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Ancestors of Kerry Ann Smith


      1224. Edward Holeman, born Abt. 1673 in Kentucky County, Maryland; died Bef. November 14, 1705 in Cecil County, Maryland.
     
Child of Edward Holeman is:
  612 i.   Edward Holeman, born 1699 in Kentucky County, Maryland; died September 11, 1743 in Kentucky County, Maryland; married Rosetta Vansandt September 11, 1743 in Kentucky County, Maryland.


      1226. Joris Gerretse Vansandt, born April 24, 1687 in Flatbush, Kings County, America (New York); died March 22, 1755 in Kentucky County, Maryland. He was the son of 2452. Gerrit Stoffelse Vansandt and 2453. Lysbeth Gerretze. He married 1227. Maike Vandergrift December 17, 1706 in First Church Presby., Philadeplhia, Philadephia, Pennsylvania.

      1227. Maike Vandergrift, born 1689 in Brenkelise, (Brooklyn), Kings County, New York; died in Kentuck County, Maryland. She was the daughter of 2454. Nicholas Jacobse Vandergrift and 2455. Barentje Janse Verkercken.

More About Joris Gerretse Vansandt:
Christening: April 24, 1687, New Utrecht, Kings County, New York
     
Children of Joris Vansandt and Maike Vandergrift are:
  i.   Elizabeth Vansandt, born January 14, 1706/07 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania; died October 03, 1763 in Kentuck County, Maryland.
  ii.   Nicholas Vansandt, born August 04, 1709 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania; died May 09, 1801.
  iii.   Gerrit Vansandt, born December 31, 1710 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania.
  More About Gerrit Vansandt:
Christening: December 31, 1710, First Pres. Church, Philadephia, Pennsylvania

  iv.   George Vansandt, born March 31, 1712 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania; died February 28, 1770 in Kentuck County, Maryland.
  More About George Vansandt:
Clan: March 31, 1712, First Pres. Church, Philadephia, Pennsylvania

  v.   Hester Vansandt, born October 04, 1714 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania.
  613 vi.   Rosetta Vansandt, born May 13, 1716 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania; died Aft. 1760 in Kentucky County, Maryland; married Edward Holeman September 11, 1743 in Kentucky County, Maryland.
  vii.   Cornelious Vansandt, born January 24, 1716/17 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania; died March 03, 1795 in Kentuck County, Maryland.
  viii.   Benjamin Vansandt, born March 31, 1719 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania; died April 06, 1792.
  ix.   Ephraim Vansandt, born August 04, 1723 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania; died Bet. 1799 - 1800.
  x.   Ann Vansandt, born April 04, 1723 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania; died December 06, 1773 in Kentuck County, Maryland.
  xi.   John Vansandt, born December 18, 1724 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania; died February 02, 1773.
  xii.   Jacob Vansandt, born February 07, 1726/27 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania; died February 07, 1725/26.
  xiii.   Mary Vansandt, born September 08, 1730 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania.
  More About Mary Vansandt:
Christening: September 08, 1730.


      1228. James Rue, born Abt. 1685 in Bensalem Township, Buc, Bucks, Pennsylvania; died Bef. November 29, 1769 in Bensalem Township, Buc, Bucks, Pennsylvania. He was the son of 2456. Matthew Rue. He married 1229. Mary Abt. 1724 in Bensalem, Bucks, Pennsylvania.

      1229. Mary, born Abt. 1705 in Bensalem Township, Buc, Bucks, Pennsylvania; died Bef. November 29, 1769 in Bensalem, Bucks County, Pennsylvania.
     
Children of James Rue and Mary are:
  i.   Mary Rue, born Abt. 1717 in Bensalem Township, Buc, Bucks, Pennsylvania.
  ii.   Richard Rue, born Abt. 1719 in Bensalem Township, Buc, Bucks, Pennsylvania; died Bef. March 04, 1803 in Bensalem Township, Buc, Bucks, Pennsylvania.
  iii.   Matthew Rue, born Bef. 1721 in Bensalem Township, Buc, Bucks, Pennsylvania; died Aft. July 28, 1796.
  614 iv.   Samuel Rue, born 1725 in Bensalem, Bucks County, Pennsylvania; died Bef. October 29, 1767 in Kentuck County, Maryland; married Alshea VanSandt March 27, 1746 in Churchville, Bucks, Pennsylvania.
  v.   Joseph Rue, born Abt. 1727 in Bucks County, Pennsylvania.
  vi.   John Rue, born Abt. 1729 in Bucks County, Pennsylvania.
  vii.   Katherine Rue, born Abt. 1731 in Bucks County, Pennsylvania.
  viii.   Elizabeth Rue, born Abt. 1733 in Bucks County, Pennsylvania.
  ix.   Sarah Rue, born Abt. 1735 in Bucks County, Pennsylvania.


      1230. Stoffel Vanzandt23, born 1670 in New York, New York County, New York; died 1749 in Middletown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. He married 1231. Rachel Coursen Bef. 1699 in Kings, New York.

      1231. Rachel Coursen, born Abt. 1681 in Staten Island, Richmond County, New York; died in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. She was the daughter of 2462. Hendrick Coursen.
     
Children of Stoffel Vanzandt and Rachel Coursen are:
  i.   James VanSandt, born Abt. 1698 in Long Island, New York.
  ii.   Elizabeth VanSandt, born Abt. 1700 in Bensalem Township, Buc, Bucks, Pennsylvania; died Bef. June 24, 1749.
  iii.   Joshua VanSandt, born Abt. 1702 in Bensalem Township, Buc, Bucks, Pennsylvania; died Bef. January 01, 1771 in Kentuck County, Maryland.
  iv.   John VanSandt, born Abt. 1705 in Middletown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania; died 1750 in Middletown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania.
  v.   Alice VanSandt, born Abt. 1708 in Middletown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania.
  vi.   Garret VanSandt, born Abt. 1709 in Middletown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania; died Bef. August 07, 1789 in Middletown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania.
  vii.   Rachel VanSandt, born Abt. 1710 in Middletown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania.
  viii.   Jesina VanSandt, born 1711; died Bef. May 1766 in Bucks County, Pennsylvania.
  More About Jesina VanSandt:
Christening: January 04, 1710/11, Sammenie, Bensalem, Bucks, Pennsylvania

  615 ix.   Alshea VanSandt, born 1727 in Bensalem Township, Buc, Bucks, Pennsylvania; died Bef. 1760 in Kentuck County, Maryland; married Samuel Rue March 27, 1746 in Churchville, Bucks, Pennsylvania.


      1234. Adam Moonse, born Abt. 1745. He married 1235. Eve.

      1235. Eve, born Abt. 1749.
     
Child of Adam Moonse and Eve is:
  617 i.   Sarah Mary Elizabeth Moonse, married Christian Wyman


      1344. Christian Stover24, born March 29, 1663 in Switzerland.
     
Child of Christian Stover is:
  672 i.   Jacob Stover, Sr., born 1685 in Berne, Switzerland; died March 17, 1740/41 in Orange County, Virginia; married (1) Sarah Boone March 15, 1714/15 in Christ Church, Philadelphia, Philadephia County, Pennsylvania; married (2) Margaret; married (3) Ruth


      1346. George Boone III, born March 19, 1665/66 in Stoke Canon, New Exeter, Devonshire, England; died February 27, 1743/44 in Exter Township, Berks, America (Pennsylvania). He was the son of 2692. George Boone II and 2693. Sarah Mary Uppey. He married 1347. Mary Milton Maugridge August 16, 1689 in Stoke, Canon, Devonshire, England.

      1347. Mary Milton Maugridge, born Bet. 1668 - 1669 in Bradninch, Exeter, Devonshire, England; died February 02, 1739/40 in Exter Township, Berks, America (Pennsylvania). She was the daughter of 2694. John Maugridge and 2695. Mary Milton.

Notes for George Boone III:
George Boone, III was born at Stoak, near Exeter, in Devonshire, England in 1666. He was the son of George Boone II who died at the age of 60 years and Sarah Uppey Boone who died at the age of 80 years. George Boone III grew up and married Mary Maugridge, daughter of John and Mary Milton Maugridge of Bradnich, Devonshire, England. The couple had at least nine children, George Boone IV, Sarah Boone, Squire Boone, Mary Boone, John Boone who never married, Joseph Boone, Benjamin Boone, James Boone and Samuel Boone.

George Boone, III was a weaver. On 17 August 1717, George Boone, III, his wife Mary Maugridge Boone and their children still at home left Bradnich, Devonshire, England, which is a town eight miles from Exeter and one hundred seventy seven miles from London, and traveled to Bristol, England. From their they booked ship passage to Philadelphia. They arrived in Philadelphia on 29 September 1717 (old style). They had sent their children, George Boone, Sarah Boone and Squire Boone to America a few years earlier.

The family arrived at Philadelphia and travelled to Abington where they stayed a few months. They left Abington in 1718 and moved to North Wales where they lived two years. Then in 1720, they settled in Oley, Exeter Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania.

Exeter was at the western edge of European settlement in southeastern Pennsylvania. Before the 1750s this frontier was one of the most peaceful in all of North America, though, to be sure, European colonialism had introduced terrible turmoil into Indian societies. As a result of first Swedish, then Dutch, then subsequently English colonization, the native peoples of the Susquehanna and Delaware river region were devastated by imported diseases, reducing their village populations by as much as 90 percent by the eighteenth century. Commercial trade reoriented native economic life and introduced cutthroat competition among colonists and Indians alike for access to valuable fur-bearing regions and merchant centers.

Unlike other colonies, however, Quaker authorities organized no militia or army, negotiated with Indians over the title to land, and promised natives "the full and free privileges and Immunities of all the Said Laws as any other Inhabitants." A de facto alliance between Pennsylvania and the powerful Iroquois Confederacy of western New York further contributed to a half century of peace attracted by this policy, a number of Indian peoples, dislocated from their homelands by the reverberating effects of colonization relocated in Pennsylvania. In the early century Conoys and Nanticokes from the Chesapeake, Tuscaroras and Tutelos from the Piedmont of North Carolina, and Shawnees from southern Ohio joined Susquehannocks and Delawares in the upriver country of southeastern Pennsylvania. Within twenty or thirty miles of the Boone home were numerous Indian settlements, and beyond the Oley Hills, in the Lehigh and Lebanon valleys, were multi-ethnic Indian communities, including Manangy's Town, later renamed Reading when it was Americanized in midcentury. Down the Schuylkill was Manatawny, later called Pottstown.

The North American frontier was a distinctive milieu, where peoples of different cultural origins made contact and conducted business with one another. This was good for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and during the first half of the eighteenth century the Indian trade accounted for nearly a third of the Commonwealth's foreign exchange. As merchants, Pennsylvania authorities wanted Indians near at hand. But the colony also operated as a land company, and as real estate agents, authorities sought to gain possession of Indian lands in order to sell tracts to emigrants like the Boones who began pouring into the colony in 1713 at the end of Queen Anne's War. That this was accomplished by what one Iroquois chief described as "Pen-and-Ink work" rather than warfare marked the Pennsylvania frontier as distinct.

Despite the peace, however, even Pennsylvania grew tense with growing Indian resentments and settler fears. At Manatawny in 1728, a party of Shawnees got into a fight with settlers who refused to provide them with food. There was an exchange of gunfire and one Indian was wounded. The Boone neighborhood, just ten miles away, was thrown into panic. George Boone, III, local magistrate, sent a dispatch to the colonial governor pleading for assistance "in order to defend our frontiers." "Our Inhabitants are Generally fled," he wrote, but "there remains about 20 men with me to guard my mill, where I have about 1,000 bushels of wheat and flour, and we are resolved to defend ourselves to ye last Extremity." Sometime later a dozen Shawnees, perhaps the same group, extorted food and drink from a few terrorized families in the area. A posse of about twenty local men pursued them, and in a short fight, two settlers were wounded. That concluded the only record of Indian warfare at Olny, but it was evidence of increasing settlement and congestion. Under such pressures Shawnees, Delawares, and other Indians began moving west, into the mountains or beyond. A steady stream of Indians, however, continued to pass along the Perkiomen Path, which cut directly through the Boone neighborhood.

George Boone, III enjoyed a reputation among the Indians for befriending natives. During the conflict of 1728 he led the rescue of two Indian girls held by a group of settlers who harbored lustful and murderous intentions. Indian hunters and diplomats passing along the path knew they could find food, drink, and a place to sleep at the Boone homestead. When Sassoonan, known as "king" of the Schuylkill Delawares, stopped for a time at the Boone place on his way to Philadelphia, with his retinue of twenty-five men, women, and children in 1736, the visit was important enough to record.

Mary Maugridge Boone died on 2 February 1740 at the age of 72 years. She was buried in the Friends Burial Ground in Exeter Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania. Squire Boone's father, George Boone, III died on 27 July 1744 at the age of 78 years. He was also buried in the Friends Burial Ground in Exeter Township.

bib: Early Families of Eastern & Southeastern Kentucky and Their Descendants, William C. Kozee, Baltimore, 1979 (Olathe Public Library); Genealogies of Kentucky Families, A-M, The Register of the Kentucky Hist. Society, 1981 (Olathe Public Library); Daniel Boone by John Mack Faragher, Henry Holt and Co., New York, 1992.

George Boone II and his wife moved to Clay, (now Exeter), Berks County, Pennsylvania. The historical site of the home is marked, and was built in 1733 by George Boone.

The site of the original log house built in 1730 is now 14 miles from Reading, Pennsylvania.

The Boones were all Quakers when they came to Pennsylvania.

George Boon III went on to serve for many years as justice of the peace, and when he became too old and frail to continue, the position passed to his oldest son, George Jr.

They "joined themselves to Gwynedd Meeting." When population growth led to the division of Oley township in 1741, the section in which the Boones resided was renamed Exeter, in honor of their English origins.


More About George Boone III:
Burial: July 28, 1744, Friends Burial Gound, Exeter Township, Berks, Pennsylvania
Christening: March 19, 1665/66, Stoke, New Exeter, Devonshire, England
Occupation: A Weaver by trade

More About Mary Milton Maugridge:
Burial: February 04, 1739/40, Friends Burial Gound, Exeter Township, Berks, Pennsylvania
Christening: December 23, 1669, St. Disen's Church, Bradninch, Devonshire, Enland

Marriage Notes for George Boone and Mary Maugridge:
George Boone III and Mary Milton Maugridge had landed in America at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on October 20, 1717.

George Boone became prominently identified with the Gwynned Monthly Meeting, by which he was appointed in 1723 to keep the church records of the births, marriages and deaths. In 1725 a monthly meeting was established for the Quakers in Olney, and on Dec. 24, 1736, George Boone and wife granted to a board of trustees (Anthony Lee, John Webb, George Boone, Jr., their son and sons-in-law) one acre of ground in trust for the use of the people called Quakers in Olney. This was the origin of what is now known as the Exeter Monthly Meeting where seven generations of the Boone family have worshiped.

George Boone, Sr. was for many years a Justice of Peace under English sovereignty, an extensive landowner and man of affairs. He was a leader in the Society of Friends and had wide influence among his neighbors. He died in 1740, aged 78 years, and was buried in the Exeter burying grounds as was also his wife. His Bible, now in possession of descendants, states that he left eight children, 52 grandchildren, and ten great grandchildren, in all 70, the number that Jacob took down to Egypt (Bible).


     
Children of George Boone and Mary Maugridge are:
  i.   George Boone IV25,26, born July 13, 1690 in Bradninch, Exeter, Devonshire, England; died November 20, 1753 in Exter Township, Berks, Devon, Pennsylvania; married Deborah Howell August 27, 1713 in Abinton, Phildelphia County, Pennsylvania; born November 03, 1691 in Chester County, Pennsylvania; died January 26, 1759 in Oley Township, Pennsylvania.
  Notes for George Boone IV:
George IV Boone was a Quaker. He began as a school teacher in Exter Township, Berks, Devon County, Pennsylvania. He became a professor in the First College of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Through his studies, he also became the secretary to William Penn.

William Penn gave Pennsylvania a written constitution which limited the power of government, provided a humane penal code, and guaranteed many fundamental liberties. Penn was the only person who made major contributions to liberty in both the New World and the Old World. Before he conceived the idea of Pennsylvania, he became the leading defender of religious toleration in England. He was imprisoned six times for speaking out courageously. While in prison, he wrote one pamphlet after another, which gave Quakers a literature and attacked intolerance. He alone proved capable of challenging oppressive government policies in court--one of his cases helped secure the right to trial by jury. Penn used his diplomatic skills and family connections to get large numbers of Quakers out of jail. He saved many from the gallows.




  More About George Boone IV:
Burial: 1753, Quaker Cemetery, Exter Township, Berks, Devon, Pennsylvania
Christening: July 20, 1690, St. Disen's Church, Bradninch, Devonshire, Enland

  More About Deborah Howell:
Burial: February 1759, Quaker Cemetery, Exter Township, Berks, Devon, Pennsylvania
Religion: Quaker Minister

  Marriage Notes for George Boone and Deborah Howell:
Deborah Howell and George IV Boone were married at the Ablington Meeting, Abington, Phildelphia County, Pennsylvania.

  673 ii.   Sarah Boone, born February 29, 1691/92 in Bradninch, Exeter, Devonshire, England; died November 20, 1743 in Berks, Pennsylvania; married Jacob Stover, Sr. March 15, 1714/15 in Christ Church, Philadelphia, Philadephia County, Pennsylvania.
  iii.   Mary Boone I, born September 26, 1694 in Bradninch, Exeter, Devonshire, England; died May 20, 1696 in Bradninch, Exeter, Devonshire, England.
  More About Mary Boone I:
Burial: May 20, 1696, Cemetery, Bradninch, Exeter, Devonshire, England
Christening: September 26, 1694, Bradninch, Exeter, Devonshire, England

  iv.   Squire Boone, born November 25, 1696 in Bradninch, Exeter, Devonshire, England; died January 02, 1765 in Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina; married Sara Morgan September 23, 1720 in Gwenedd, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; born 1701 in Bala, Wales, England; died 1777 in Mocksville, Davie County, North Carolina.
  Notes for Squire Boone:
Father of Daniel Boone (see booneinfo.com for complete line).

Squire Boone was born probably in Bradnich, Devonshire, England on 25 November 1696. Squire Boone was small of stature, fair complextion, with red hair and blue-gray eyes. He had a broad Cornish accent and was notable for their clannishness. He came to America with his brother and sister George and Sarah prior to 1713. He inspected the region of the Oley Valley near where Reading, Pennsylvania now lies. It was still the wild edge of the frontier. He judged the area a splendid site for a new clan homeland and sent word to the remaining Boone relatives in Devonshire, many of whom soon settled nearby. The Boones were Quackers.

Squire Boone married Sarah Morgan at Gwynedd Meeting House on 13 July 1720. The first ten years of Squire Boone's married life were spent near Gwynedd. He practiced the same trades he did in the old country. He supplemented income from his blacksmith shop and a weaving business with subsistence farming, a job often handled by family women and children.

In 1730, Squire Boone bought 250 acres of forest and meadow in the upper Schuylkill Valley in Exeter Township, then Oley, Berks County, Pennsylvania. On his farm was an outcropping of rock with a spring welling up from it. There, on top of the rock, Squire Boone built a one room log cabin where he and his growing family eked out a living.

Squire and Sarah Morgan Boone had a number of children, Sarah Boone, Israel Boone, Samuel Boone, Jonathan Boone, Elizabeth Boone, Daniel Boone (the famous frontiersman), Mary Boone, George Boone, Edward Boone, Nathan Boone, Squire Boone, Jr., and Hannah Boone.

On 1 May 1750, Squire Boone and his family moved to a place near Winchester, Virginia. Then in 1753, they moved on to a farm on the Yadkin River in Davidson County, North Carolina.

bib: Early Families of Eastern & Southeastern Kentucky and Their Descendants, William C. Kozee, Baltimore, 1979 (Olathe Public Library); Genealogies of Kentucky Families, A-M, The Register of the Kentucky Hist. Society, 1981 (Olathe Public Library); Daniel Boone by John Mack Faragher, Henry Holt and Co., New York, 1992; Colonial Homes, June 1994;

  More About Squire Boone:
Burial: January 1765, Jappa Cemetery, Mocksville, Rowan, North Carolina
Christening: December 25, 1696, Bradninch, Exeter, Devonshire, England

  Notes for Sara Morgan:
Old record of the Gwynedd Meeting states that Sarah Morgan Boone was a "sister to the father of Col. Daniel Morgan of the Revolution Rifle Men." known to fame as General Daniel Morgan of the Virginia Line.
bib: Early Families of Eastern & Southeastern Kentucky and Their Descendants by William C. Kozee - Baltimore 1979 (Olathe, Kansas Public Library).


  Marriage Notes for Squire Boone and Sara Morgan:
Two of the most interesting landmarks in the Schuylkill Valley are the birthplace of Daniel Boone and the old Quaker meeting house where he attended services, and where some of his family are buried in Exeter Township, in Berks County, Pennsylvania.

Only a portion of the old house in which the famous pioneer first saw the light is still standing, a larger structure having been built around it nearly 100 years ago, and efforts are being made by local historical societies to have the state purchase the property and restore the structure to its original condition.

The original building stands on part of the original tract of 250 acres which Squire Boone (Daniel's father) purchased in 1730 and not far from the spot where his grand­father, George Boone, settled upon his arrival from England in 1717. It is well removed from the beaten paths of travel, standing in a hollow which is screened in every direction by hills about a mile to the east of the Schuylkill River. The old house was constructed both as a home and a fort for pro­tection against the Indians. The walls were very thick and built with the largest stones as was possible to use, while the windows provided portholes through which muskets could be fired. The house was built over a rapidly flowing spring in order that there might be an abundance of water in the event of a siege.

When the Indians became troublesome, the settlers for miles around gathered in the Squire Boone home where the savages feared to attack them.

Daniel Boone was born here in this house on Aug. 22, 1734. He was the son of Squire and Sarah Morgan Boone. His grandfather, George Boone, and wife emigrated from Exeter, Devonshire, England in 1717. They were Friend Quakers and followed William Penn to the new world to escape from religious persecution and settled in what was then Philadelphia county, naming the region Exeter after his English home.








  v.   Mary Boone, born September 23, 1699 in Stoak, Exeter, Devonshire, England; died January 16, 1774 in Reading, Berks County, Pennsylvania; married John Webb, Jr. September 13, 1720 in Gwynedd Meeting, Berks County, Pennsylvania; born 1694 in Exeter, Berks County, Pennsylvania; died October 18, 1774 in Exeter, Berks County, Pennsylvania.
  More About Mary Boone:
Burial: 1774, Cemetery, Pennsylvania
Christening: October 13, 1699, Bradninch, Exeter, Devonshire, England

  vi.   John Boone, born January 14, 1701/02 in Bradninch, Exeter, Devonshire, England; died October 10, 1785 in Exter Township, Berks, Devon, Pennsylvania.
  Notes for John Boone:
John Boone was a school teacher and the first to keep track of the family line; he did not marry.



  More About John Boone:
Burial: October 11, 1785, Friends Burial Gound, Exeter Township, Berks, Pennsylvania
Christening: January 30, 1700/01, Bradninch, Exeter, Devonshire, England

  vii.   Joseph Boone, born April 05, 1704 in Stoak, Exeter, Devonshire, England; died January 30, 1776 in Reading, Berks, Pennsylvania; married Catherine; born 1708; died 1778.
  More About Joseph Boone:
Burial: February 01, 1776, Exeter Township, Berks, Devon, Pennsylvania
Christening: April 05, 1704, Bradninch, Exeter, Devonshire, England

  viii.   Benjamin Boone, born July 16, 1706 in Bradninch, Exeter, Devonshire, England; died October 17, 1762 in Exeter Township, Berks, Devon, Pennsylvania; married (1) Ann Farmer 1726; married (2) Susannah Lykins 1736; born 1708; died 1784.
  More About Benjamin Boone:
Christening: July 16, 1706, Bradninch, Exeter, Devonshire, England

  ix.   James Boone, Sr., born July 18, 1709 in Stoak, Exeter, Devonshire, England; died September 01, 1785 in Exeter Township, Berks, Devon, Pennsylvania; married (1) Anne Griffith; born 1713; married (2) Mary Foulke May 15, 1735; born December 05, 1714; died February 20, 1756.
  More About James Boone, Sr.:
Burial: September 03, 1785, Friends Burial Gound, Exeter Township, Berks, Pennsylvania
Christening: July 07, 1709, Bradninch, Exeter, Devonshire, England

  x.   Samuel Boone, born July 07, 1711 in Stoak, Exeter, Devonshire, England; died August 06, 1745 in Reading, Berks, Pennsylvania; married Elizabeth Cassell October 29, 1734 in Pennsylvania; born Abt. 1710.
  More About Samuel Boone:
Burial: August 07, 1745, Exeter Township, Berks, Devon, Pennsylvania.


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