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View Tree for Richard EdelenRichard Edelen (b. Abt. 1639, d. Aft. May 05, 1694)

Richard Edelen was born Abt. 1639 in Middlesex County, England, and died Aft. May 05, 1694 in St. Mary's County, Maryland. He married Elizabeth Banton on October 29, 1663 in St. Peters Church, Pauls' Wharf, London, England.

 Includes NotesNotes for Richard Edelen:
Richard Edelen (1635-1694) was born in Middlesex, England (near London), one of three children born to Reverend Philip and Catherine (Offley) Edelen. In an article in the "Chronicals of St. Mary", Joseph H. Edelen and Crolian W. Edelen provide an overview of Richard Edelen's family in England, which is summarized here;

.....

From "Charles County Centry, pages 126 - 128

Richard Edelen, yonger son of Philip and Catherine (Offley) Edelen, was born about 1635 in Middlesex, England. About 1664 he married Elizabeth - - - - , and left for Maryland perhaps in the same year. They were in the Providence, however, by February 1664/65, as proved by the following document:

"I Richard Edelen do from me and my heirs assign and make over unto Daniel Jenifer and his heirs all my full rights title and interest of mine and Elizabeth's my wife's right to land for either of our transportation unto this Province as Witness my hand this ninth day of February one thousand six hunderd and sixty - four".

Witness by
Edward Savage


.....




Below is a copy of the marriage license for Elizabeth and Richard, October 29, 1663

"W(hi)ch day appeared personally Thomas French of the Parish of St. Peter neare Pauls Warfe Lond(on) Parish clerke (and) alledged that Richard Edelen of the Parish of St. Andrews undershaft Lond(on) Merchant age d about 24 years intendeth to marry W(i)th Elizabeth Banton of the same Parish Spinster aged likewise 24 years or thereabouts (and) soe at her owne disposall: of the truth of all wh(i)ch as alsoe (that)t there is no lawful Lett or impedim(en)t by any reason of any r(re) contract Affinity Consanguinity or otherwise to hinder the sayd intended Marryage he made Oath (and) prayed liscence for them to be marryed in the Parish Church of St. Peter afores(ai)d."

(signed) Tho. ffrench


.....




In 1665 he declared his intentions of returning to England before a session of the Provincial Court. All indications point to the fact that his wife elizabeth accompanied him and their first son, Philip, was born. He returned to the Province before the spring of 1669, at which time he established headrights for his wife and son.

In 1670 richard Edelen was appointed Deputy Surveyor of the Province by Baker Brooke, then the Surveyor General. It is believed that he held the position continuous until after the establishment of the Church of England as State Church with the consequence that all Roman Catholics were disenfranchised and prohibited from holding office. In 1693 by order of the Council he was requested to continue as Deputy Surveyor of St. Mary's County until further orders. During the session of the Assembly from November 14 to December 8, 1688, he officiated as doorkeeper and for his services he received 1,200 pounds of tobacco.

In 1674 richard Edelen and Justinian funnis were appointed by the Prerogative Court to appraise the estate of Captain William Boreman (Boarman) late of St. Mary's County. About this time "richard Edelen of St. Mary's County, Gent., "was requested by the court to make returns of the verbal will of Thomas Mathews, Jr. Late of St. Mary's County.

In 1675 he with James Bowling was ordered to appraise the estate of Daniel Russel, late of St. Mary's County, and on February 4, 1675/6, he appeared in the court as the executor of the estate of Samuel Cressey. Subsequently, the Deputy Commissary issued citation against him as the executor of the estate of Samuel Cressey. On October 8, 1677, Richard Edelen, Gent., appeared in court as the "executor of the will of Samuel Cressey, late of Charles County who was the executor of Daniel Russel late of St. Mary's County.

On August 10, 1682, Richard Edelen served judgement upon Samuel Raspin, late of Charles County. On August 26, 1683, before the Prerogative Court he stated that Henry Aspinwall of Charles County died interstate and that Elizabeth his widow desired letters of administration, but not being able to travel to court appointed him her attonery. In December 1686, he was ordered to appraise the estate of John Clarke, late of St. Mary's County. On October 28, 1687, Richard Edelen and George Butler, Gent., were summoned to appar at the November Court. And in February 1687/8, he and Maramaduke Semmes were ordered to appraise the estate of Dennis Husculos.

Richard Edelen survived his wife by several years. On March 5, 1694/5, he made his will, dying shortly afterwards. On July 31, of the same year, the will was admitted to probate in St. Mary's County, by John Bowling, James Hogan, and Bowling Speake.

He requested that the dwelling-plantation in St. Mary's County be divided equally among his five surviving children. In addition Richard was devised 100 acres of land purchased from Major Boarman and 86 acres of "St. Christopher". Edward and Christopher received equally 200 acres of "Dublin" then lying in Charles County. Thomas was devised 250 acres of unamed land while Catherine, his only daughter, was bequeathed personalty.

The court appointed the two sons, Richard and Edward, as the executors, but only Richard appeared at court in August 1695 to receive the official letters of administration. The inventory of the personal estate was exhibited at court on May 16, 1696, by Richard Edelen "under the hands and seal of William Boarman, Jr. , and Anthony Sims".



.........


Source: The Peaks of Nelson County, Kentucky

Richard Edelen (4), son of Rev. Philip Edelen and Catherine Offley, was born around 1639 in Middlesex, England. He married Elizabeth Banton on October 29, 1663 in London. At some point Richard Edelen (4) converted to Catholicism, and he immigrated to Maryland in 1664. He returned to England in 1665, and his first son, Philip (2) , was bor there. Richard returned to Maryland, registering his cattle mark on March 22, 1667. His wife and child came to Maryland in 1669. He received land for bringing his son to the colony. Richard was appointed Deputy Surveyor General of the Province of Maryland on Nov. 10, 1676. Although Catholics were disenfranchised in Maryland when the Protestants took control of the government in the 1690's, Richard Edelen (4) was requested by an order of the Council to continue in his work as surveyor until further notice.







Note: - Edelen Genealogy
http://www.ghg.net/edelen/
If your last name is Edelen, Edelin, or Edlin; or included among your ancestors is someone with this surname, chances are you are descended from Richard Edelen of Maryland, the only known Edelen immigrant to America*. Richard Edelen and his wife Elizabeth Banton immigrated from England to Maryland in 1664, just 30 years after the colony was first founded. They settled in St. Mary's County and had six children, four of whom became successful planters in Charles and Prince Georges County. Over the years, many of their descendants moved westward as the country expanded--Kentucky, West Virginia, and Missouri in particular. Today, some ten generations later, an estimated 60,000 descendants of Richard and Elizabeth Edelen can be found all over the country, as well as in southern Maryland, the cradle of our American family.

- VERY good information found at http://www.ghg.net/edelen/People1.html
Colonial Era
1) Richard Edelen (1635-1694) was born in Middlesex, England (near London), one of three children born to Reverend Philip and Catherine (Offley) Edelen. In an article in the "Chronicals of St. Mary", Joseph H. Edelen and Crolian W. Edelen provide an overview of Richard Edelen's family in England, which is summarized here (ref 1). Richard's father Philip Edelen (c. 1602-1656) was educated at Cambridge University and became a minister in the Church of England. Throughout his life he used different spellings for his last name, including Edlin and Edelen, while his brother Richard used Edelin and Edelen. As will be seen below, all of these variations in spelling would eventually be reincorporated by American descendants over time. Philip was Rector of St. John Zachary and St. Michael Bassishar churches in London, and is buried in St. Mary's Church in Denham, Buckinghamshire. The monument shown below is located above his grave, with the following inscription (ref 15):

Philip's son, Richard, was born about 1639, and was named after the family's patron saint. He was apprenticed to James Hills, the husband of his sister Ann, and under him probably learned the skills of surveying and/or law based on his later work in Maryland. In 1663, Richard married Elizabeth Banton (born c. 1639). Family tradition holds her to be the only daughter of the Lord Pannewell, but this has not been verified. This tradition maintains that the two eloped and fled to Maryland to escape Elizabeth's enraged father, a staunch Catholic. Richard, though the son of an Anglican minister, himself became a Catholic and all of their children were raised Catholic. It is possible that the Catholic faith held by many of their descendants today originated with this matriarch (ref 1).

More recent research by Charmaine Welker presents a different story than that in reference 1. As can be seen from a transcript of their marriage license, Richard Edelen and Elizabeth Banton were married in the Anglican Church, of which it appears she is a member (ref 26).

October 29, 1663

"w(hi)ch day appeared personally Thomas French of the Parish of St. Peter neare Paules Warfe Lond(on) Parish clerke (and) alledged that Richard Edelen of the Parish of St. Andrewes Undershaft Lond(on) Merchant age d about 24 years intendeth to marry w(i)th Elizabeth Banton of the same Parish spinster aged likewise 24 years or thereabouts (and) soe at her owne disposall: of the truth of all w(hi)ch as alsoe (that)t there is no lawfull Lett or impedim(en)t by reason of any p(re) contract Affinity Consanguinity or otherwise to hinder the sayd intended Marryage he made Oath (and) prayed liscence for them to be marryed in the Parish Church of St. Peter afores(ai)d."

(signed) Tho. ffrench

Their home parish was St. Andrew Undershaft, rebuilt in 1532, which still stands today in London near the river Thames (ref 26). Even though it is unknown whether their conversion to Catholicism occurred prior to or after they had immigrated, they definitely practiced this faith in Maryland. Henry W. Newman states that Edward Watson of Calvert County attested in Council that "Rychard Edelen was a knowne Papist" (ref 4). The Maryland Records of Land Patents show Richard and Elizabeth Edelen arriving in the colony in 1664 (ref 2). Crossing the Atlantic ocean at this time must have been quite an adventure, since the journey usually took several months in a small ship such as the ones shown here (a painting of the Ark and Dove arriving in Maryland). In 1664, there were only about 3,000 people living in the province (ref 3). Presumably, they first set foot upon American soil at St. Mary's City, the capital and main port of the fledgling colony. During this period, 100 acres of free land were granted to each arrivee who provided their own transportation under the 1632 Charter of Maryland granted to Lord Baltimore, Cecilius Calvert. However, Richard seems to have waived this right in exchange for transportation costs as the following document attests (ref 4):

"I Richard Edelen do from me and my heirs assign and make over unto Daniel Jenifer and his heirs all my full rights title and interest of mine and Elizabeth's my wife to land for either our transportation unto this Province as Witness my hand this ninth day of February one thousand six hundred and sixty-four"

(signed) "Richard Edelen"

(witness) Edward Savage

Richard and Elizabeth returned to England in 1665, where their first son, Philip, was born. This would seem to indicate some level of affluence. Richard returned to America prior to March 22, 1667, on which date he registered for a cattle mark in the Provincial Court (ref 27). Crolian Edelen notes that this date follows the Great London Fire. Possibly Richard Edelen lost his property in the fire and may have returned to Maryland for this reason. Furthermore, he notes that the Buebonic Plague was raging about 1665, possibly providing further impetous to leave England. Elizabeth and son returned to Maryland in 1669 at which time the following land was obtained (ref 4):

"6 May 1669, Richard Edelen proved rights to 100 acres of land for Elizabeth his wife and Philip his son proved in Common form"

(signed) John Bloomfield

In 1670 Richard was appointed Deputy Surveyor of the Province (ref 4). This skill must have been quite in demand, since as mentioned above, as each immigrant to the new colony was awarded a land grant for each person they transported (themselves, family members, and any indentured servants). A surveyor was directed to lay out and survey the specified amount of land and return a certificate, describing the boundaries of land, to the Secretary's Office. A patent was prepared and approved , and then forwarded the Governor for signature. A glimpse of other work performed by Richard Edelen can be found in records stating that he officiated the Maryland Assembly as doorkeeper from November 14 to December 8, 1688, and in compensation received 1,200 lbs of tobacco (ref 4).

It is also possible that Richard Edelen functioned as an attorney in Charles county in the 1670s. In 1674 Richard Edelen and Justinian Funnis were appointed by the Prerogative Court to appraise the estate of Captain William Boarman, which included Boarman's Manor in Charles County, near present-day Bryantown. Some of this land would later come into Edelen hands--indeed remnants of it are farmed by Edelen's to this day (ref 5).

Richard and Elizabeth (Banton) Edelen resided in St. Mary's County and had six children (ref 4):

Philip Edelen (d.s.p.)
Catherine Edelen
Richard Edelen married Sarah Hagan
Thomas Edelen (d.s.p.) married Comfort Barnes
Edward Edelen married Elizabeth Jenkins
Christopher Edelen married Jane Jones
Richard Edelen and his sons signed themselves as "Gentlemen", meaning they were members of the land-owning upper-middleclass. The term comes from the English class system and denotes those of "good breeding", and being landowners ranking just below the nobility.

Philip the eldest son "died without issue", that is, he left no offspring (abbreviated as d.s.p. for the Latin "decessit sine prole"). Crolian Edelen states that an old family legend has it that he was eaten by sharks in the Caribbean Sea (ref 6). Another son, Thomas, settled and married in Piscataway Parish of Prince George's County, but did not produce any offspring. The remaining male children each went on to have families, and will be described in more detail below. Marriage records, if any, for Catherine the only daughter, have not been located as of yet. Charmaine Welker notes that in the will of Richard Edelen, he does not refer to Catherine using a married surname.

Religious tolerance was an early virtue of the Maryland colony under the guidance of its founders. Lord Baltimore required of his brother Leonard Calvert, first governor of Maryland, that he sign a pledge testifying he would practice and enforce a policy of religious tolerance for "any person professing a belief in Christ" (ref 3). Unfortunately, that period ended in 1689 with the Protestant Revolution, a takeover of the colony's government by members of the Church of England. Results of this were the establishment of the Anglican Church as the official church of the colony, mandatory taxes to support the church regardless of individual religious affiliation, and the barring of all Catholics from public office (ref 3). Indeed, in 1704 all Catholic churches and schools in the province were ordered to be closed, forcing Catholics to worship at private residences. This condition persisted until after the Revolutionary War. After 1689, Richard Edelen was probably removed from his position as deputy surveyor or threatened with removal, however, a 1693 order of the Council did request that he continue his services until further notice (ref 4). Later generations of Edelens that remained Catholic were excluded from holding public office in Maryland until after the Bill of Rights was ratified in 1791, guaranteeing freedom of religion for all.

Richard Edelen survived his wife by several years, and died around 1694 or 1695. His will was admitted to probate in St. Mary's County. He divided his property in St. Mary's County equally amongst his five surviving children. In addition, each of the sons was devised several hundred acres of land in Charles County.






"Here lyeth Philippe Edelen, a man of rare endowments, singular integrity, holy Conversation and a most prudent solide and constant preacher of Truth in the most difficult times wherein he lived, continuing unmoved in the principles he had first layd and dying a true sonne of the Church of England, March 22nd, 1656 and of his age 58."

- http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~slhessick/peakes11B.htm
11B3.2. THE MARYLAND EDELENS

The information given here on the immigrant Edelens in Maryland and Kentucky is from the research notes of C. G. Welker19.

(a) The First Generation

Richard Edelen (4), son of Rev. Philip Edelen and Catherine Offley, was born around 1639 in Middlesex, England19. He married Elizabeth Banton on Oct. 29, 1663 in London. At some point Richard Edelen (4) converted to Catholicism, and he immigrated to Maryland in 1664. He returned to England in 1665, and his first son, Philip Edelen (2), was born there. Richard returned to Maryland, registering his cattle mark on Mar. 22, 1667. His wife and child came to Maryland in 1669. He received land for bringing his son to the colony. Richard was appointed Deputy Surveyor General of the Province of Maryland on Nov. 10, 1676. Although Catholics were disenfranchised in Maryland when the Protestants took control of the government in the 1690's, Richard Edelen (4) was requested by an order of the Council to continue in his work as surveyor until further notice.

The children of Richard Edelen (4) and Elizabeth Banton include Philip Edelen (2), Catherine Edelen, and Richard Edelen (5), Thomas Edelen (1) (born 1672), Edward Edelen (1), and Christopher Edelen (3). Richard Edelen (4) died in 1695.

More About Richard Edelen:
Burial: St. Mary's County, Maryland.
Record Change: June 03, 2004

More About Richard Edelen and Elizabeth Banton:
Marriage: October 29, 1663, St. Peters Church, Pauls' Wharf, London, England.

Children of Richard Edelen and Elizabeth Banton are:
  1. +Richard Edelen, b. Abt. 1671, St. Mary's County, Maryland, d. 1761, Charles County, Maryland.
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