as apparently joining February 26.)

****** "Muster Roll reported to the Council on 6 November 1771. (Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia) ... Edmund Wagener, Sgt.: ..." (p. 237) (Edmund's brother "Thomas Wagner, 2nd Lt." is also listed.)

****** " Muster Roll Reported to Council on 6 November 1772. (Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia) ... Edmund Wagener, ..." (p. 238) ("Thomas Wagener" is also listed)

****** From a Chapter titled "Bounty Land Warrants" ..."Warrant for 1,000 acres issued to Edmund Taylor, assignee of Andrew Waggoner, heir at law of Edmund Waggoner, as proved by certificate from Lord Dunmore."

==================

From "Virginia County Records, Volume II, Virginia Colonial Militia 1651-1776," Edited by William Armstrong Crozier; Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. 1986:

From the Chapter entitled "Land Bounty Certificates, For Service in the French and Indian Wars," and described as: "For participation in the wars of the Colony of Virginia against the French and Indians, and for service rendered by the Militia in defence of the frontiers, the King's Proclamation of 1763 granted certain amounts of land. ...":

****** "Edmund Wagner, deceased, a subaltern in the Virginia Regiment, entitles to 2,000 acres of land. Andrew Wagner is his heir. March 7, 1774. (Signed) Dunmore, Govr." (p. 11)

From the chapter entitled "The Virginia Regiment":

****** "Pay Roll of Capt. Peter Hog's Company. Edmond Waggoner, Serjeant L4.11.6 ..." (p. 115)

****** "Members of the Virginia Regiment who have received Bounty Money. The following lists are preserved in the "Force Manuscripts" in the Library of Congress. On the back of the five rolls is the endorsement of Washington. ... A List of Captain Hogg's Company who have received his Excellency's Bounty Money. ... Edmund Waggoner, Serj." (p. 118)

****** "List of Officers of the Virginia Regiment contained in the Journal of Captain Charles Lewis. Expedition against the French Oct. 10- Dec. 27, 1755. .... Virginia Officers at Braddock's defeat, 1755. (k. Killed). (W. Wounded). ... Lieut. Waggener (K)..." (p.120)
I don't know if Edmund is listed here as a Lieutenant incorrectly, rather than as an Ensign or Subaltern, or whether he was promoted just before his apparent death. His brother Thomas listed as "Captain Waggoner," is also on this same list, without a "K" or a "W" after his name. I believe he was wounded in this battle.

===============

From Sandy Fortner:

There is an indenture, made August 8, 1771, between "John Waggener of the County of Culpeper, oldest brother and Heir at Law to Thomas Waggener, late of Culpeper in the First Virginia Regiment, and to Edmund Waggener, late ensign of the said Virginia Regiment, now both deceased, of the one part; and Andrew Waggener of the County of Frederick, oldest son of said John Waggener."

The indenture is for parcels of land on the Ohio River, (part of 200,00 acres apparently granted by proclamation to veterans of the French and Indian War), "which the said Thomas Waggener and Edmund Waggener were entitled as Officers in the said Virginia Regiment and under the proclamation of the Honorable Robert Dinwiddle," and which "the said John Waggener bearth to the said Andrew Waggener and for his better advancement and for the further consideration of Forty Pounds of rent (tax) money in hand paid to the said John Waggener to the said Andrew Waggener."

There is a record of surveyed land from the "Earliest Surveys of Land in Kentucky, made as in Fincastle Co., Kentuck Co., Fayette Co., Jefferson Co., and Lincoln Co., Virginia. Principally "By Virtue of the Governor''s Warrant Under His Majesty's Proclamation of October 7, 1763." "For Service in the Late War Between France and Great Britian." From Original Surveys and Plats in the Kentucky Land Office. Catalogued by Philip Fall Taylor, State Archivist of Kentucky. There are two records for Edmund Waggener. The first, lists his rank as Subaltern Va. Regt., and is for 1000 acres, surveyed June 8, 1774, by Hancock Taylor, Fincastle Co., on head branches of Beargrass Creek- cor. to John Ashby, to Andrew Waggener, heir-at-law, Ass'd to Edmund Taylor. The second lists Edmund Waggoner, dec'd, of the rank of Subaltern, for 1000 acres, surveyed on October 29, 1783, By B. Netherland, Jefferson Co. on Ohio River-- Tennant's line. Ass'd to Andrew Waggoner, heir-at-law-- to Edmund Taylor. These parcels of land would seem to possibly be the ones mentioned in the indenture.

The indenture clearly shows that Edmund was deceased by the year 1771. As mentioned above, it is believed he died in the Battle of Great Meadows in July of 1755. The fact that John Waggener, acting as executor for Edmund's estate, gave these parcels of land to his own son, rather than a descendant of Edmund''s, would seem to indicate that Edmund had no spouse of offspring.

10. ix.   GREENSBY WAGGENER, b. Unknown; d. Abt. 1798.
11. x.   REUBEN WAGGENER, b. Bef. 1765, Essex Co., Virginia; d. Abt. 1818, Adair Co., Kentucky.


[ Home Page | First Page | Previous Page | Next Page | Last Page ]
Home | Help | About Us | Biography.com | HistoryChannel.com | Site Index | Terms of Service | PRIVACY
© 2009 Ancestry.com